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Cork high rise

  • 14-10-2020 6:40pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 517 ✭✭✭ Stan27
    Registered User


    Cork city is getting a 34 story building.
    Great news imo.
    We need to pump a lot of money in cork to have a competitor city for Dublin.


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 13,710 ✭✭✭✭ Zebra3
    Registered User


    Stan27 wrote: »
    Cork city is getting a 34 story building.
    Great news imo.
    We need to pump a lot of money in cork to have a competitor city for Dublin.

    Any more info?

    Also, I think complimentary city rather than competitor should be a better way of looking at the two cities.

    Both should be hubs for separate industries/services.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,509 ✭✭✭✭ Cookiemunster
    Registered User


    Stan27 wrote: »
    Cork city is getting a 34 story building.
    Great news imo.
    We need to pump a lot of money in cork to have a competitor city for Dublin.
    A 34 storey building got planning permission from Cork City Council. It's a long long way from actually getting it built though.

    There are a least two who are guaranteed to appeal it to ABP (An Taisce and a serial objector from Cobh), and then there's the issue of if it will ever be built, seeing as the same developers have stalled on building the 15 storey Prism building in the city.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,509 ✭✭✭✭ Cookiemunster
    Registered User


    Zebra3 wrote: »
    Any more info?

    Also, I think complimentary city rather than competitor should be a better way of looking at the two cities.

    Both should be hubs for separate industries/services.
    Custom House Tower. It has its own thread on Skyscraper City.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 2,980 ✭✭✭ s1ippy
    Banned


    It's going to be a hotel. Genius.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,509 ✭✭✭✭ Cookiemunster
    Registered User


    s1ippy wrote: »
    It's going to be a hotel. Genius.
    If this goes ahead it'll be 3 -4 years before it's open. The virus isn't going to be around forever and the tourism industry will rebound.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 804 ✭✭✭ Paddico
    Registered User


    s1ippy wrote: »
    It's going to be a hotel. Genius.

    A 34 story hotel in Cork??

    You must be joking


  • Registered Users Posts: 319 ✭✭ Treehelpplease
    Registered User


    If this goes ahead it'll be 3 -4 years before it's open. The virus isn't going to be around forever and the tourism industry will rebound.

    also initial plans unveiled in 2017 so


  • Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators, Technology & Internet Moderators Posts: 21,079 Mod ✭✭✭✭ bk
    Moderator


    Paddico wrote: »
    A 34 story hotel in Cork??

    You must be joking

    I'd assume it will be a mixed development.

    Probably some apartments too, maybe offices.

    There is also going to be a brewery, retail, bar, restaurants, event space, etc. in the development.


  • Registered Users Posts: 319 ✭✭ Treehelpplease
    Registered User


    All of those except apartments. I think some apartments are there but short term let


  • Moderators, Entertainment Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 13,356 Mod ✭✭✭✭ marno21
    Moderator


    It's 240 bedrooms and 25 serviced apartments. Though it is 34 storeys it is quite slender.

    By the time this gets under construction let alone we will be back to pre-covid restrictions on travel, social distancing etc. Cork was bustling before this new lockdown too over the summer so there would be domestic demand also if the international sector doesn't rebound as quick.

    It would be a landmark hotel and would be a massive attraction to any visitor to Cork. Tower Holdings have put an enormous amount of effort to date into getting planning and the design work they've done. Look at the architects and consultants involved. They didn't do that without a belief that there would be viability.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,671 ✭✭✭ salonfire
    Registered User


    Why are they building and planing for high rise in a city that's going to be under water in the next 100 years? Today Cork floods multiple times a year.

    Ireland is not that short of land that we must continue to build in Cork. Pick some other city or large town that does not flood for development.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,716 ✭✭✭ Markcheese
    Registered User


    salonfire wrote: »
    Why are they building and planing for high rise in a city that's going to be under water in the next 100 years? Today Cork floods multiple times a year.

    Ireland is not that short of land that we must continue to build in Cork. Pick some other city or large town that does not flood for development.

    What do you mean cork floods multiple times a year ?

    Slava ukraini 🇺🇦



  • Registered Users Posts: 319 ✭✭ Treehelpplease
    Registered User


    you could say that about every city on a river or coast.. which includes all of the Irish cities, Derry, Belfast and most other major cities in the world... what's the point of building anything anywhere if in seven years the world will start to become unhospitable


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,979 ✭✭✭ blindsider
    Registered User


    Cork is at an advanced stage of planning for a hybrid Tidal Barrier Flood Defence System. The OPW and Save Cork have come together to develop this world class system with strong input from international experts. the system will be in place in 3 yrs and Cork's flooding will be reduced by 97%........

    ....Oh wait! Sorry, that was an alternative reality - Cork is phooked! :rolleyes:


    However, saying that there should be no investment in Cork is bordering on troll-levels of posting.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,671 ✭✭✭ salonfire
    Registered User


    blindsider wrote: »
    Cork is at an advanced stage of planning for a hybrid Tidal Barrier Flood Defence System. The OPW and Save Cork have come together to develop this world class system with strong input from international experts. the system will be in place in 3 yrs and Cork's flooding will be reduced by 97%........

    ....Oh wait! Sorry, that was an alternative reality - Cork is phooked! :rolleyes:


    However, saying that there should be no investment in Cork is bordering on troll-levels of posting.

    That's kind of proving my point. Why on earth are we spending so much om a Tidal Barrier. It makes far more sense to focus further development on a less flood-prone city, such as Limerick or Waterford.

    Flood defences do not always work either.

