Advertisement
If you have a new account but are having problems posting or verifying your account, please email Niamh on [email protected] for help. Thanks :)
New AMA with a US police officer (he's back!). You can ask your questions here

How to overcome defense heavy tactics?

  • 15-09-2020 6:06am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 356 ✭✭ conor678


    I have been recently wondering how do attacking teams overcome defense heavy tactics?
    Teams such as Sarries and Leinster in club rugby and South Africa to a certain extent apply such pressure with their defense that attacking teams struggle to break through. It is obviously to be admired but I wonder how will teams evolve to overcome this in the future?
    We saw how New Zealand struggled against England in the WC when they got over powered and shut out with the English defensive game so I am wondering where the next attacking evolution will come from?
    I wonder will more teams go for a pick and jam option to pull in defenders to rucks or will kicking tactics or a mix of such tactics start to be more prevalent?

    I know there's some proposed rule changes coming up (40/22 etc.) which should give more space to attacking teams but as I say how do people see the game developing to overcome this?


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 8,731 ✭✭✭ Tim Robbins


    conor678 wrote: »
    I have been recently wondering how do attacking teams overcome defense heavy tactics?
    Teams such as Sarries and Leinster in club rugby and South Africa to a certain extent apply such pressure with their defense that attacking teams struggle to break through. It is obviously to be admired but I wonder how will teams evolve to overcome this in the future?
    We saw how New Zealand struggled against England in the WC when they got over powered and shut out with the English defensive game so I am wondering where the next attacking evolution will come from?
    I wonder will more teams go for a pick and jam option to pull in defenders to rucks or will kicking tactics or a mix of such tactics start to be more prevalent?

    I know there's some proposed rule changes coming up (40/22 etc.) which should give more space to attacking teams but as I say how do people see the game developing to overcome this?
    Since Rugby went professional defenses have been getting better and better. Who remembers the day when you didn't have defense 5M back from a scrum?

    So my answer, a lot of the attack strategies, cross field kicks, offloading, decoy runners came more from league. So that's one answer.

    The other answer, to use a soccer analogy, you need everyone to be stronger passing the ball. In the 80's the top teams kick most of their passes from the keeper or the defender up into the air and then it was a 50 - 50 who would win it and the scraps afterwards were another lottery.

    Now in Soccer, every player including the keeper has to be able to pass the ball with both feet and they keep it on the deck. So passing accuracy is far higher and more skillful teams do better.

    So in Rugby, I think you need every player including 1 - 8 being strong with the passing and strong with the footwork. It will be no longer be good enough to just be a Galway, Clohessy, O'Connell, you will need lads who are more dynamic and stronger at the core skills of catch / pass and evasion.

    Particularly, at World Cups. One reason why I think Ireland burn out is we rely so much of putting your body on the line. Smashing rucks and choke tackling. All these things can produce big performances on the day but drain players.

    Also, every tweak to the laws whether it be re wording or re -interpreting is towards a more dynamic game rather than a power game. We have seen this at the scrum (decrease the hit), maul (no blockers) and the ruck (jacklar lift).

    As you say more changes will come. Particularly with so much emphasis on safety.


  • Registered Users Posts: 356 ✭✭ conor678


    Fair point and I can see how improved skill set across the board helps, for example in super rugby (especially the kiwi teams).

    Good point about the additional toll of collision rugby vs. Fast flowing rugby.

    I read a recent Murray kinsella article on the 42 about he Leinster defence against Ulster and the interesting thing about it was how little Leinster committed to the break down. Leinster also focussed on the big Ulster ball carriers, coetze and mccluskey, and killed thier momentum.

    Got me thinking in the short term how to suck in defenders and make the space. Pick and carried from the base and a few sniper from 9 might work.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,997 ✭✭✭ AbusesToilets


    You need a ref to police the offside line for one, and penalise ruck infringements. Blight on the game.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,269 ✭✭✭ realhorrorshow


    I predict that forwards picking and going on the run will become more common as a way to counter well spread defences and aggressive line speed. You see the likes of Caelan Doris doing it occasionally but I can see it becoming a very common tactic.


Advertisement