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Induction Cooking for Beginners?

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  • 14-05-2020 10:34am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 249 ✭✭


    As a working lady, I do little cooking and usually prefer to cook one day in the week or order meal online. However, nowadays, my stomach is upset, and I am thinking to avoid junk and readymade meal. According to my mom, I should prepare my food at home.

    First of all, I don't have enough time to cook time taking meals. My friend suggested me to use induction cooking. In this regard, I have to buy an induction stove at first, and I have no idea which one would be the right option. Secondly, online sources say I can't use any of cookware for induction cooking. I found these induction cookware here https://cookwareinsider.com/induction-cookware/. Do you I need to purchase induction cookware as well? Can't I use my stainless steel cookware with and without nonstick coating ones for induction cooking?

    Moreover, I found several benefits of using inducting cooking. Like it is fast, eco-friendly and don't create a mess. But their prices amazed me due to high quotes. Can you suggest me any induction stove with a reasonable quote? It would be great if share store link as well.

    Are there any cons of induction cooking? Or things that newbies must consider before starting inducting cooking?
    Tagged:


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 3,383 ✭✭✭Ryath


    Induction is handier and it's quicker to heat up and you do have instant accurate control. It is cleaner as food doesn't burn on. Our's is 8 years old and still cleans up like new. I still wouldn't be replacing a working hob to upgrade unless you have to.

    It's not going to be a magic wand to make you cook faster though. Yes it's quicker to heat up but you're only talking a couple of minutes. The accurate control is the biggest advantage.

    You can check your existing pots with a magnet if it sticks to the base they will work with induction.

    Ikea do have a portable hob
    https://www.ikea.com/ie/en/p/tillreda-portable-induction-hob-white-40331630/

    Also well priced for proper hobs
    https://www.ikea.com/ie/en/cat/induction-hobs-20813/?sort=priceAsc&filters=price_numeral%3A%5B111%2C1250%5D


  • Registered Users Posts: 249 ✭✭SixtaWalthers


    Thanks. The small hobs are not much expensive, and I think they would be enough for a single person meal. I think this one would be the right option for me https://www.ikea.com/ie/en/p/tillreda-portable-induction-hob-white-40331630/. I usually would like to make soups, roast meatballs and brown loaves of buns.

    I just read that magnetic cookware is the right option that we should use for induction tops. Does Ikea also offer induction cookware with a magnetic base? I think I will only need saucepan and frying pans. Maybe 1-2 would be enough.


  • Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 67,913 Mod ✭✭✭✭L1011


    I think all cookware sold in IKEA is stainless steel, which works on induction.

    You can't do proper wok cooking on an induction hob (anyone who comes in to post that they do - you don't, you're using the wok as a big frying pan. Sorry); but that is not really a concern unless you actually want to do that. You need a high power gas burner for it.

    There are no other real disadvantages.


  • Registered Users Posts: 249 ✭✭SixtaWalthers


    L1011 wrote: »
    I think all cookware sold in IKEA is stainless steel, which works on induction.

    You can't do proper wok cooking on an induction hob (anyone who comes in to post that they do - you don't, you're using the wok as a big frying pan. Sorry); but that is not really a concern unless you actually want to do that. You need a high power gas burner for it.

    There are no other real disadvantages.

    My mom who is just like a chef for our family also has the same opinion. But I am tell her since the beginning that mom, it will work for me because I don't need to cook a lot. I saw many DIY videos on social media where even they are using ceramic pans to boil eggs etc on induction hob.

    Or maybe I misunderstood.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,383 ✭✭✭Ryath


    Ikea 365 products are very good quality for the money. This set would cover most peoples needs.

    https://www.ikea.com/ie/en/p/ikea-365-5-piece-cookware-set-10368875/


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  • Registered Users Posts: 16,813 ✭✭✭✭the beer revolu


    OP, I'm slightly repeating what others have said or alluded to but buying an induction hob (assuming you already have a hob) is not going to magically give you a desire to cook or the time to do so.
    An induction hob is just a hob - yes, it will heat up pots faster but that's it.
    If you are in the market for a hob anyway, by all means get an induction one - they're great - but if you already have a working hob, don't bother.


  • Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 67,913 Mod ✭✭✭✭L1011


    My mom who is just like a chef for our family also has the same opinion. But I am tell her since the beginning that mom, it will work for me because I don't need to cook a lot. I saw many DIY videos on social media where even they are using ceramic pans to boil eggs etc on induction hob.

    Or maybe I misunderstood.

