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New to Cycling - Tubeless Issue

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  • 30-04-2020 5:00pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 225 ✭✭


    Hello all,

    First and foremost, I am blank canvas with regard to cycling.

    I bought a Giant SL Contend 2 Disc about 14 months ago on the advice of a colleague, a keen and competitive cyclist.

    In recent weeks, the rear tyre has been losing air at a steady pace. In the sense that I would have to inflate it every time I use it and when I get back, it is noticably softer.

    I was told it was the inner tube by another colleague and took it to the only local bicycle repair shop, where I was informed by the elderly gentleman that it was tubeless and he didn't have what he needed to repair it.

    After a couple of trips back down to him and a couple of delays (and €20), I'm exactly where I started. The rear tyre is still deflating, and now quite sticky after being filled with whatever substance he used.

    Also, there was a small bit of bubbling where the rim meets the tyre when I brought it home.

    Halfords is closed at the moment with the current situation.

    Is there anything I can do, or do I just need to sit tight until Halfords reopens?

    Cheers


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 12,235 ✭✭✭✭Cee-Jay-Cee


    So you’ve no idea what sealant he used in the tyre?

    What pressure are you pumping the tyres to? You could try pumping it up very high (80+ psi) in an attempt to get the tyre to seat properly and leave it overnight. Once your satisfied it has sealed and not leaking air deflate it down to whatever pressure you normally run in them.

    If that doesn’t work then I guess wait till your nearest bike shop opens or ask someone experienced in tubeless tyres to have a look.


  • Registered Users Posts: 710 ✭✭✭mad turnip


    I don't really consider this a proper solution but you can just dump the sealant from the tire and put in a tube. Or even just put in a tube and not dump the sealant. Tubeless is great and all and I run it on my mountain bike but I do think its a bit overkill for a road bike.
    Also, there was a small bit of bubbling where the rim meets the tyre when I brought it home.
    Your comment here suggests the rim might have taken a hit enough so its not straight. If the rim has taken a big enough hit to be leaking air its not the simplest fix.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,033 ✭✭✭who_ru


    Mister-M5 wrote: »
    Hello all,

    First and foremost, I am blank canvas with regard to cycling.

    I bought a Giant SL Contend 2 Disc about 14 months ago on the advice of a colleague, a keen and competitive cyclist.

    In recent weeks, the rear tyre has been losing air at a steady pace. In the sense that I would have to inflate it every time I use it and when I get back, it is noticably softer.

    I was told it was the inner tube by another colleague and took it to the only local bicycle repair shop, where I was informed by the elderly gentleman that it was tubeless and he didn't have what he needed to repair it.

    After a couple of trips back down to him and a couple of delays (and €20), I'm exactly where I started. The rear tyre is still deflating, and now quite sticky after being filled with whatever substance he used.

    Also, there was a small bit of bubbling where the rim meets the tyre when I brought it home.

    Halfords is closed at the moment with the current situation.

    Is there anything I can do, or do I just need to sit tight until Halfords reopens?

    Cheers
    welcome to the world of tubeless riding. it sounds like there is a decent sized nick in the tire and the sealant isn't filling it because the hole might be too big. if you're consistently losing pressure, which the sealant should prevent, it's probably time for a new tire and fresh sealant. there are plenty of videos on youtube on how to fit a tubeless tire or you could get your LBS to fit it.

    remember tubeless requires less pressure - maybe 90psi max.


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 24,565 Mod ✭✭✭✭CramCycle


    mad turnip wrote: »
    I don't really consider this a proper solution but you can just dump the sealant from the tire and put in a tube. Or even just put in a tube and not dump the sealant. Tubeless is great and all and I run it on my mountain bike but I do think its a bit overkill for a road bike.
    Having seen a tubeless tyre roll of a tube, I would be reluctant to do this.
    Your comment here suggests the rim might have taken a hit enough so its not straight. If the rim has taken a big enough hit to be leaking air its not the simplest fix.
    Could the OP put up some pics of the issue?


