Advertisement
If you have a new account but are having problems posting or verifying your account, please email Niamh on [email protected] for help. Thanks :)
New AMA with a US police officer (he's back!). You can ask your questions here

And the circle is completed

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 10,567 ✭✭✭✭ Thelonious Monk


    Hopefully they just cancel it for good this time. Road building is the only infrastructure that matters in Ireland and wins votes.


  • Registered Users Posts: 233 ✭✭ AAAAAAAAA


    Austerity is all FG knows how to do. Doesn't matter how many times we're shown that forcing money into the economy through major infrastructure is the actual way to do it, they won't learn.


  • Registered Users Posts: 20,363 ✭✭✭✭ Podge_irl


    "It's possible Shane that some of those projects may be differed for reasons that are beyond my control.

    "For reasons that, for example, large companies might decide themselves regarding do they want to stay in procurement processes, are they still in a position to deliver against commitments they've made with governments?

    "So that possibility is there."

    "The reason for that is when I say capital commitments... of course that's code for what we mean about housing, what we mean about improving public transport and so on.

    "And those things - not only are they really important socially - but they're also an essential element of how we can rebuild our economy.

    "But it will take some time to become clear on exactly what will be able to go ahead - because there are many things that are changing at the moment that are beyond our control".

    Way to massively misrepresent what he said. There is not even an iota of an indication that the govt would look to defer the projects.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,229 ✭✭✭ LeinsterDub


    Podge_irl wrote: »
    Way to massively misrepresent what he said. There is not even an iota of an indication that the govt would look to defer the projects.

    Mark my words this is just the opening salvo. These projects will be the first to cut


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,440 ✭✭✭✭ Cookiemunster


    Mark my words this is just the opening salvo. These projects will be the first to cut

    I listened to the interview live this morning. Shane Coleman was trying to drive him to say that we'd have to have more austerity and cut back. He refuted this and said the only possible delays would be caused by contractor issues.

    I'd advise actually listening to the audio of the interview at the bottom of the article rather than just reading the headline.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 20,363 ✭✭✭✭ Podge_irl


    Mark my words this is just the opening salvo. These projects will be the first to cut

    I don't have the energy or time to mark all the tedious words of doom around the infrastructure projects.

    You have nonetheless gotten both the tone and content of the comments of Donohoe utterly incorrect.


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 42,885 Mod ✭✭✭✭ magicbastarder


    of course if pressed on 'is X going to go ahead', he's going to couch his words. he'd be mad not to.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,229 ✭✭✭ LeinsterDub


    I listened to the interview live this morning. Shane Coleman was trying to drive him to say that we'd have to have more austerity and cut back. He refuted this and said the only possible delays would be caused by contractor issues.

    I'd advise actually listening to the audio of the interview at the bottom of the article rather than just reading the headline.

    I've listened to it and I took some comfort in his comments. However we've all been here before. When the purse strings need to be tightened it will be PT that will suffer.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,229 ✭✭✭ LeinsterDub


    Podge_irl wrote: »
    I don't have the energy or time to mark all the tedious words of doom around the infrastructure projects.

    You have nonetheless gotten both the tone and content of the comments of Donohoe utterly incorrect.

    I didn't comment on his tone. Just thought it was noteworthy. The thin end of the wedge started today


  • Registered Users Posts: 20,363 ✭✭✭✭ Podge_irl


    I've listened to it and I took some comfort in his comments. However we've all been here before. When the purse strings need to be tightened it will be PT that will suffer.

    And, yet again, there is zero indication that there will be any tightening of purse strings. If anything the exact opposite is what was professed.
    I didn't comment on his tone. Just thought it was noteworthy. The thin end of the wedge started today

    To correctly paraphrase him - we desperately need this and it will be vital to restarting our economy but external contractors may have issues fulfilling agreed contracts given the situation. You didn't comment on his tone, but by, in any way, putting this forth as an indication that they are even remotely considering cancelling or postponing as a choice you are wildly misrepresenting what was actually said.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 8,229 ✭✭✭ LeinsterDub


    Podge_irl wrote: »
    And, yet again, there is zero indication that there will be any tightening of purse strings. If anything the exact opposite is what was professed.



