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Home made yoghurt with yoghurt maker

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  • 29-01-2021 10:24am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 1,031 ✭✭✭


    10 months into lockdown, I'm going to try and use my yoghurt maker for the first time.
    The instructions say high fat milk. Does anyone know which brand does a high fat milk or where I could get some or does it really make much difference compared to regular full fat milk?

    All advice appreciated.Thanks.


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 16,895 ✭✭✭✭the beer revolu


    hamburgham wrote: »
    10 months into lockdown, I'm going to try and use my yoghurt maker for the first time.
    The instructions say high fat milk. Does anyone know which brand does a high fat milk or where I could get some or does it really make much difference compared to regular full fat milk?

    All advice appreciated.Thanks.

    I'd imagine that they mean full fat milk.

    Or perhaps you know someone with a Jersey herd?


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Politics Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators, Regional East Moderators Posts: 12,110 CMod ✭✭✭✭Dizzyblonde


    I would think they mean full fat milk, and if I were you I'd go with that because any recipe I've seen just used norma full fat. Besides, if you use expensive hard to source milk first time you'll be put off making it often because it will seem like too much trouble.


  • Registered Users Posts: 32,381 ✭✭✭✭rubadub


    hamburgham wrote: »
    10 months into lockdown, I'm going to try and use my yoghurt maker for the first time.
    The instructions say high fat milk.

    Give a link to the instructions.

    Some tips are to heat the milk up very slowly for the original heat up. Keep it sustained at the high temp for a while if you want a thick yogurt.

    I do mine for 24hours as I want it high in probiotics and also happen to like the taste of the sharp acidic yogurt it makes. It also keeps extremely well as I guess not much sugar is left and stuff cannot grow well in the acidic enviroment.

    For the starter I just use live yogurt from the shops, it should be plain yogurt and say it has live cultures (not all do).


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,109 ✭✭✭TomOnBoard


    hamburgham wrote: »
    10 months into lockdown, I'm going to try and use my yoghurt maker for the first time.
    The instructions say high fat milk. Does anyone know which brand does a high fat milk or where I could get some or does it really make much difference compared to regular full fat milk?

    All advice appreciated.Thanks.

    Generally, all full (non-lite) milk in Irish shops is 3.5% fat. So, full fat and high fat should be the same.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,276 ✭✭✭Cheshire Cat


    I saw Jersey milk in Dunnes last week. First time noticing it.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,109 ✭✭✭TomOnBoard


    I saw Jersey milk in Dunnes last week. First time noticing it.

    Did you see a price?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,276 ✭✭✭Cheshire Cat


    TomOnBoard wrote: »
    Did you see a price?

    I think it was 1.69 for a liter, but couldn't swear to it.


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 4,696 Mod ✭✭✭✭Tree


    I saw 5% milk one time when I was on holidays to Scotland... It was (almost) too rich to drink by the glass...


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 2,585 Mod ✭✭✭✭Mystery Egg


    rubadub wrote: »
    I do mine for 24hours as I want it high in probiotics and also happen to like the taste of the sharp acidic yogurt it makes. It also keeps extremely well as I guess not much sugar is left and stuff cannot grow well in the acidic enviroment.

    For the starter I just use live yogurt from the shops, it should be plain yogurt and say it has live cultures (not all do).

    Would you mind sharing your exact method? I've never been successful


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,109 ✭✭✭TomOnBoard


    Tree wrote: »
    I saw 5% milk one time when I was on holidays to Scotland... It was (almost) too rich to drink by the glass...

    5% would be typical of Jersey milk in good feeding conditions


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  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 3,956 Mod ✭✭✭✭Planet X


    I make mine with a thermometer, bring milk to 86c, then let cool to 45c, spoon in some natural yoghurt, stir round.

    I then put it in a 750ml. sterilised kilner jar, stick a wool tea cozy or wool hat on it. Put it in a Coleman cool box, small size (6 beer can size one), and then wrap a wool blanket around it. 12 hours later, 750ml of natural yoghurt.

    Started it during first lockdown as an experiment. Been doing it since.


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 2,585 Mod ✭✭✭✭Mystery Egg


    Planet X wrote: »
    I make mine with a thermometer, bring milk to 86c, then let cool to 45c, spoon in some natural yoghurt, stir round.

    I then put it in a 750ml. sterilised kilner jar, stick a wool tea cozy or wool hat on it. Put it in a Coleman cool box, small size (6 beer can size one), and then wrap a wool blanket around it. 12 hours later, 750ml of natural yoghurt.

    Started it during first lockdown as an experiment. Been doing it since.

    And is it thick?

    Whenever I make it it's delicious but thin. Pouring yogurt.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,292 ✭✭✭0lddog


    And is it thick?

    Whenever I make it it's delicious but thin. Pouring yogurt.

    I found the 'thickness' depends on a number of things viz :

    - full fat milk makes thicker than half fat
    - starter ( standard Onken is the best I've found so far for a thick result )
    - amount of time allowed for fermentation ( longer time = thicker result ...up to a point )

    As per Planet_X heat to 86C and let it cool. I have a yoghurt maker gizmo that I got from Lakeland many moons ago. It just needs to be pluged in.


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,996 ✭✭✭✭gozunda


    Planet X wrote: »
    I make mine with a thermometer, bring milk to 86c, then let cool to 45c, spoon in some natural yoghurt, stir round.

    I then put it in a 750ml. sterilised kilner jar, stick a wool tea cozy or wool hat on it. Put it in a Coleman cool box, small size (6 beer can size one), and then wrap a wool blanket around it. 12 hours later, 750ml of natural yoghurt.

    Started it during first lockdown as an experiment. Been doing it since.

    Alternatively put in a thermos flask seal and leave set. Usually overnight. OH has used this method successfully for many years


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 3,956 Mod ✭✭✭✭Planet X


    @Mystery Egg.
    Thick. Leave it for the full 12 hours or more. Make sure it's kept nice n warm.


  • Registered Users Posts: 227 ✭✭tangy


    Strain the yoghurt to make it thick; line a colander with a tea towel, place over a bowl and leave in the fridge overnight.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,440 ✭✭✭Markcheese


    tangy wrote: »
    Strain the yoghurt to make it thick; line a colander with a tea towel, place over a bowl and leave in the fridge overnight.

    That's more "greek yogurt " ,
    Read the ingredients on the pack of yogurt that you like , if it has extra milk powder ,or starch in it it then you won't get that texture with just milk ..
    If you like a set yogurt ,then make the yogurt in the jar you're going to store it in , and don't stir or whisk it after you've put it to keep warm ..
    ( Onken works well )

    Slava ukraini 🇺🇦



  • Registered Users Posts: 227 ✭✭tangy


    Markcheese wrote: »
    That's more "greek yogurt " ,

    Yes it is, but MEgg was looking for a thick yoghurt, which it is :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 32,381 ✭✭✭✭rubadub


    https://www.activia.us.com/frequently-asked-questions/
    How is Activia probiotic yogurt different than the other yogurts?
    All yogurts are made with Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus, but most yogurts do not contain probiotics. Probiotics are live friendly bacteria that have been scientifically studied and when consumed in sufficient amounts provide a health benefit beyond basic nutrition. Activia yogurts contain Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactococcus lactis AND our probiotic culture, Bifidobacterium lactis DN 173 010/CNCM I-2494.
    Does anybody know if you use this as a starting culture does it go on to product more of the CNCM I-2494 probiotic too?

    Its not 100% clear if they are just fortifying it with it or if it is growing in it alongside the usual ones.


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