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Commuter traffic, motorway to racecourse

  • 01-09-2020 7:19pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 253 ✭✭ xo.mary


    I looked but couldn’t see an answer.

    Can anyone enlighten me on the current rush hour traffic in the east of the city?

    Starting a new job at the Racecourse. I’ll be commuting the first week on the M6 so I’ll be on the N6 once I’m in Galway towards Briarhill onto Parkmore. 9am starts ðŸ˜

    Thanks


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 1,465 ✭✭✭ Notch000


    not too sure about times, but you could come off the motorway at Oranmore exit and take carranmore road across to racecourse to avoid the dual carraigway carnage into town


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,862 ✭✭✭✭ Mrs OBumble


    Parkmore Road was empty at 8:30am yesterday.

    It's likely to stay like that until the wfh thing fades.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 24,778 ✭✭✭✭ Miracle Drab Penguin



    It's likely to stay like that until the wfh thing fades.

    WFH fades?

    The cat is out of the bag now, the massive advantages of WFH have been realised by a lot more people than before so it will be thankfully here to stay for at least some days per week for many many more people than before.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,578 ✭✭✭ salonfire


    WFH fades?

    The cat is out of the bag now, the massive advantages of WFH have been realised by a lot more people than before so it will be thankfully here to stay for at least some days per week for many many more people than before.

    You think employers are going to take the full-time risk of employees managing to break their necks doing something stupid while WFH and sueing?

    Legal and Health & Safety will see people safely back in the office where anybody engaging in dodgy practices can be spotted and accidents prevented.

    This is a country where you can get a payout for banging your knee in a restaurant. No way is a WFH free for all going to be tolerated by employers long-term. It would be utterly stupid of them to carry that risk.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,448 ✭✭✭ sgthighway


    salonfire wrote: »
    You think employers are going to take the full-time risk of employees managing to break their necks doing something stupid while WFH and sueing?

    Legal and Health & Safety will see people safely back in the office where anybody engaging in dodgy practices can be spotted and accidents prevented.

    This is a country where you can get a payout for banging your knee in a restaurant. No way is a WFH free for all going to be tolerated by employers long-term. It would be utterly stupid of them to carry that risk.

    Most employers carry out a full WFH Assessment. It might mean buying a chair or foot rest for the employee and it might meant a call that the employee will be better off at work.
    I went through it myself where I just needed a chair.

    That road is empty in the morning. You won't be caught at the lights for more than one change.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,164 ✭✭✭ xckjoo


    Might be worth sticking it into Google Maps directions thing and specify the time you need to arrive to see what time it suggests leaving. If you're ultra concerned you could keep an eye on estimated journey times for this route for a few mornings before you start the job.

    Congrats on the new job! Best of luck and hope it's fun!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 24,778 ✭✭✭✭ Miracle Drab Penguin


    salonfire wrote: »
    You think employers are going to take the full-time risk of employees managing to break their necks doing something stupid while WFH and sueing?

    Legal and Health & Safety will see people safely back in the office where anybody engaging in dodgy practices can be spotted and accidents prevented.

    This is a country where you can get a payout for banging your knee in a restaurant. No way is a WFH free for all going to be tolerated by employers long-term. It would be utterly stupid of them to carry that risk.

    WFH has been a thing for years for many companies and I’ve yet to hear any of these scaremongering stories happen.

    I was one week in the office in the first 3 months of the year prior to the full on covid WFH. My employer has no issue whatsoever with WFH and I know plenty of others that are the same. I kitted out my own home office they have no interest in it or have no desire to assess it or any such nonsense.

    I doubt very much a company would be held liable for someone hurting themselves in their own home either, would be a ridiculous to even consider.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,594 ✭✭✭ John_Rambo


    Nox, you're a good employee, you've a good employer, you've got a solid, healthy, mature & professional relationship with dual flexibility and mutual respect.

    For each one of your bosses there's 100 bosses that refuse to trust staff, think their staff is incapable, insist on having eyes on staff, feel the need to micro-manage and refuse to believe that people are as (or more) productive at home than they are were they can be watched.

    This is a reality for a lot of people. You may not have come across it, but it's that way for some folk.


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,862 ✭✭✭✭ Mrs OBumble


    John_Rambo wrote: »
    Nox, you're a good employee, you've a good employer, you've got a solid, healthy, mature & professional relationship with dual flexibility and mutual respect.

    For each one of your bosses there's 100 bosses that refuse to trust staff, think their staff is incapable, insist on having eyes on staff, feel the need to micro-manage and refuse to believe that people are as (or more) productive at home than they are were they can be watched.

    And for each good employee, there's also a clock-watching slacker who gives the minimal possible effort (you've had discussions with some of them on the Work and Jobs forum).

    There are also issues with misunderstandings: one of my employers has had a few things now that would have been nipped in the bud very quickly F2F, but which turned into massive dramas because someone was mistake about one step of a procedure.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,594 ✭✭✭ John_Rambo


    And for each good employee, there's also a clock-watching slacker who gives the minimal possible effort (you've had discussions with some of them on the Work and Jobs forum).

    There are also issues with misunderstandings: one of my employers has had a few things now that would have been nipped in the bud very quickly F2F, but which turned into massive dramas because someone was mistake about one step of a procedure.

    I'm sure there is, I know there is, but I don't honestly remember having discussions with them on the work and jobs forum!! And yeah, agreed, things escalate very quickly when a face to face talk could have nipped things in the bud.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,578 ✭✭✭ salonfire


    WFH has been a thing for years for many companies and I’ve yet to hear any of these scaremongering stories happen.


    Yes, a minority of people were able to WFH. So less risk.

    Now with a greater number of people looking to work from home permanently, that risk increases.

    Used to be also if you banged your knee in a resturant, you kept your head down, not make a scene and make an even bigger fool of yourself. Nowadays, it is a payout.
    I doubt very much a company would be held liable for someone hurting themselves in their own home either, would be a ridiculous to even consider.

    You obviously know better than those companies and entire H+S departments that do conduct assessments in the homes of people who WFH. You should let them know they are wasting their time and money based on your superior knowledge.


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