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Level 3 and kids

  • 06-10-2020 12:33pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 4,233 ✭✭✭ obi604


    In regard to training for under 6,7 and 8 type ages.

    Will this be allowed with level 3 lockdown?


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 7,351 ✭✭✭ threeball


    obi604 wrote: »
    In regard to training for under 6,7 and 8 type ages.

    Will this be allowed with level 3 lockdown?

    Yes but supposed to be limited to pods of 15


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,233 ✭✭✭ obi604


    threeball wrote: »
    Yes but supposed to be limited to pods of 15


    hmmm, so could you potentially have 4 pods of 15 separated in different parts of the pitch making 60


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,077 ✭✭✭ arctictree


    Also, it's supposed to be non contact. That seems to be totally ignored.


  • Registered Users Posts: 358 ✭✭ neddynasty


    arctictree wrote: »
    Also, it's supposed to be non contact. That seems to be totally ignored.

    Involved in U7 myself. The non-contact seems a bit vague on it's definition. I'm taking it as no games in training and no activities/drills with deliberate contact. Going to be difficult to keep a bunch of U7s into pods of 15 when they get giddy!! :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,233 ✭✭✭ obi604


    obi604 wrote: »
    hmmm, so could you potentially have 4 pods of 15 separated in different parts of the pitch making 60




    any thoughts on this?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 7,351 ✭✭✭ threeball


    obi604 wrote: »
    any thoughts on this?

    You can have as many as you want as long as the pods don't mix and are kept separate before, during and after training. The pods should socially distance so no contact such as matches.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,301 ✭✭✭ Audioslaven


    threeball wrote: »
    You can have as many as you want as long as the pods don't mix and are kept separate before, during and after training. The pods should socially distance so no contact such as matches.


    Its hard to see how this will really work in reality. I think these rules are pure BS. It was the same with the rule before Level 3m around social distancing when not playing or training and the players marking each other tight when training.

    The GAA would be better off going black or white. Either train as normal or stop. This in between **** is a head melt and just plain ridiculous like that stupid health survey app that goes nowhere and offers nothing. It is not even a tracing mechanism


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,351 ✭✭✭ threeball


    Its hard to see how this will really work in reality. I think these rules are pure BS. It was the same with the rule before Level 3m around social distancing when not playing or training and the players marking each other tight when training.

    The GAA would be better off going black or white. Either train as normal or stop. This in between **** is a head melt and just plain ridiculous like that stupid health survey app that goes nowhere and offers nothing. It is not even a tracing mechanism

    The whole thing is scutter. Kids can go to school, 25 to a class indoors and play soccer in the yard at lunchtime but going training is somehow a threat. Its all over the shop because PC nonsense prevents NEPET from actually telling us where the real issues are and tackling those rather than going after the low hanging fruit.


  • Registered Users Posts: 358 ✭✭ neddynasty


    threeball wrote: »
    The whole thing is scutter. Kids can go to school, 25 to a class indoors and play soccer in the yard at lunchtime but going training is somehow a threat. Its all over the shop because PC nonsense prevents NEPET from actually telling us where the real issues are and tackling those rather than going after the low hanging fruit.

    You can pick out individual parts of the restrictions and compare them and they don't make sense. They're never going to be perfect. All the restrictions are aiming to do is reduce the number of contacts a person has, especially for non-essential activities.

    I think managers of kids (ages 6-9) GAA teams will take 1 of 3 approaches
    1. Pay lip service to the restrictions i.e. break the group into pods and continue on as normal within the pods.
    2. Try to follow the restrictions as best they can with pods, non-contact training and social distancing and do their best.
    3. Decide the restrictions are impossible to implement correctly and since it's near the end of the year and weather is getting poor then call a halt to training a few weeks early this year.


  • Registered Users Posts: 582 ✭✭✭ CiarraiAbu2


    Would ye not just wind up for the season at this stage, weather is getting bad at this stage anyway.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 865 ✭✭✭ Akabusi


    That is what we decided to do. Normally during winter we have the Kids sessions indoors, that is not an option now.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,963 ✭✭✭ rpurfield


    Most kids teams finish up around Halloween anyway, well we generally do so I would say a lot will just put a halt to it now.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,208 ✭✭✭ LuasSimon


    Would ye not just wind up for the season at this stage, weather is getting bad at this stage anyway.