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,069 ✭✭✭✭fryup


    when we say tubeless, are we talking about solid rubber tyres like tannus?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 7,224 ✭✭✭CantGetNoSleep


    fryup wrote: »
    when we say tubeless, are we talking about solid rubber tyres like tannus?
    No more like a car tire - has air inside but no tube.


  • Registered Users Posts: 225 ✭✭Mister-M5


    Thanks for all of the replies, I will take a closer look at the tyre today and post some pics.

    I'm sure you'll get a laugh from my efforts to identify the issue :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,761 ✭✭✭Effects


    Have you tried submerging in water to find the leak, like in the bath?
    I've had issues with tubeless leaking around the valve before myself.
    I'm still not completely sold on tubeless. But it's also worked out well for me in a few occasions.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,227 ✭✭✭ratracer


    I bought a set of Mavic tubeless wheels after spotting a deal on here awhile back. Folks here have had different experiences of them, but I have to say I’m a big fan and have had no real issues with them, apart from a tyre replacement.

    IME: Tubeless tyres need to be put on the rim and inflated until you hear them ‘pop’. Then take the valves out, inject the right amount of sealant, replace the valve, inflate to correct pressure (6 bar) and give the wheels a spin to move the sealant around. It’s straight forward. When I had a puncture that needed the tyre replaced, I also noted a lot of gunk on the frame at the time. It cleans off easy enough. The leak/ bubbles at the rim would suggest to me that the tyre hasn’t been properly seated (the ‘pop’), assuming there is no sign of damage to the rim.


  • Registered Users Posts: 36,167 ✭✭✭✭ED E


    I'll probably get flak for this but - no newbie should be running tubeless. We've enough problems with experienced club members that do none of their own maintenance getting them nevermind someone who is totally green.

    Convert back to regular tyres, get a toolbag, carry c02 and tubes + boot, be able to get yourself home if you hit some louts beer bottle in the arse of Wicklow.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 259 ✭✭uncle-mofo


    I thought that "tubeless" Giant bikes shipped with a tubeless rim and tyre, but with a tube inside to save the shops the hassle of getting them set up, maintaining sealant while bikes sit on the shop floor etc.

    If it's causing you this much heart ache, I'd take the tyre off and either remove the tubeless valve and put in a tube, or replace the tube that's already in there.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,033 ✭✭✭who_ru


    uncle-mofo wrote: »
    I thought that "tubeless" Giant bikes shipped with a tubeless rim and tyre, but with a tube inside to save the shops the hassle of getting them set up, maintaining sealant while bikes sit on the shop floor etc.

    If it's causing you this much heart ache, I'd take the tyre off and either remove the tubeless valve and put in a tube, or replace the tube that's already in there.

    there won't be a tube in there already, a tube can be installed alright. i think most people's experience with tubeless involves getting a flat, not being fully prepared for dealing with a flat on the road (carry a tube if needs be) and losing patience with the tubeless set up because they did not prepare for the eventuality of a flat.

    on my previous bike i did approx 2500km on tubeless, i got a cut in the rear tyre once which the sealant couldn't seal. other than that i had no flats, the front tyre never went flat.

    so overall tubeless has been good for me. at the moment on my 2nd tubeless bike (Giant) i have a tiny hole on the front tyre which the sealant sealed, i didn't notice this until after a spin. I have since inflated that tyre to approx 80psi, went out for a 60km spin with no issues whatsoever because the sealant did exactly what it is meant to do - stop unnecessary punctures or flats.

    but yes mounting a tubeless tyre can be a lot of work, it's faster fitting a tube and inflating. but tubeless is comfortable, overall works very well in my opinion but you have to prepare for a flat and be able to deal with it. i don't carry co2 canisters, just some 'worms' to fill a large cut if it happens and a micro pump which should see me home if it all goes pete tong on the road.


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