    Seriously, there is one use case (wok) where it doesn't work; and it works for everything else. I use that one use case too much so will be sticking with gas for as long as possible; but that's just what I cook.

    Nearly all ceramic cookware has steel plate either on the bottom or inside so it works on induction.

    If you already have a hob, just use whatever you have.


  • Registered Users Posts: 249 ✭✭SixtaWalthers


    Ryath wrote: »
    Ikea 365 products are very good quality for the money. This set would cover most peoples needs.

    https://www.ikea.com/ie/en/p/ikea-365-5-piece-cookware-set-10368875/

    No doubt, they are looking very durable stainless steel cookware. I need to share with my mother.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,530 ✭✭✭wandererz


    OP, getting an induction stove/hob isn't going to make anything better or easier for you.

    I would recommend getting an electric pressure cooker first like a Pressure King Pro or Instant Pot.
    You can get one delivered from Amazon for €100 or less.

    Search YouTube for those names above.

    You literally throw in the ingredients, close, set a cooking time and open and plate when finished.

    Food cooked in 5-20mins.

    Get one of those, get a wok and you probably have an oven already. So you have everything you need.

    If you're in a spending mode, get a Philips Airfryer as well.
    Lidl has a Salter brand airfryer right now for €49.99.

    By the way, perhaps there was a translation error when they mentioned induction. They may not mean an induction stove/hob.
    They may mean an induction cooker like the Airfryer I mentioned above.

    An induction stove/hob will NOT significantly speed up or improve your cooking.
    But an induction fryer or a pressure cooker definitely Will ease your cooking.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,530 ✭✭✭wandererz


    Have a look at this video.
    With the Airfryer it takes 5mins longer to cook. But just look at how simple it is and less mess, less minding and you just need less than a teaspoon of oil. Oil drains to the bottom so it is healthier.

    Baggged oven fries and other foods don't need any oil at all.

    https://youtu.be/lxQMwLV5rjs


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  • Registered Users Posts: 19,879 ✭✭✭✭cnocbui


    L1011 wrote: »
    I think all cookware sold in IKEA is stainless steel, which works on induction.

    You can't do proper wok cooking on an induction hob (anyone who comes in to post that they do - you don't, you're using the wok as a big frying pan. Sorry); but that is not really a concern unless you actually want to do that. You need a high power gas burner for it.

    There are no other real disadvantages.

    Wock-induction-hob.jpg

    Apart from the induction wok hob, you are mostly correct regarding woks. I happen to have a very rare beast which is a De Dietrich hob that has two gas rings and two induction plates. The large gas ring is 3600 kw and works well with a wok, but having used gas, induction, halogen, solids and coils, induction is the best by far. To say there are no other advantages doesn't get with my 20 years of cooking on one.

    If I were the OP, I'd have a look at this, or find something similar: https://www.amazon.de/WMF-Induktionskochfeld-Leistungsstufen-Topferkennung-Timer-Funktion/dp/B07GTWKNC5/ref=sr_1_14?__mk_de_DE=%C3%85M%C3%85%C5%BD%C3%95%C3%91&crid=2SM9GKS8OWK86&dchild=1&keywords=induction+hob&qid=1589489275&sprefix=induction%2Caps%2C160&sr=8-14

    One element isn't really enough, IMO.

    There are two types od stainless steel, one works on induction hobs, while the other doesn't, though they often fit a magnetic SS disc in the bottom so that they do.


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,615 ✭✭✭✭Muahahaha


    L1011 wrote: »
    I think all cookware sold in IKEA is stainless steel, which works on induction.

    You can't do proper wok cooking on an induction hob (anyone who comes in to post that they do - you don't, you're using the wok as a big frying pan. Sorry); but that is not really a concern unless you actually want to do that. You need a high power gas burner for it.

    There are no other real disadvantages.

    I remember you mentioned this before so out of interest I tested it out a few weeks back. The induction stovetop I have has a power boost function that outputs 3,200 watts on the main hob. With that in use the infra red thermometer returned a reading of 335 degrees C on the base and half way up the woks wall it was 260c and at the very top it was 210c. I found that overkill in heat terms as no matter what oil you use it is going to smoke like crazy when the base is heated to 335c. Plus at those heats the garlic went from raw to golden to almost burnt very very quickly.

