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Volga-dnepr grounding 124's

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 716 ✭✭✭ Board Walker


    Are they saying that casting and fan blade landed 2 miles from the crash site?


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,892 ✭✭✭✭ Cookiemunster


    Are they saying that casting and fan blade landed 2 miles from the crash site?
    The uncontained engine failure occurred after take off. They then circled around and landed back at the airport. The site of the failure is not the same as the site where the aircraft came to a halt.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,598 ✭✭✭ Turbulent Bill


    Wonder will this hit the AN-225 as well, I think it uses the same engines.


  • Registered Users Posts: 694 ✭✭✭ BZ


    It's only Volga Dnepr grounding their AN124s. Antonov Airlines who operate AN124s and the AN225 have not mentioned anything about grounding theirs. In March the Ukrainian aviation ministry issued a notification about an inspection to be carried out on these engines due to risk of an uncontained engine failure. With relations the way they are between Ukraine and Russia parts specific to the Ukrainian engine may not be available too easily in Russia. Just speculating myself but nothing would surprise me with relations the way they are between both countries.


  • Registered Users Posts: 474 ✭✭ Fritzbox


    I suspect that the engines on the An-124 are the original engines fitted to the aircraft in the era of the Soviet Union almost 30 years ago. They are probably still not sure how long the D-18T can last until they fall apart.

    The particular aircraft in question had flown just over 21,000 hours.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,979 ✭✭✭ Stovepipe


    Russian engines have much lower overhaul lives than Western engines and the failure to contain the fan is worrying, regardless of what aircraft or engine is involved.


  • Registered Users Posts: 777 ✭✭✭ HTCOne


    Stovepipe wrote: »
    Russian engines have much lower overhaul lives than Western engines and the failure to contain the fan is worrying, regardless of what aircraft or engine is involved.

    Looks like it was a disk failure? No engine on any airliner is designed to contain a disk failure.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,979 ✭✭✭ Stovepipe


    the fan is supposed to be contained by the armour around the fan housing. It's a certification requirement.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,528 ✭✭✭ kona


    A fanblade should be contained by the casing, not a hope anything would contain a fan disc letting go at full throttle.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,892 ✭✭✭✭ Cookiemunster


    Stovepipe wrote: »
    the fan is supposed to be contained by the armour around the fan housing. It's a certification requirement.

    And yet accidents like Southwest Flight 1380 still happen.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 777 ✭✭✭ HTCOne


    Stovepipe wrote: »
    the fan is supposed to be contained by the armour around the fan housing. It's a certification requirement.

    Correct, and in this case the fan disc failed, not just the blades. The disc cannot be contained if it shatters like that. From a certification point of view, there’s a 1 in 20 risk of a failed disc causing major structural damage to the airframe. Guess this was one of those times.


  • Registered Users Posts: 551 ✭✭✭ Salmon Leap


    Looks like they are back flying. RA-82077 currently en route to Shanghai from Leipzig according to FR24.


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