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choosing colours for internal carpentry, windows and and floors

  • #1
    Registered Users Posts: 203 ✭✭ misc2013


    Trying to get ideas about the internal finish of new internal doors, windows and floors and shelving and tips about making things blend well.

    Currently extending and renovating. We are changing all windows and have pretty much settled on black PVC triple glaze windows. I'm between 2 minds about whether to also go with black inside or else white. Will have wood mammuth laminate- as of yet to deside on the colour. Also changing the doors. My quandry is as follows: how to match everything up. My husband wants oak coloured doors, unpainted hardwood window sills, skirts, architrave. How best match the wooden shelving with the floors? Am I overthinking it? I just seem to have assimlated this "rule" that you should never have more than 2 wood colours in any room. We are probably verring more towards an oak type finish rather than walnut for example. Our 30 yr old living room has been mahoganey with dark brown PVC and hate it.

    Advice really appreciated.


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  • misc2013 wrote: »
    Trying to get ideas about the internal finish of new internal doors, windows and floors and shelving and tips about making things blend well.

    Currently extending and renovating. We are changing all windows and have pretty much settled on black PVC triple glaze windows. I'm between 2 minds about whether to also go with black inside or else white. Will have wood mammuth laminate- as of yet to deside on the colour. Also changing the doors. My quandry is as follows: how to match everything up. My husband wants oak coloured doors, unpainted hardwood window sills, skirts, architrave. How best match the wooden shelving with the floors? Am I overthinking it? I just seem to have assimlated this "rule" that you should never have more than 2 wood colours in any room. We are probably verring more towards an oak type finish rather than walnut for example. Our 30 yr old living room has been mahoganey with dark brown PVC and hate it.

    Advice really appreciated.

    Have you thought about painting the door arcatraves and frames and skirtings and leaving the doors as timber?

    I painted a house like that recently and it looked really well.

    Another variation on that would be to leave the frame as timber (varnished) and paint the acratrave and skirtings.




  • Its personal preference to a large extent. I personally do not like timber (varnished or otherwise) skirtings and architraves. I prefer to see them all white, or in a few specific cases a colour that serves a particular purpose. But on the whole, white. But that's just me. Its easier to avoid the 'lots of different wood types' if you paint the skirtings as you avoid having two expanses of different woods together. I'd be more likely to go with white architraves and timber doors, though at the moment all the internal doors in my house are painted, and I like them.

    I had all new double glazing and would have liked a coloured pvc outside, but it was ridiculously expensive and I didn't like any of the standard colours that were normal price. The salesman persuaded me to have dark grey outside and white inside, and it has worked extremely well, I am delighted with it. The house outside is white so the contrast with the grey is nice. I would not want black or dark grey inside I think it would make your room options limited and white looks brighter.

    Within limits I think you can mix tones and timbers in a room just avoid things that shout at each other. For example a yellow pine floor and dark polished mahogany shelves would not do anything for either of them. On the other hand some light floors and dark wood shelves could work quite nicely, there isn't an actual rule, it depends what kind of look you prefer.

    The most jarring effects are when you randomly mix, say, rustic and modern, or are so anxious not to make a 'mistake' that you end up with something completely bland and boring. But an interesting piece of antique furniture, or an item that is pleasing but of a different era can be added to a modern room and look very appealing. I personally prefer eclectic to matching sets, but even if surfaces don't match, they should complement each other. I think this is easier with at least some painted surfaces.




  • misc2013 wrote: »
    Trying to get ideas about the internal finish of new internal doors, windows and floors and shelving and tips about making things blend well.

    Currently extending and renovating. We are changing all windows and have pretty much settled on black PVC triple glaze windows. I'm between 2 minds about whether to also go with black inside or else white. Will have wood mammuth laminate- as of yet to deside on the colour. Also changing the doors. My quandry is as follows: how to match everything up. My husband wants oak coloured doors, unpainted hardwood window sills, skirts, architrave. How best match the wooden shelving with the floors? Am I overthinking it? I just seem to have assimlated this "rule" that you should never have more than 2 wood colours in any room. We are probably verring more towards an oak type finish rather than walnut for example. Our 30 yr old living room has been mahoganey with dark brown PVC and hate it.

    Advice really appreciated.

    Oak doors go really well with white skirting and architrave. I'd keep sills white too. It's what we did and delighted with it.

    With the windows, we went with anthracite grey (7016) on the outside and white on the inside, and again we are very happy with the decision. Wanted black on the outside initially but were warned off it by a few people.

    We have oak flooring throughout but put in light grey shelving and fitted units as well as a very dark grey kitchen - again, it all worked very well.

    As the poster above said, the most important thing is to pick a style and stick with it in the main. We went contemporary and implemented the style throughout.

    Good luck!




  • My only advice I could give is don't have the interior of your windows black.
    It will limit what colours you can paint walls in the future.
    I love timber especially oak, we used in our new build,the trick we used by from carpenter is use oak with different grains rather than different shades.
    It was used to great effect on our kitchen stairs ect.
    We also used the same tip for choosing wood effect tiles.
    Keep the tone of the colour the same and use the grain to give different effects.
    Only thing to note it took longer to get the materials to suit,and slightly more expensive as more materials were needed to get the desired effect.




  • If you go with white,
    Use wedding bouquet colourtrend,
    It’s a warm white and not stark.


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  • mountain wrote: »
    If you go with white,
    Use wedding bouquet colourtrend,
    It’s a warm white and not stark.

    Just painted a room with Wedding Bouquet. It’s stunning. Also painted a hall with Winter’s Breath and love that colour too.




  • We have white skirting and architrave with timber flush oak doors and I’m very happy with it. Our windows are anthracite inside and out and we like it. Boards painted same colour. but another colour I’d consider is window grey. It’s very neutral.




  • ZX7R wrote: »
    My only advice I could give is don't have the interior of your windows black.
    It will limit what colours you can paint walls in the future.
    I love timber especially oak, we used in our new build,the trick we used by from carpenter is use oak with different grains rather than different shades.
    It was used to great effect on our kitchen stairs ect.
    We also used the same tip for choosing wood effect tiles.
    Keep the tone of the colour the same and use the grain to give different effects.
    Only thing to note it took longer to get the materials to suit,and slightly more expensive as more materials were needed to get the desired effect.

    What's wrong with black inside? What colours could you not put with black? Curious.




  • misc2013 wrote: »
    What's wrong with black inside? What colours could you not put with black? Curious.

    It would limit your colour choice to about 6 maybe 8 colours.


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