    It’s mostly strength and conditioning for our under 6s and 7s during the winter and a monthly beep test to ensure home workouts are been followed .
    This will ensure there will be plenty of Paul Mannions and Ciaran Kilkenny’s in the years ahead when Dublin are going for twenty in a row !


  • Registered Users Posts: 582 ✭✭✭ CiarraiAbu2


    LuasSimon wrote: »
    It’s mostly strength and conditioning for our under 6s and 7s during the winter and a monthly beep test to ensure home workouts are been followed .
    This will ensure there will be plenty of Paul Mannions and Ciaran Kilkenny’s in the years ahead when Dublin are going for twenty in a row ![/quote

    Wouldn't be surprised with some coaches out there.

    Just a matter of interest for coaches out there at what age group do ye become competitive this is a pet hate of mine and wish the GAA would do something about it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,351 ✭✭✭ threeball


    LuasSimon wrote: »
    It’s mostly strength and conditioning for our under 6s and 7s during the winter and a monthly beep test to ensure home workouts are been followed .
    This will ensure there will be plenty of Paul Mannions and Ciaran Kilkenny’s in the years ahead when Dublin are going for twenty in a row ![/quote

    Wouldn't be surprised with some coaches out there.

    Just a matter of interest for coaches out there at what age group do ye become competitive this is a pet hate of mine and wish the GAA would do something about it.

    Continuing training for me is nothing to do with competitiveness. I coach both football and hurling. Football you can drop for a couple of months and pick up where you left off. Hurling you stop for a few months and it takes a month when you get back just to get back to where you were. In Winter from 8s on wards we would do alot of skills work. In the summer we let them play their match at training interspersed with a few drills but winter is where you lay the foundations. Personally I couldn't care less if they didn't win a game until they were minor (apart from their own self esteem), my philosophy would be all about developing all the skills as if they have them they'll do well anyway. The kids themselves are competitive from 8 and it annoys them when we try to take competition out so we do competitive skills sessions which they enjoy far more.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,208 ✭✭✭ LuasSimon


    Under 12 is plenty of time if I was asked to be competitive.
    A friend at works son went to a under 6 or 8 Gaelic football open evening for a large south side club in Dublin last year . 118 children turned up so not surprisingly the club couldn’t cope and held trials over two evenings with sixty players selected and the other 58 failing to make the cut and that was the finish of his sons Gaelic football career .


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,351 ✭✭✭ threeball


    LuasSimon wrote: »
    Under 12 is plenty of time if I was asked to be competitive.
    A friend at works son went to a under 6 or 8 Gaelic football open evening for a large south side club in Dublin last year . 118 children turned up so not surprisingly the club couldn’t cope and held trials over two evenings with sixty players selected and the other 58 failing to make the cut and that was the finish of his sons Gaelic football career .

    Under 12 for the kids to be competitive or for the coach to be competitive? The kids will be competitive from the get go, the problem is coaches being competitive. Personally, I think if your going in there having a focus of winning championships before they're at least 16 then you shouldn't be coaching that age group.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,351 ✭✭✭ threeball


    LuasSimon wrote: »
    Under 12 is plenty of time if I was asked to be competitive.
    A friend at works son went to a under 6 or 8 Gaelic football open evening for a large south side club in Dublin last year . 118 children turned up so not surprisingly the club couldn’t cope and held trials over two evenings with sixty players selected and the other 58 failing to make the cut and that was the finish of his sons Gaelic football career .

    Is there no smaller club he could go to where he'd be appreciated? People always get drawn to the big name clubs. Its Dublin, its not like driving 20kms to the next club when you're down the country.


