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First shotgun...

  • 27-01-2021 11:58pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 131 ✭✭ Ghost Recon


    To begin, I’m a rifle shooter for the past 8 years.
    I’ve never had any interest in shotguns until recently.
    My local club shoots fox covers with dogs and shotguns of a Sunday afternoon and after a few outings, I’m now hooked.
    I’m seeking advice re. recommendations for the following, as per above:
    - a beginners 12G shotgun (I’ve been told to avoid synthetic stocks)
    - choke selection
    - cartridge selection
    Any advice appreciated!


Comments

  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 2,759 Mod ✭✭✭✭ cookimonster


    What ever you pick, make sure its steel shot proofed and for a good selection of cartridges go with a 12 gauge gun.

    If you want a multi discipline gun go for a over and under sporting gun with multi choke. This will allow you to shot every thing from clay pigeon, various decoying set ups, walked up / rough shooting, water fowling etc etc. These can be got for handy money. Go with all the whistle and bells - single selective trigger, auto ejectors and 28 inch barrels will see you right with most disciplines. The spotter is more robust than a field gun and will transition from rough shooting to the clay ground no bother, were a field gun is lighter and handy to carry it's not meant for high volume of fire were the user and the gun can be beat up quickly. The opposite is true of a trap gun, which tends to be heavier and is not pleasant to toute around the fields all day.
    It is advisable to have help actually selecting the gun as shotgunning is more instinctive than rifle shooting and although you don't really need a made to measure gun, one that fits your build is left or right handed etc etc will greatly improve your shooting ability.
    If you dont fancy the over and under then the next option as s general all rounder would be a semi auto. Ageing multi choke, steel proof and around 28 inch barrel is in the ball park. Older semi auto guns in 12 gaugetend to be heavy but new guns are now lighter than some over and unders.


  • Registered Users Posts: 436 ✭✭ JP22


    What ever you pick, make sure its steel shot proofed and for a good selection of cartridges go with a 12 gauge gun.

    If you want a multi discipline gun go for a over and under sporting gun with multi choke. This will allow you to shot every thing from clay pigeon, various decoying set ups, walked up / rough shooting, water fowling etc etc. These can be got for handy money. Go with all the whistle and bells - single selective trigger, auto ejectors and 28 inch barrels will see you right with most disciplines. The spotter is more robust than a field gun and will transition from rough shooting to the clay ground no bother, were a field gun is lighter and handy to carry it's not meant for high volume of fire were the user and the gun can be beat up quickly. The opposite is true of a trap gun, which tends to be heavier and is not pleasant to toute around the fields all day.
    It is advisable to have help actually selecting the gun as shotgunning is more instinctive than rifle shooting and although you don't really need a made to measure gun, one that fits your build is left or right handed etc etc will greatly improve your shooting ability.
    If you dont fancy the over and under then the next option as s general all rounder would be a semi auto. Ageing multi choke, steel proof and around 28 inch barrel is in the ball park. Older semi auto guns in 12 gaugetend to be heavy but new guns are now lighter than some over and unders.

    +1.

    For foxes you really need three quarter or full choke.

    For ammo - 36g Alphamax+ (3's-4's) or similar. Do NOT use magnum shells unless your shotgun is proofed for same.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,772 ✭✭✭ meathstevie


    If your main shotgun activity is going to be at the foxes I would suggest a steel proofed decent 3” 12g semi, secondhand if you can find a good one for decent money.

    The reason why I would suggest a semi is that to be effective at foxes you want to be shooting at least a 36gr cartridge with a chunky pellet size which can be quite punishing on a gun and your shoulder. A well made semi would be the best option to absorb both forms of punishment.

    All the new(ish), I nearly dare say 10 years old and less, semi’s and o/u from reputable brands will be alright for so called non toxic loads but check for appropriate proof marks or other stamps on the barrel.


  • Registered Users Posts: 455 ✭✭ Asus1


    To begin, I’m a rifle shooter for the past 8 years.
    I’ve never had any interest in shotguns until recently.
    My local club shoots fox covers with dogs and shotguns of a Sunday afternoon and after a few outings, I’m now hooked.
    I’m seeking advice re. recommendations for the following, as per above:
    - a beginners 12G shotgun (I’ve been told to avoid synthetic stocks)
    - choke selection
    - cartridge selection
    Any advice appreciated!

    https://ardeesports.com/collections/semi-automatic-shotguns/products/hatsan-escort-as-semi-automatic-shotgun
    These seem to get great reviews in UK and come with 3year warranty.Doubt you will get a cheaper new shotgun.I bought my first shotgun and went with a semi-automatic as I tried s×s and u×o shotguns and couldn't get on with them,but that's just me and I'm a pretty terrible shot anyway.


  • Registered Users Posts: 218 ✭✭ Dai John


    If I was buying a 12 bore now I would consider the steel shot issue.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 184 ✭✭ Max H


    Also look at the Armsan A612 semi auto. 3 inch chamber, steel proof, and 4 year warranty. Love mine, bought it for foxes, but also clays. I do have a Browning U/O as well. But the Armsan cost me about 450 euro new.


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