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Combating mould

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  • 10-09-2020 6:12pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 3,782 ✭✭✭


    Hi all

    We rent a one bed flat, no other way of drying clothes except indoors. We try and keep windows open as much as possible but mould still forms on the windowsill, any ideas on what we could do?

    Many thanks
    Omt


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 17,037 ✭✭✭✭BPKS


    Hi all

    We rent a one bed flat, no other way of drying clothes except indoors. We try and keep windows open as much as possible but mould still forms on the windowsill, any ideas on what we could do?

    Many thanks
    Omt

    I would suggest buying a dehumidifier.

    There was another thread on this subject I saw a few weeks ago on boards with specific makes and models suggested.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,782 ✭✭✭One More Toy


    BPKS wrote: »
    I would suggest buying a dehumidifier.

    There was another thread on this subject I saw a few weeks ago on boards with specific makes and models suggested.

    Theyre hard on electricity though aren't they?


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,997 ✭✭✭✭elperello


    Refer your landlord to the Minimum Standards for Rented Housing.

    There is an obligation to provide access to a dryer if no outside drying area is available.

    https://www.citizensinformation.ie/en/housing/renting_a_home/repairs_maintenance_and_minimum_physical_standards.html


  • Registered Users Posts: 40,291 ✭✭✭✭Gatling


    Definitely go with a dehumidifier and maybe look into a local laundry self service places that have popped up everywhere over the last few years just to dry big loads in one go .


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,472 ✭✭✭Grolschevik


    Theyre hard on electricity though aren't they?

    No.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 30,137 ✭✭✭✭odyssey06


    Theyre hard on electricity though aren't they?

    Theres ones you can get that expel hot air as a byproduct. In winter it is like a mini heater so you wont need so much other heating running.

    "To follow knowledge like a sinking star..." (Tennyson's Ulysses)



  • Registered Users Posts: 32,634 ✭✭✭✭Graces7


    I endorse a dehumidifier They are a life saver. One place was so damp I had to empty the tank every day.

    It made such a difference. Mould is dangerous to health.

    And no, no huge running cost. They are not heating. Comparable to a fridge usage


  • Registered Users Posts: 33,947 ✭✭✭✭listermint


    Even if the dehumidifier cost you 5 euro a week in electricity it would be worth it.

    Fact.

    You only are born with 1 set of lungs do not take them for granted. It might sound sensible but alot of people aren't sensible mould is bloody well dangerous and living in or around it for any extended time is really bad. Cleaning it without safety equipment is highly dangerous you can end up with permanent lung damage.

    Remove the moisture remove the mould.


    Also the dehumidifier will make it far easier to heat your apartment especially in winter thus making it more comfortable to be in.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,432 ✭✭✭con747


    I know this is a UK site but a good guide and prices can be compared, http://www.dehumidifier-reviews.co.uk/dehumidifier-running-costs

    Don't expect anything from life, just be grateful to be alive.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,445 ✭✭✭phelixoflaherty


    The noise level is about the same as a fridge too


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  • Registered Users Posts: 222 ✭✭Floody Boreland


    The noise level is about the same as a fridge too


    Always found the compressor type quite noisy and not much use below 20 degrees. The dessicant one is much quieter and continues working at low temperatures.


  • Registered Users Posts: 54 ✭✭Housebuying


    Also treat areas that have mould with some mould spray like Astonish. It inhibits growth as well as removing it.

    I second the humidifier.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 199 ✭✭hayoc


    I use a dehumidifier for drying clothes inside, I simply point it towards the clothes rack and it sucks all the water out of them into itself. Clothes are dry in no time. I also use it as "white noise" at night sometimes if there is noise from the other apartments. Its not expensive to run at all. Its amazing how much water it sucks out of the air!

    Ive had it a number of years. It completely stopped a mold problem in another property.

    This is the one I have (its unavailable now but similar are suggested):
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B01GRM302E/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,826 ✭✭✭Truthvader


    Quick fix. Soak tissue in bleach leave on windowsill overnight


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,411 ✭✭✭✭woodchuck


    hayoc wrote: »
    I use a dehumidifier for drying clothes inside, I simply point it towards the clothes rack and it sucks all the water out of them into itself. Clothes are dry in no time.

    I hope this isn't a stupid question, but when you're using a dehumidifier, should the doors and windows in the room stay closed? I always try to have a draft going when drying clothes indoors, but I'm imagining a dehumidifier works more efficiently in a closed space? And roughly how long does it take to dry the clothes?

    We're moving house and my partner doesn't want to use a tumble dryer regularly (cost to run and damage to clothes). I wouldn't be relying on Irish weather to dry clothes though. So I'm seriously considering a dehumidifier for drying indoors, particularly during the winter months. I'm wondering if we'd need to dedicate a room for drying clothes though every time we put on a load, or can we just do it anywhere that's convenient regardless of open windows/doors so long as the dehumidifier is pointing at it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,782 ✭✭✭One More Toy


    woodchuck wrote: »
    I hope this isn't a stupid question, but when you're using a dehumidifier, should the doors and windows in the room stay closed? I always try to have a draft going when drying clothes indoors, but I'm imagining a dehumidifier works more efficiently in a closed space? And roughly how long does it take to dry the clothes?

    We're moving house and my partner doesn't want to use a tumble dryer regularly (cost to run and damage to clothes). I wouldn't be relying on Irish weather to dry clothes though. So I'm seriously considering a dehumidifier for drying indoors, particularly during the winter months. I'm wondering if we'd need to dedicate a room for drying clothes though every time we put on a load, or can we just do it anywhere that's convenient regardless of open windows/doors so long as the dehumidifier is pointing at it.

    I'd be interested in this too. There is a dryer in our complex but hard to get access to it, plus clothes last longer without it


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 199 ✭✭hayoc


    woodchuck wrote: »
    I hope this isn't a stupid question, but when you're using a dehumidifier, should the doors and windows in the room stay closed? I always try to have a draft going when drying clothes indoors, but I'm imagining a dehumidifier works more efficiently in a closed space? And roughly how long does it take to dry the clothes?

    We're moving house and my partner doesn't want to use a tumble dryer regularly (cost to run and damage to clothes). I wouldn't be relying on Irish weather to dry clothes though. So I'm seriously considering a dehumidifier for drying indoors, particularly during the winter months. I'm wondering if we'd need to dedicate a room for drying clothes though every time we put on a load, or can we just do it anywhere that's convenient regardless of open windows/doors so long as the dehumidifier is pointing at it.

    If you have windows and doors open you will be (possibly) getting moisture into the room from the air outside. Ireland is often wet - so our humidity is often high (even if its not warm).

    How long does it take to dry clothes? I can put on a full wash in the afternoon, hang it out on a clothes dryer rack, point the dehumidifier at it and the stuff will be dry next morning. Last week I wanted something that same night and it was already dry. Kinda depends on the clothing - big heavy fleeces will take longer to dry than thin t shirts.

    The dehumidifier I posted the link to has a chamber that fills with water and it knocks off when it is full so usually if I put a wash on, and hung it out in the afternoon, Id empty the chamber, run the dehumidifier and then before bed empty the chamber again so itll run through the night. Theres also an attachment like a hose so you could run the hose from the back into a shower base say, and allow it to constantly drain.

    Its pretty handy for drying out things that are an odd shape too - Ive a couple of vases that its too narrow to get your hand past a curved part so when I wash them there is always some moisture left inside, I just sit them upright in front of the dehumidifier and they dry out properly then.


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