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,967 ✭✭✭✭ The Lost Sheep


    LuasSimon wrote: »
    Under 12 is plenty of time if I was asked to be competitive.
    A friend at works son went to a under 6 or 8 Gaelic football open evening for a large south side club in Dublin last year . 118 children turned up so not surprisingly the club couldn’t cope and held trials over two evenings with sixty players selected and the other 58 failing to make the cut and that was the finish of his sons Gaelic football career .
    Does under 12 really need to be competitive? Surely better start at under 13/14 and keep u12 and primary school with go games/total fun emphasis...
    Why would a club have to hold trials at that age. Surely they could find way to have all play. Its non competitive.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,963 ✭✭✭ rpurfield


    LuasSimon wrote: »
    Under 12 is plenty of time if I was asked to be competitive.
    A friend at works son went to a under 6 or 8 Gaelic football open evening for a large south side club in Dublin last year . 118 children turned up so not surprisingly the club couldn’t cope and held trials over two evenings with sixty players selected and the other 58 failing to make the cut and that was the finish of his sons Gaelic football career .

    That's madness, at 6 to 8 everyone should be encouraged. Kids develop at different speeds so there should be no need for streaming or trials at that age


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  • Registered Users Posts: 7,351 ✭✭✭ threeball


    rpurfield wrote: »
    That's madness, at 6 to 8 everyone should be encouraged. Kids develop at different speeds so there should be no need for streaming or trials at that age

    They probably had no interest in taking that many kids so decided to pick the ones with the best aptitude at the moment and if they miss a diamond in the rough so be it. Clubs like that don't really care about player development anyway they just overcome that deficiency by sheer weight of numbers. And if that doesn't work they'll draft in players from outside the county. They're closer to soccer clubs than they are GAA clubs.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,362 ✭✭✭ Cavan_King


    From my club, I’m finding it depends on the trainers. Some trainers don’t really want to be there and so have used the restrictions as an excuse and quit training yesterday or even via a text during the week.

    I coach a girls team and a boys team, both non competitive. With the boys, I plan to go until the end of November if possible. They already missed enough football this year and some if them will be playing competitive next year at 13s next year.

    With the girls, they are a bit younger but I still hope to get until at least Halloween out of it.

    If anything, I’m hoping to try and extend the year and not curtail it as they had no football from March until the last week of June.

    We had training yesterday morning and plenty of parents were very thankful as they said their kids need to do some kinds of sports while this is ongoing,


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,963 ✭✭✭ rpurfield


    threeball wrote: »
    They probably had no interest in taking that many kids so decided to pick the ones with the best aptitude at the moment and if they miss a diamond in the rough so be it. Clubs like that don't really care about player development anyway they just overcome that deficiency by sheer weight of numbers. And if that doesn't work they'll draft in players from outside the county. They're closer to soccer clubs than they are GAA clubs.

    Fair point. I'm involved in our U12 team and we've about 25 on a good day. I can't get my head around turning lads away but then I'm also conscious we'll probably lose a few lads in the next couple of years anyway. Different dynamics in a big city club


  • Registered Users Posts: 358 ✭✭ neddynasty


    Cavan_King wrote: »
    From my club, I’m finding it depends on the trainers. Some trainers don’t really want to be there and so have used the restrictions as an excuse and quit training yesterday or even via a text during the week.

    I coach a girls team and a boys team, both non competitive. With the boys, I plan to go until the end of November if possible. They already missed enough football this year and some if them will be playing competitive next year at 13s next year.

    With the girls, they are a bit younger but I still hope to get until at least Halloween out of it.

    If anything, I’m hoping to try and extend the year and not curtail it as they had no football from March until the last week of June.

    We had training yesterday morning and plenty of parents were very thankful as they said their kids need to do some kinds of sports while this is ongoing,

    We're finishing up next Saturday with U7 Camogie. We'd usually go until the end of October but the weekend after is a bank holiday (numbers are always down) and then it's practically November. We were allotted a 9am slot for the pitch due to COVID so it's pretty cold for them at that time. It's also an earlier start than they have for school so getting them out of bed and on to a cold damp pitch is less appealing as the weeks go by.

    Last Saturday, we managed to maintain the pods but there wasn't a hope of keeping social distance within the pods. We did our skills & drills and replaced the matches with fun games.


  • Registered Users Posts: 725 ✭✭✭ C.O.Y.B.I.B


    I manage u12 girls both Football and Camogie and we have upped our training with matches being off . We normally train until mid- December and then take a month off and that's the at for most juvenile teams in my club.