    Ive found that wok cooking on induction is fine, my fear about it had been that only the base would have heat but I've found that heat is also radiating up the walls of the wok too. This is a carbon steel wok Im using so not sure if that makes a difference somehow. In a 3-4 minute wok cook I would usually toss it twice or three times as well as ensuring ingrediests are moving with a spatula. Then at the end I add the sauce and as soon as that carmelises within a few seconds Im tossing it three times to coat everything and then its straight off the heat anyway.

    Before I got induction I had it in my mind that I might get an outdoor wok burner set up with one of those crazy outputs like 10,000 BTUs. But now Ive been wok cooking on induction pretty much weekly for a good few months I dont see any need for it at all, the results from induction are more than satisfactory for me anyway.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,155 ✭✭✭The_Honeybadger


    Have used induction job for a few years, the control you have with them is excellent and they are quicker to heat up than electric. Op is not clear about whether they already have another type of hob but if they do it’s not worth upgrading unless their existing one breaks. I’d agree wok cooking does not compare to gas but it’s still perfectly fine and the other advantages of induction still make it the best option for domestic cooking imo.

    Would second the recommendations on the air fryer and instant pot. We have both in our house and they are used all the time.

    Op get a cookbook with some simple recipes or just google and print out some simple and tasty recipes of your favourite takeaway foods. That will do a lot more for you than changing your hob. Cooking can be very enjoyable and rewarding and will save you a lot of money if you tend to eat out a lot. Once you get a bit of confidence in the kitchen you won’t want to eat out as much.


  • Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 67,913 Mod ✭✭✭✭L1011


    cnocbui wrote: »
    To say there are no other advantages doesn't get with my 20 years of cooking on one..

    I said there were no other disadvantages...
    Muahahaha wrote: »
    I remember you mentioned this before so out of interest I tested it out a few weeks back. The induction stovetop I have has a power boost function that outputs 3,200 watts on the main hob. With that in use the infra red thermometer returned a reading of 335 degrees C on the base and half way up the woks wall it was 260c and at the very top it was 210c. I found that overkill in heat terms as no matter what oil you use it is going to smoke like crazy when the base is heated to 335c. Plus at those heats the garlic went from raw to golden to almost burnt very very quickly.

    Ive found that wok cooking on induction is fine, my fear about it had been that only the base would have heat but I've found that heat is also radiating up the walls of the wok too. This is a carbon steel wok Im using so not sure if that makes a difference somehow. In a 3-4 minute wok cook I would usually toss it twice or three times as well as ensuring ingrediests are moving with a spatula. Then at the end I add the sauce and as soon as that carmelises within a few seconds Im tossing it three times to coat everything and then its straight off the heat anyway.

    Before I got induction I had it in my mind that I might get an outdoor wok burner set up with one of those crazy outputs like 10,000 BTUs. But now Ive been wok cooking on induction pretty much weekly for a good few months I dont see any need for it at all, the results from induction are more than satisfactory for me anyway.

    You're basically using the wok as a large frying pan there, though.

    The time the wok is in the air off the hob its getting no heat; on gas it does.

    There's also claims about some of the flavour elements coming from vapourised and even burnt fats from the air during tossing, which won't happen with induction as the pan is all that's being heated. You can go the blowtorch route though :pac:


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,615 ✭✭✭✭Muahahaha


    L1011 wrote: »
    I said there were no other disadvantages...



    You're basically using the wok as a large frying pan there, though.

    The time the wok is in the air off the hob its getting no heat; on gas it does.

    There's also claims about some of the flavour elements coming from vapourised and even burnt fats from the air during tossing, which won't happen with induction as the pan is all that's being heated. You can go the blowtorch route though :pac:

    Yeah I just find no discernible difference from when I was cooking on gas. For sure when you toss a wok on induction it is getting no heat. But when I toss its not like it goes stone cold in a split second, theres still tons of heat in it. Maybe it goes from 335c down to 300c in that two seconds it takes to toss it, I must test it out of interest.


  • Registered Users Posts: 16,813 ✭✭✭✭the beer revolu


    L1011 wrote: »
    I said there were no other disadvantages...



    You're basically using the wok as a large frying pan there, though.

    I'd be interested in hearing your theory on what's the difference between a wok and a large frying pan. (apart from the obvious shape difference)


  • Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 67,913 Mod ✭✭✭✭L1011


    I'd be interested in hearing your theory on what's the difference between a wok and a large frying pan. (apart from the obvious shape difference)

    The shape difference is the entirety of it. The sides provide more surface area that is getting heat (when on gas)

    If you're mostly or solely just moving/turning food around with a utensil it's more practical to do it in a conventional frying pan. And in that case, induct away to your heart's content.


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