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Somewhere to learn distances

  • 08-09-2020 6:26pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 2,663 ✭✭✭ Doyler92


    I’ve recently bought a set of clubs and I’m starting to hit them a lot better nowadays. I’m looking to now figure out how far I can hit each club. I’d just like the average for each one.

    Is there anywhere in Dublin that does this?
    I’m not really looking for a standard driving range as I’d like to know pretty accurately how far each club goes.

    I was thinking something along the lines of a simulated driving range but I’ve not heard of it anyways.

    Looking forward to your answers.


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 2,548 ✭✭✭ dan_ep82


    Spawell has top tracer.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 1,306 ✭✭✭ bobbyy gee




  • Registered Users Posts: 2,331 mike12


    Waste of time doing it on any sort of machine.
    If you are serious buy a V2 or V3 shotscope watch. See attached.
    If you have a range finder just figure it out on the course it's easy if the course is quite.


  • Registered Users Posts: 826 ✭✭✭ higster


    Or arccos sensors on clubs, not cheap and obviously on course real golf data but comes with other benefits.

    https://eu.arccosgolf.com/

    PS as an aside if you are beginner do not use the attachment on previous post as a comparison tool.


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 16,005 Mod ✭✭✭✭ slave1


    Get a second hand game golf and use it for a while, you'll soon get your distances bang on


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  • Registered Users Posts: 19,545 ✭✭✭✭ PARlance


    mike12 wrote: »
    Waste of time doing it on any sort of machine.
    If you are serious buy a V2 or V3 shotscope watch. See attached.
    If you have a range finder just figure it out on the course it's easy if the course is quite.

    Interested to know why you think a machine would be a waste of time?

    I would see it as the quickest way to find out, and more accurate that a tagging/plotting type device.... where you have lots of variables averaged out. For e.g your wedges would strike me as a bit "off"... 6 yard gap between the 50 and 54 and then a 25 yard gap between 54 and 58.

    I would agree that it's also fairly easy to get a good handle of distances very quickly on a course.


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,308 ✭✭✭✭ prawnsambo


    PARlance wrote: »
    Interested to know why you think a machine would be a waste of time?

    I would see it as the quickest way to find out, and more accurate that a tagging/plotting type device.... where you have lots of variables averaged out. For e.g your wedges would strike me as a bit "off"... 6 yard gap between the 50 and 54 and then a 25 yard gap between 54 and 58.

    I would agree that it's also fairly easy to get a good handle of distances very quickly on a course.
    The only caveat I would have is if you're playing off mats on a range. I don't think you get the same distances from mats as you do from a fairway. This might be entirely in my head though. :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 737 ✭✭✭ Whiplash85


    prawnsambo wrote: »
    The only caveat I would have is if you're playing off mats on a range. I don't think you get the same distances from mats as you do from a fairway. This might be entirely in my head though. :)


    Range balls travel 10% less distance than any of your bog standard Taylormade, Callaway or Titeleist golf ball. And thats not even the premium TP5 or Prov1.


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,545 ✭✭✭✭ PARlance


    Whiplash85 wrote: »
    Range balls travel 10% less distance than any of your bog standard Taylormade, Callaway or Titeleist golf ball. And thats not even the premium TP5 or Prov1.

    Well, they could vary more/less than a flat 10%. Some machines don't rely on actual ball flight, rather taking the swing speed, clubface contact, angle of attack etc. etc. For the ones that take ball flight into consideration, you can still do this indoors and with your choice of ball.


  • Registered Users Posts: 333 ✭✭ Innish_Rebel


    PARlance wrote: »
    Well, they could vary more/less than a flat 10%. Some machines don't rely on actual ball flight, rather taking the swing speed, clubface contact, angle of attack etc. etc. For the ones that take ball flight into consideration, you can still do this indoors and with your choice of ball.


    I built something like this at home during the lockdown - used Skygolf skytrak as my launch monitor. They have built in a bag mapping tool. When I tried transferring the numbers onto golf course it was brilliant.


    I forced myself to take my golf ego out of the equation (i.e. not accepting my average 8 iron goes carries 145 for total 152 yards but pumping myself up to thinking about that one time I flushed it 160 through the air).


    So had a small sheet with each club yardages written (assuming flat lie no winds etc) you still need to take into account your own estimation of impact of lie/wind/slope etc but I found my club selection for distance was so much better - now it hasn't solved that I may have been 20 yards offline but in general I was pin high!!!


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,331 mike12


    PARlance wrote: »
    Interested to know why you think a machine would be a waste of time?

    I would see it as the quickest way to find out, and more accurate that a tagging/plotting type device.... where you have lots of variables averaged out. For e.g your wedges would strike me as a bit "off"... 6 yard gap between the 50 and 54 and then a 25 yard gap between 54 and 58.

    I would agree that it's also fairly easy to get a good handle of distances very quickly on a course.

    I don't really hit any full shots with my wedges so not really a issue.

    All the machines have different settings and it's very hard to swing indoors or at a range where u are warmed up and hitting 10 8 irons in a row to get a average.

    What people really need are their
    Good distance, the distance when you strike it well the ball goes.
    Then an average strike distance hopefully within 10 yards of a good strike.

    On a machine it's hard to do that.

    If you have access to a big field do it old school mark out 130 yards then see what you hit to that distance and go up 10 to 12 yards per club from there.

    It's much more important in this country to know how far you hit the ball into the wind or down wind rather than X distance for flat calm.


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