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Following a gpx while running

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  • 04-07-2020 2:41pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 703 ✭✭✭


    Hey folks,

    I ran the 6km fairly castle look in Ticknock this morning. I downloaded a gpx file of it to my phone and opened it in an app (possibly called GPX viewer). I was keeping my phone in a little waist pouch for money passports etc. We went off track a couple times where the signage was not amazing though generally it was easy enough to following. I really enjoyed it and would like to take up trail running, im just wondering what is the best way to follow routes, especially ones that don't have signage at every turn. I am assuming many/most do not..

    I was looking at running watch's and had decided not to get one but perhaps this is the best option. I am thinking today it would be handy having the phone mounted on my forearm with an app that is always on that shows the route and has some metrics like pace, heart rate etc. Not sure if that exists or not.. I did a bit of searching and didn't see anything, perhaps because people don't use phones for live navigation while running??

    I couldn't justify spending 500 euro plus on a watch like the Garmin fenix. The Garmin instinct looks ok and the Coros Apex looks really good though its a bit hard to come by and the software seems to be way behind Garmin's.

    Anyway just wondering what do people normally do?


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 6,340 ✭✭✭TFBubendorfer


    Have a look at an app called "Komoot". It does include the ability to create (and load) routes, and turn-by-turn navigation is helped by a voice that warns you when there is a junction coming up.

    Before you spend €500, give that a go and see how you like it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 703 ✭✭✭rowanh


    Thanks, i'll try it out next time I go out for a run. I though I had previously seen that only the high end Garmin's (Fenix and maybe 945) had navigation but it seems that is not the case, the 245 does and even the 235 has downloadable "apps" that do it so perhaps this is the way to go.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,654 ✭✭✭Enduro


    By far the best thing to do is learn to navigate for yourself. It's not that hard, and it's one of the most useful skills a trail runner can have. It opens up the world as your playground.

    You have enough technology already to ensure that even if you make mistakes whilst learning to find your way using your own skills, you'll always be able to get back to where you need to be. Even without the technology it's hard to get dangerously badly lost in Ireland. We don't really have wilderness. Trails, roads, houses, farms everywhere. Look at any other trail runners you see on the hill. More than likely you won't see any looking at a device.

    Try doing the same route again, but only reference the phone if you're doubting where you are.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,000 ✭✭✭opus


    I use the View Ranger app on Android for hiking, mainly to get routes for places I wouldn't know very well. Haven't used anything for running really apart Google maps sometimes when I'm abroad just to check where I am.


  • Registered Users Posts: 703 ✭✭✭rowanh


    Enduro wrote: »
    By far the best thing to do is learn to navigate for yourself. It's not that hard, and it's one of the most useful skills a trail runner can have. It opens up the world as your playground.

    Try doing the same route again, but only reference the phone if you're doubting where you are.


    Thanks, I think this is likely very good advice, I will have a look into how to learn navigation for trail running. I have a VERY poor sense of direction and literally the opposite of a photographic memory when it comes to finding my way back somewhere but this might actually be a great way to work on improving it. I do rely on technology too much for directions generally though before Google maps etc I would often really struggle. More than once I dropped someone home and then got lost in their housing estate and drove around in circles not being able to find my way out..


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  • Registered Users Posts: 122 ✭✭spc78


    Any Garmin watch that has connect IQ can run dwmap which will allows you to follow a GPX file without a phone e.g vivoactive, Garmin 235....dont need one of the expensive ones


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 24,097 Mod ✭✭✭✭robinph


    Don't most of the Garmins have the option to follow a breadcrumb trail by default, no need for another app to be installed?

    Have used it to assist with anticipating which corner of a field on trail races might have the exit style in when you can't quite see the way back out initially and the runner infront is out of sight.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,401 ✭✭✭fletch


    robinph wrote: »
    Don't most of the Garmins have the option to follow a breadcrumb trail by default, no need for another app to be installed?
    Yeh most do..I know the 645/935/945/735xt/Fenixes have it anyway. I've used it to navigate across mountains in the howling wind and rain in the middle of the night and it was fantastic. A 735xt can be picked up fairly cheap now. Find the route you want online, grab the gpx and load it into Garmin Connect as a course and send the course to your device.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,654 ✭✭✭Enduro


    rowanh wrote: »
    Thanks, I think this is likely very good advice, I will have a look into how to learn navigation for trail running. I have a VERY poor sense of direction and literally the opposite of a photographic memory when it comes to finding my way back somewhere but this might actually be a great way to work on improving it. I do rely on technology too much for directions generally though before Google maps etc I would often really struggle. More than once I dropped someone home and then got lost in their housing estate and drove around in circles not being able to find my way out..

    The first thing to get hold of is understanding maps and knowing what everthing on any given map means (there a lots of different kinds of maps showing all sorts of information in all sorts of ways). Being able to read contours, trail/road symbols, and vegetation symbols if available are probably most useful.

    Secondly... build your sense of direction. Start keeping your eyes open (in a metaphorical sense) all the time, especially when you're up in the hills, but not just there. Notice things. If you're walking somewhere pay attention to things... junctions, green spaces etc. Look it up on a map afterwards and start relating it all together.


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