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Gamechangers you've discovered.

  • 11-09-2020 6:52pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 6,712 ✭✭✭ Rows Grower


    Being a relatively newcomer to the sport I've picked up a handy few tips from people on here that have made the shooting/stalking experience more enjoyable and comfortable.

    One thing this season that has become an essential part of my checklist before I leave the house is a set of Trigger Sticks.

    I used a set of homemade sticks for a while and thought they were good but to be honest they were a tad awkward at times and it didn't really bother me if I forgot them. Then I was reading a post from steyrman one evening where he said if he forgot his sticks (I don't remember the brand) he would turn back for them and it got me thinking if he needs proper sticks for an edge, I most definitely will benefit from a proper pair.

    I took the plunge and picked up a secondhand pair and started using them for plinking to get used to them, after a couple of thousand rounds they just became an essential part of shooting for me.

    I know I'm late to the party but for anyone who hasn't used a set yet, it's a different world altogether. Press the button and they drop down and self level on any surface without sound. Your heavy to hold steady rifle/cannon then becomes an afterthought as you can use your rifle scope as a spotting scope.

    Once you are sure of your target you then have all the time in the world to keep an eye on the quarry and wait for it to present itself for a proper shot.

    It's been a total gamechanger for me anyway as I've missed loads of opportunities in days gone by because when I drop the rifle to give my shoulder a rest Murphy's Law kicks in and that's the exact moment the game exposes itself properly for a safe shot.

    If there's anyone out there that does a bit of hunting and doesn't have them and is half thinking of spending a few bob on a set of sticks I highly recommend that you go for it and I really doubt you will regret it.

    For fishing I won't turn the key to leave the house until I do my verbal check of "rod, reel, hooks, weights and worms" for hunting it is now "rifle, ammo, sticks".

    Just thought I'd throw this out there in case it might help anyone new to the game and also in the hope others might throw out a few tips they rely on.

    "Very soon we are going to Mars. You wouldn't have been going to Mars if my opponent won, that I can tell you. You wouldn't even be thinking about it."

    Donald Trump, March 13th 2018.



Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 2,174 ✭✭✭ J.R.


    What sticks did you go for?


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,712 ✭✭✭ Rows Grower


    J.R. wrote: »
    What sticks did you go for?

    I got the gen 2 Primos Trigger Sticks, saw a secondhand set for sale checked them out on Youtube and went for it.

    If anything happened them in the morning (God forbid, I'd rather see a church fall) I would buy a brand new set without hesitation.

    "Very soon we are going to Mars. You wouldn't have been going to Mars if my opponent won, that I can tell you. You wouldn't even be thinking about it."

    Donald Trump, March 13th 2018.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,451 ✭✭✭ Vizzy


    Have to agree with Rows Grower.

    I was using a set of homemade quad sticks and to be honest they were phenomal. I was using them at night and I could hold the crosshairs on a fox at 200m, no problem. Only problem was they were awkward to find the target at night if you were not bang on when you "pointed" the sticks ( you had to try to move the leg an inch or two and hope for the best).
    Went for a set of Gen 3 Trigger sticks( tripod) and the difference is unbelievable, press the trigger, tripod self levels silently, you can adjust the height effortlessly and you can swivel 360 degrees. Can hang the rifle on the sticks while you scan the ground or do a bit of calling.
    4 foxes this week at varying distances out to 204m in total darkness.

    Another game changer for me has been a Z Aim sling. Carry's the rifle with no movement getting over gates, through ditches etc. Transfers the weight of the rifle on to your back and legs rather than on your shoulder. Takes about 3 seconds longer than a traditional sling to get the rifle mounted.


  • Registered Users Posts: 548 ✭✭✭ slipperyox


    I use a stick that's lying around, and put one end in my pocket,

    I then grasp the stick and rifle forend.

    Just as stable imo


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,332 ✭✭✭✭ Grizzly 45


    2nd hand 25 euro modified camera tripod does it for me.:)

    Confucius say."He who says one man cannot change World. Never has eaten bat soup in Wuhan!"



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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,451 ✭✭✭ Vizzy


    Grizzly 45 wrote: »
    2nd hand 25 euro modified camera tripod does it for me.:)

    Tried that as well, but there was so much faffing around opening clips totry to get them comfortable, I gave up.


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,332 ✭✭✭✭ Grizzly 45


    Agreed,I use it for blind hunting.

    Confucius say."He who says one man cannot change World. Never has eaten bat soup in Wuhan!"



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,872 ✭✭✭ minktrapper


    Freshly wrapped silage bales in a silage field.


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,332 ✭✭✭✭ Grizzly 45


    Arent they a bit heavy to carry around when you are stalking Minktrapper?:D

    Confucius say."He who says one man cannot change World. Never has eaten bat soup in Wuhan!"



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,872 ✭✭✭ minktrapper


    Grizzly 45 wrote: »
    Arent they a bit heavy to carry around when you are stalking Minktrapper?:D

    One under each arm. They kind of balance each other out.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,758 ✭✭✭ clivej


    Nothing wrong with a set of home made quad sticks. I managed to win the 'Sporting Statics' competition with a new record score a few years back at Bisley in the UK.
    100y standing of sticks, 200y standing off sticks, and 300y prone, dropped 3 shots, 147/150


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,332 ✭✭✭✭ Grizzly 45


    One under each arm. They kind of balance each other out.

