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Introducing someone new to craft beer.. BUT.

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  • 15-11-2020 9:19pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 15


    I'm a craft drinker, been a lover of all crafts (almost all) for a good few years.

    Over the years, talking to non craft drinkers, they don't seem to get what it's like to enjoy the variety of crafts out there.

    Recently I've been trying to convert a few family members to at least try a few, compared to the generic muck they drink.

    One certain member say they have a wheat intolerance, barley I think as well.. but yet they drink ciders (Bulmers). Recently, The Crafty Brewing Company, crafty cider has been their choice, BUT they've suffered bad hangover, almost migraine type head aches and been suffering the whole next day. That was from only having 6 bottles, then the next weekend, they tried 4.

    My thing is, if their willing to keep drinking that and pay the consequences the next day, surely, there had to be a craft beer for them. They've tried 1 craft from the Stag Saor range and not been interested in trying any other crafts, I keep saying that at first you'll most likely not like the first few, but that there is a craft beer that'll suit you out there.

    So, I guess what I'm asking, what other crafts to ya's think that they could try, to ease them into the craft world?

    Could it be that ciders just aren't for them and that a craft, might be the lesser of two evils?


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 139 ✭✭KnicksInSix


    There isn't any wheat/barley in cider. My wife is a coeliac, she enjoys the 9 White Deer and Against the Grain offerings. I'm not much of a beer drinker so I'm not sure if they are generally accepted as being decent drinks. By in large to my taste a lot of the gluten free beers suffer from a similar unpleasant mouth-feel and aftertaste. Maybe some coeliacs could advise better though.


  • Registered Users, Subscribers Posts: 47,305 ✭✭✭✭Zaph


    I'd say leave them alone. If they are only trying them because they're being pressured into it, the chances are they're not going to give the beers a proper chance anyway. And saying that they probably won't like the first few until they find one they do like isn't really much of an incentive. If there are some Guinness drinkers, you might manage to get them to try some craft stouts, but in my experience Guinness drinkers are among the most hardened because as far as they're concerned nothing compares to a creamy pint in a pub. If they decide to try some off their own bat, then maybe they'll come to you for suggestions, but otherwise let them drink whatever they like in peace.


  • Registered Users Posts: 15 Fear333


    Zaph wrote: »
    I'd say leave them alone. If they are only trying them because they're being pressured into it, the chances are they're not going to give the beers a proper chance anyway. And saying that they probably won't like the first few until they find one they do like isn't really much of an incentive. If there are some Guinness drinkers, you might manage to get them to try some craft stouts, but in my experience Guinness drinkers are among the most hardened because as far as they're concerned nothing compares to a creamy pint in a pub. If they decide to try some off their own bat, then maybe they'll come to you for suggestions, but otherwise let them drink whatever they like in peace.

    I'm not pressuring them into it.. But they are not enjoying it if their dying all day the next day, just for the sake of drinking.

    I was being honest with them when it comes to trying crafts for the first time, no point in bullpooping them... It was the same for me and still is, but that's the joy of drinking crafts, there's always something new to try.. 50/50 chance.

    I'm my opinion, craft is enjoyed, not guzzled, just to get locked like other beers.

    Maybe it's just me, but I've never got a hangover from crafts and I could go through 8-10 different crafts, varying in ABV, although some have been hard to finish, but that's what ya come across when trying new ones.

    The person just seems to be a gluten for punishment, why would you do that to yourself...

    I know that if and when they do find a craft that they like, they'll thank me and the doors to their craft world will open wide, lol.

    They just won't realize, how much they'll end up spending, but it'll be worth it!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 776 ✭✭✭Fall_Guy


    Fear333 wrote: »
    I'm not pressuring them into it.. But they are not enjoying it if their dying all day the next day, just for the sake of drinking.

    I was being honest with them when it comes to trying crafts for the first time, no point in bullpooping them... It was the same for me and still is, but that's the joy of drinking crafts, there's always something new to try.. 50/50 chance.

    I'm my opinion, craft is enjoyed, not guzzled, just to get locked like other beers.

    Maybe it's just me, but I've never got a hangover from crafts and I could go through 8-10 different crafts, varying in ABV, although some have been hard to finish, but that's what ya come across when trying new ones.

    The person just seems to be a gluten for punishment, why would you do that to yourself...

    I know that if and when they do find a craft that they like, they'll thank me and the doors to their craft world will open wide, lol.

    They just won't realize, how much they'll end up spending, but it'll be worth it!

    It may not just be you, but I would say you are most definitely in the minority if you could drink 8-10 beers (craft, macro, whatever) and not get a hangover!

    Obviously this stuff varies wildly based on someone's make-up, but if your friends day is ruined the day after 6 ciders, I don't imagine it will be any different after 6 craft beers (unless the abv is greatly reduced in the 6 new drinks).