    To correctly paraphrase him - we desperately need this and it will be vital to restarting our economy but external contractors may have issues fulfilling agreed contracts given the situation. You didn't comment on his tone, but by, in any way, putting this forth as an indication that they are even remotely considering cancelling or postponing as a choice you are wildly misrepresenting what was actually said.

    Perhaps i've let 30 years of disappointment cloud my judgement however the generic
    It's possible Shane that some of those projects may be differed for reasons that are beyond my control.
    sets my alarm bells ringing . Reason such as the economy perhap?


  • Registered Users Posts: 20,363 ✭✭✭✭ Podge_irl


    sets my alarm bells ringing . Reason such as the economy perhap?
    "For reasons that, for example, large companies might decide themselves regarding do they want to stay in procurement processes, are they still in a position to deliver against commitments they've made with governments?

    "So that possibility is there."

    "But my intention going into this is to try to preserve as much of our big capital commitments as I can.

    He literally mentions the reasons he is talking about and it is to do with contractors being unable to fulfil contracts that have been set for them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 917 ✭✭✭ gjim


    AAAAAAAAA wrote: »
    Austerity is all FG knows how to do. Doesn't matter how many times we're shown that forcing money into the economy through major infrastructure is the actual way to do it, they won't learn.
    Arguable - Ireland recovered much faster than the likes of Greece who deferred adjusting spending until it was too late.

    People use the word "austerity" as if it were a lifestyle choice like going on a fad diet - or it's just an ideological choice on the part of politicians. In reality a country gets into a situation where the government is taking in far less money than it's spending and the only way to cover the gap is to borrow at stressed (moneylender rates) rates in the bond markets. The latter is just deferring the inevitable. And anyway, you cannot "stimulate" an economy in lock down. The world is entering a very novel period.

    Borrowing money is justifiable if there a credible path for paying it back (normally the expectation of economic growth) but at this moment - even at what look like low rates - it would be especially risky given the poor outlook for growth.

    Outside of political sloganeering, there is no way to avoid the simple arithmetic of the situation as the Greeks found out after the GFC - it's easy to promise to keep spending but it's impossible to deliver on that promise regardless of a government's political leanings. A more mature political environment would allow rational discussion of how to prioritise spending when there simply isn't enough money available for everything.

    Anyway the elephant in the room is that there is close to a million people receiving 350 a week - that's 1 billion every 3 weeks. That's spending money at a rate close to (or greater than currently) the normal rate of income tax receipts. In one year, that's a Metrolink, Dart expension and a DU.

    Hate to be pessimistic but what's happening at the moment is unprecedented. When the stresses start to appear, big infrastructure projects will be the first to get the chop.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,229 ✭✭✭ LeinsterDub


    Podge_irl wrote: »
    He literally mentions the reasons he is talking about and it is to do with contractors being unable to fulfil contracts that have been set for them.

    I listened to the interview I know the reasons he listed by concern is that soon other reason will be added to that list


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 42,885 Mod ✭✭✭✭ magicbastarder


    Reason such as the economy perhap?
    yes, it's quite possible that whatever happens the economy in the next six months/12 months may push out the building of the metro.
    but to expect the minister to commit to building it on the expected timetable when the globe is facing its biggest pandemic in a century, and with unemployment leaping at rates not seen in modern history, to be fair, is not something you're going to get too many people up in arms about.

    people will be more concerned about having a job to go to, than they will be about what means will take them to it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,229 ✭✭✭ LeinsterDub



    people will be more concerned about having a job to go to, than they will be about what means will take them to it.

    And thus we've waited 40 years to string up some overhead cables


Advertisement