    Horse of a man you are!:pac:

    Confucius say."He who says one man cannot change World. Never has eaten bat soup in Wuhan!"



  • Registered Users Posts: 191 ✭✭ Heavy handed


    I too started out with some homemade sticks and progressed upwards with them to my current set of viper flex.

    One thing that helped me a lot was a decent set of scope flip up covers for those unexpected down pours. Nothing worse than the lens all wet and your quarry appears


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,316 ✭✭✭ Pkiernan


    Biggest game changer for me was how much a good moderator improves the centrefire shooting experience.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,872 ✭✭✭ minktrapper


    Grizzly 45 wrote: »
    Horse of a man you are!:pac:

    Complement gratefully accepted.

    For ye that don't know. Big round bales offer great camouflage and the red fella is always hanging around freshly cut silage fields. You also have the perfect rifle rest where only a small portion of your body is visible. So just keep downwind of where you think they might come from.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,712 ✭✭✭ Rows Grower


    Vizzy wrote: »
    Have to agree with Rows Grower.

    I was using a set of homemade quad sticks and to be honest they were phenomal. I was using them at night and I could hold the crosshairs on a fox at 200m, no problem. Only problem was they were awkward to find the target at night if you were not bang on when you "pointed" the sticks ( you had to try to move the leg an inch or two and hope for the best).
    Went for a set of Gen 3 Trigger sticks( tripod) and the difference is unbelievable, press the trigger, tripod self levels silently, you can adjust the height effortlessly and you can swivel 360 degrees. Can hang the rifle on the sticks while you scan the ground or do a bit of calling.
    4 foxes this week at varying distances out to 204m in total darkness.

    Another game changer for me has been a Z Aim sling. Carry's the rifle with no movement getting over gates, through ditches etc. Transfers the weight of the rifle on to your back and legs rather than on your shoulder. Takes about 3 seconds longer than a traditional sling to get the rifle mounted.

    Took note of this Vizzy and looked them up, thought they might be worth a go so eventually picked one up a few weeks ago. Only sorry now I didn't do it sooner, complete game changer altogether.

    I'm a bit of a lone ranger so I have no one to blame if I make noise or fumble about when I'm trying to do my Nimrod/Hiawatha impressions. The bane of my life is farm gates and the whole rigmarole of trying to open them quitely and safely which up until the Z Aim arrived always meant removing the rifle placing and it against a ditch or a wall and then replacing once said gate is shut again. No hassle 9 times out of ten but sometimes it's awkward and who knows what was alerted in the next field the one time it made a noise.

    Apart from that the constant adjusting of a rifle on the shoulder on rough ground becomes a bit tedious after a while, It's a habit at first but on a hike i find it breaks the rhythm and when you stop to adjust the strap you become more aware of the need to cough or blow some snot from a nostril. Shur you might as well be shouting out "I'm coming to shoot you!"

    The Z Aim sling is the most simplest, clever idea ever for anyone carrying a rifle over a distance on rough ground, complete gamechanger, especially with a heavy rifle.

    When I went to buy one they were out of stock everywhere but I eventually picked one up secondhand, I only had it a short while before I converted my other two slings into homemade versions. It's easy enough to do once you have some old straps off a ruck sack or binocular bag and are able to sew.

    Anyone who hasn't tried one will not regret it when they do, fierce comfortable, you don't even know the rifle is on your back.

    "Very soon we are going to Mars. You wouldn't have been going to Mars if my opponent won, that I can tell you. You wouldn't even be thinking about it."

    Donald Trump, March 13th 2018.



  • Registered Users Posts: 6,758 ✭✭✭ clivej


    I've been using the 'Gunslinger rifle holster' for years now when out stalking/hunting.
    It takes all the weight off your shoulder and put it around your waist.
    I'm never without it now, great bit of kit.

    http://www.gunslingercorral.com/



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,387 ✭✭✭ Kat1170


    Would that sling work if you also have a small rucksack ?


  • Registered Users Posts: 194 ✭✭ keith s


    Kat1170 wrote: »
    Would that sling work if you also have a small rucksack ?

    @Kat the video shows it being used with a backpack, he moves the holder/rest off to the side.

    @Clive, do the sell them this side of the pond or only shipping over from US?


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,758 ✭✭✭ clivej


    keith s wrote: »
    @Kat the video shows it being used with a backpack, he moves the holder/rest off to the side.

    @Clive, do the sell them this side of the pond or only shipping over from US?

    They shipped to me without a problem, I just put in my address here. I bought the complete outfit, holster, belt, and front cross strap.
    My rifle weighs about 10lb all up so this was a great buy for me. Never a problem going thru the gaps in bushes, or over fences and gates.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 149 ✭✭ wicklow_hunter


    Attached is my home made solution to rifles falling off your shoulder when climbing gates and going through ditches!

    It attaches to the belt loops

    You can find similar clips on sports bags etc

    Just Loop it into your standard rifle sling and away you go!


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