    With regard to Covid , we have all along and continue to stick to all guidelines with seperate pods and non contact. I think it's perfectly workable if everyone does the same , even matches should be continuing.

    On the competive front , u12 is still GoGames , leagues don't start until u13 for us which is when it will get a bit more competitive although this year was supposed to be our grading year , that hasn't happened with the uncertainties.
    I can't imagine turning anyone away and I think that there should be a place for everyone of all abilities right through Juvenile years .
    What playing GAA does for the confidence and mental and physical health of children at that age far outweighs any trophies .


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,233 ✭✭✭ obi604


    We can’t visit houses or even gardens from tomorrow. Will gaa kids be allowed train?

    Seems a bit Strange if gaa training allowed. But then again, there is no rhyme nor reason to any of the restriction plans.


  • Registered Users Posts: 161 ✭✭ davidx40


    Ye just wondering after yesterday's news of no more than 6 people meeting out doors can we still train ....I'm with u7 hurling ...had intended to run up to December


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,968 ✭✭✭ Tombo2001


    The guidelines are pretty clear cut- underage training is allowed at Level 3 and Level 4, not allowed at Level 5.

    One thing I wish the GAA would do is offer some advice on training kids on a non contact basis. The staple for any underage training is a drill here, a drill there .....now lets play a match. The drill is the boring bit where they learn the skill, the match is exciting part.

    However all the contact stuff is gone.

    Most mentors out there are parents, many of whom have never really played the game and are no experts on underage training for GAA.

    It would be great if the GAA could put out a video of drills that (i) you can do with a group of 15 kids and (ii) doesnt involve them standing in a big line waiting to take their turn.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,968 ✭✭✭ Tombo2001


    LuasSimon wrote: »
    It’s mostly strength and conditioning for our under 6s and 7s during the winter and a monthly beep test to ensure home workouts are been followed .
    This will ensure there will be plenty of Paul Mannions and Ciaran Kilkenny’s in the years ahead when Dublin are going for twenty in a row ![/quote

    Wouldn't be surprised with some coaches out there.

    Just a matter of interest for coaches out there at what age group do ye become competitive this is a pet hate of mine and wish the GAA would do something about it.

    One thing that annoys me no end is constant negative talk about underage gaa coaches.

    My experience of it is that the so-called coaches are actually vast army of parents who give up their time to mentor their own child and other children's kids.

    Until the age of 12, Its 70% child minding and 30% coaching.

    The narrative is always of the coach standing on the sideline roaring their heads off at kids; thats simply not the case, not in Dublin anyway - its 1 in 100 or less.

    The number 1 objective for pretty much any coach I've come across is to keep as many kids playing as possible, and that means first and foremost that the kids enjoy it.

    As for the competitive piece- GAA is a sport where a team plays against another team,, and unless its a draw then one of the teams is going to win. What do you want here? AFAIK until the age of 10 or 11, the scores arent particularly kept for any reason.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 358 ✭✭ neddynasty


    Tombo2001 wrote: »
    The guidelines are pretty clear cut- underage training is allowed at Level 3 and Level 4, not allowed at Level 5.

    One thing I wish the GAA would do is offer some advice on training kids on a non contact basis. The staple for any underage training is a drill here, a drill there .....now lets play a match. The drill is the boring bit where they learn the skill, the match is exciting part.

    However all the contact stuff is gone.

    Most mentors out there are parents, many of whom have never really played the game and are no experts on underage training for GAA.

    It would be great if the GAA could put out a video of drills that (i) you can do with a group of 15 kids and (ii) doesnt involve them standing in a big line waiting to take their turn.

    We had 20 at training last Saturday. Split them into 2 pods of 10 in separate areas of the pitch and in those pods we broke the 10 into 2 fives for the drills. So not much standing around. We replaced the matches with fun games like round the world, snatch the bacon and tail tag. So we still cover some of the skills/drills and then had a bit of fun too while still getting a run around. I know you can't beat matches but it worked out OK.

    My view, getting any more out of the season at this stage is a bonus so no need to focus on what you can't do or that it'll all be boring with drills. If you want a bit of competitiveness to replace the matches, setup some relay races. Just have fun for the last few weeks and don't be putting yourself under pressure.


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