    There is some other town in Cork county, I think it might have been Bandon, that had a full flood defence scheme built. Earlier this year, the floodwater just breached from somewhere else.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,979 ✭✭✭ blindsider
    Registered User


    Cork has its issues. So does every other city - no exceptions. Nowhere is perfect and we will deal with Cork's imperfections like lots of other cities have done.

    Are you suggesting that Venice, New Orleans and most of The Netherlands should just pack up and leave?

    https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2019/01/the-world-s-coastal-cities-are-going-under-here-is-how-some-are-fighting-back/

    might be worth a read.


  • Registered Users Posts: 611 ✭✭✭ Pablo Escobar
    Registered User


    salonfire wrote: »
    That's kind of proving my point. Why on earth are we spending so much om a Tidal Barrier. It makes far more sense to focus further development on a less flood-prone city, such as Limerick or Waterford.

    Flood defences do not always work either.

    There is some other town in Cork county, I think it might have been Bandon, that had a full flood defence scheme built. Earlier this year, the floodwater just breached from somewhere else.

    The construction/projects that are ongoing in Cork at the moment are private investment. They are free to look at Limerick, Waterford et al if they want.


  • Registered Users Posts: 535 ✭✭✭ rebs23
    Registered User


    salonfire wrote: »
    That's kind of proving my point. Why on earth are we spending so much om a Tidal Barrier. It makes far more sense to focus further development on a less flood-prone city, such as Limerick or Waterford.

    Flood defences do not always work either.

    There is some other town in Cork county, I think it might have been Bandon, that had a full flood defence scheme built. Earlier this year, the floodwater just breached from somewhere else.
    If you look at he flooding maps Cork is actually less prone to a rise in sea levels than any other City in Ireland. Most of Cork is built on hills and the area that floods is a small part of the city centre that's already built on and relatively easily protected. The flood risk zones for Waterford and Limerick are far more extensive and have a significant effect on future development prospects.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,003 ✭✭✭ TheChizler
    Registered User


    salonfire wrote: »
    That's kind of proving my point. Why on earth are we spending so much om a Tidal Barrier.
    We should. We're not.


  • Moderators, Computer Games Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 9,298 Mod ✭✭✭✭ CatInABox
    Moderator


    This isn't just related to Cork and the possibility of flooding, but there's this belief in Ireland that our current cities aren't worth investing in, and that we should start again somewhere else. I really can't understand that mentality.

    Anyway, the problems with Cork (and all of our other cities) can be solved with a fraction of the money that we'd need to spend on getting another town (or even a greenfield site) up to the standard of our existing cities.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 7,716 ✭✭✭ Markcheese
    Registered User


    So if ,and when coastal flooding becomes a big deal in Ireland then cork is one of the easier places to protect .. as has been proposed a tidal barrier somewhere around the tunnel ...
    Or when the lower harbour , it's homes ports and industries are threatened then it's less than a km from whitegate to crosshaven , so a tidal barrier could be built across the neck of the harbour .. ( wouldn't necessarily be cheap ,but a 1 km barrier will protect the entire harbour )

    Slava ukraini 🇺🇦



  • Registered Users Posts: 17,244 ✭✭✭✭ namloc1980
    Registered User


    This got the green light from ABP today. c.140 metres tall.

    https://www.irishexaminer.com/news/munster/arid-40250306.html


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,875 ✭✭✭✭ denartha
    Registered User


    salonfire wrote: »
    Why are they building and planing for high rise in a city that's going to be under water in the next 100 years? Today Cork floods multiple times a year.

    Ireland is not that short of land that we must continue to build in Cork. Pick some other city or large town that does not flood for development.

    Are you really asking why are they building up in a city that occasionally floods?


  • Registered Users Posts: 918 ✭✭✭ riddlinrussell
    Registered User


    denartha wrote: »
    Are you really asking why are they building up in a city that occasionally floods?

    Also, according to most climate models, Cork is likely to be one of the least impacted coastal cities in Ireland (Bye Galway...) Only the centre is predicted to flood, have a look at the 100 year predictions for Dublin or Belfast...


  • Posts: 0 ✭✭✭ Bella Miniature Glassware
    Registered User


    Also, according to most climate models, Cork is likely to be one of the least impacted coastal cities in Ireland (Bye Galway...) Only the centre is predicted to flood, have a look at the 100 year predictions for Dublin or Belfast...

    I’m sure they all can be protected. Has the Liffey ever broken it’s bank?


  • Registered Users Posts: 94 ✭✭ Andru93
    Registered User


    I’m sure they all can be protected. Has the Liffey ever broken it’s bank?


    Its done it a few times over the past 20 years: (02, 09, 11, 14)

    Liffeyflood3.jpegLIFFEY_Twitter_Irish_Kop.jpg
    Liffeyburst1.jpg


  • Registered Users Posts: 319 ✭✭ MyLove4Satan
    Registered User


    These kinds of tidal surges are rare and have always been a fact of life. This mentality of 'we can't build or do anything based on mathematical projections a century into the future' is pretty bizarre. A city has to develop in the short to medium term with a cautious eye on the long term. If this became a serious issue (and it is not yet to any worrying degree) tidal barriers can built in future.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,716 ✭✭✭ Markcheese
    Registered User


    These kinds of tidal surges are rare and have always been a fact of life. This mentality of 'we can't build or do anything based on mathematical projections a century into the future' is pretty bizarre. A city has to develop in the short to medium term with a cautious eye on the long term. If this became a serious issue (and it is not yet to any worrying degree) tidal barriers can built in future.

    Cork city planning is very based on mathematical projections into the future -anything being built in the docklands has to be well above tidal surge levels - to such an extent that the city centre will be under tidal water and residential in the docklands will be fine ..

    Slava ukraini 🇺🇦



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