    I know I'd be suffering considerably the day after 6 beers regardless of whether they fit someone's description of craft/ macro / whatever


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,004 ✭✭✭✭the beer revolu


    [QUOTE=Fear333;115305278
    The person just seems to be a gluten for punishment, why would you do that to yourself...

    [/QUOTE]

    A rather apt typo!!:D


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  • Registered Users Posts: 23,212 ✭✭✭✭Tom Dunne


    Fear333 wrote: »
    One certain member say they have a wheat intolerance
    Fear333 wrote: »
    The person just seems to be a gluten for punishment, why would you do that to yourself...

    I see what you did there. That made me chuckle on a Monday morning. :D

    In relation to getting people to "convert" to craft beer, it's literally a matter of taste. I'd agree with Zaph - drop the crusade and let them discover it for themselves. There are a wide range of beers to suit a wide ranger of tastes, it's trial and error.


  • Registered Users Posts: 74 ✭✭Romer


    I second the 9 White Deer.

    I'm not gluten intolerant myself but I noticed in the past that when drinking Red Ales, I'd get a hangover while I was drinking it. Usually by the second pint. Not IPAs, Lagers, Stouts, or anything else. Just Red Ale. Which sucks as I absolutely love the taste.

    I recently got 2 mixed boxes of 9 White Deer (without copping that they were gluten free) and to qualify for their Oct-Nov discount and free shipping, had to get a box of Red Ale as well. Took the chance. Worth it.

    The Red Ale tastes good and no headache. As far as the mixed boxes go, there ain't a bad beer in the bunch. I like some better than others, but I'd not say, "No" to any of them.

    I was going to grade them so I'd remember which ones I liked best but I forgot. Have to get a couple more...


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,442 ✭✭✭Macy0161


    I managed to convert both my wife and brother in law over lockdown, albeit neither gluten intolerant. Well I had the brother in law on the way, but was still sticking to the same one or two red ales, where as now he'd go for nearly anything except Brown Ales!

    Game changer was the craic beer festivals, so essentially mixed boxes. And in fairness they expanded my own range too - I was always a bit meh on sours/ saison/ wheat until getting them as part of mixed boxes.

    I think the trick is to share a can/ bottle, then for the person it's not as intimidating (if that's not a bit extreme). I went with you need 3 mouthfuls to really tell, and then when it's 220ml, there's not much left!

    Obviously, my brother in law buys his own (although we do sometimes share a mixed box), but I have a good idea what my wife will go for our Friday night beers we generally share (NE IPA's). Her staple beers are O'Hara's session, Wicklow Wolf Avalanche and 8 Degrees Citra, starting covid as exclusively Bud. Incidentally, she still gets hangovers, but I have to say I rarely do with craft (and I can be in a hoop come the end of an evening!).

    fwiw my gluten intolerant colleague (who wasn't a craft drinker pre-diagnosis/ confirmation) really rates Wicklow Wolf Arcadia.


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,004 ✭✭✭✭the beer revolu


    I've had people curse me for converting them over the years - in that they were perfectly happy drinking cheap, easily available cans - until I gave them a taste for more expensive, harder to find beers!

    These days, anything can give me a hangover.
    If I think too hard about beer, I will have a headache the next day.:eek:


  • Registered Users Posts: 74 ✭✭Romer


    Macy0161 wrote: »
    Her staple beers are O'Hara's session, Wicklow Wolf Avalanche and 8 Degrees Citra, starting covid as exclusively Bud.

    That is some world class "relationship-ing" right there.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 23,212 ✭✭✭✭Tom Dunne


    These days, anything can give me a hangover.
    If I think too hard about beer, I will have a headache the next day.:eek:

    Yeah, I'm the same. But I think it is more pronounced with craft beer, especially since some of them are stronger in alcohol.

    Damn old age.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,351 ✭✭✭Cloudio9


    Fear333 wrote: »

    Recently I've been trying to convert a few family members to at least try a few, compared to the generic muck they drink.

    Well I wouldn't open with this :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 15 Fear333


    Fall_Guy wrote: »
    It may not just be you, but I would say you are most definitely in the minority if you could drink 8-10 beers (craft, macro, whatever) and not get a hangover!

    Obviously this stuff varies wildly based on someone's make-up, but if your friends day is ruined the day after 6 ciders, I don't imagine it will be any different after 6 craft beers (unless the abv is greatly reduced in the 6 new drinks).

    I know I'd be suffering considerably the day after 6 beers regardless of whether they fit someone's description of craft/ macro / whatever

    I wonder is it something got to do with the apples in these ciders, that has him dying.. I mean 4.5% ain't that much.

    I'm thinking maybe they might lean towards an light, clean, session IPA, nothing fancy, I've always found them to be a good all rounder, or a similar IPA.. then go from there..

    If I can I might see if I can find a good selection Christmas pack and get them to try them.. Good excuse for me to try them as well :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 15 Fear333


    Cloudio9 wrote: »
    Well I wouldn't open with this :)

    They know me, I'm blunt and straight to the point with craft poop. If I said it differently, they'd know I was lying, lol.


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