Advertisement
If you have a new account but are having problems posting or verifying your account, please email us on [email protected] for help. Thanks :)
Hello all! Please ensure that you are posting a new thread or question in the appropriate forum. The Feedback forum is overwhelmed with questions that are having to be moved elsewhere. If you need help to verify your account contact [email protected]

Why is food so much worse after being frozen?

  • 09-03-2020 1:31pm
    #1
    Closed Accounts Posts: 2,913 ✭✭✭ Mathias Deep Mark


    Genuine question. Why is it that if I freeze veg or fish it never tastes or cooks as well as if I had cooked from fresh, is it to do with water retention?


Comments



  • Genuine question. Why is it that if I freeze veg or fish it never tastes or cooks as well as if I had cooked from fresh, is it to do with water retention?

    Some things don't freeze well. When freezing, its important to remove as much air as possible from the container. I find things in a sauce freeze very well. Lasagna being a good example. Stews also freeze well. I'd never freeze fish that had already been cooked.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,913 ✭✭✭ Mathias Deep Mark


    Some things don't freeze well. When freezing, its important to remove as much air as possible from the container. I find things in a sauce freeze very well. Lasagna being a good example. Stews also freeze well. I'd never freeze fish that had already been cooked.

    Sometimes I buy frozen gambas from supermarket which are already cooked and just need to be heated in a pan but they always have a more rubbery texture.

    Also, onions and mushrooms are terrible after they've been frozen!


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,201 ✭✭✭cruizer101


    When you freeze something and the water in it turns into ice it expands. This expansion can break the cell walls damaging the item being frozen.
    This happens more when you home freeze as opposed to factory frozen food which is blast chilled, this freezes it quicker and leads to less damage.

    The other thing that can happen is items loose moisture, you would see this on chicken breasts if not fully wrapped and sealed.




  • Sometimes I buy frozen gambas from supermarket which are already cooked and just need to be heated in a pan but they always have a more rubbery texture.

    Also, onions and mushrooms are terrible after they've been frozen!

    Funnily enough I buy frozen diced onion which is perfect, but its blast chilled.

    Id recommend using the mushrooms in some kind of sauce, or stock and freezing that. In fact if you only want a small bit of mushroom in dishes, I'd pour the mushroom stock into one of those plastic bag ice cube forms, then you can just add one or two cubes to a dish when you're making it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,069 ✭✭✭phormium


    Anything with a high water content does not freeze well in a domestic freezer. I freeze loads of stuff but I would never freeze mushrooms for example as they don't do well. I only freeze certain veg and they have to be prepped right first, I freeze a lot of cabbage/turnip/peppers/celery, brocolli an odd time but it is not as good from frozen, I don't like the texture of frozen carrot but if bought already frozen it's better. I love mushy peas and freeze them cooked as they take so long to cook. Mashed potato freezes great too once you reheat it properly.

    Fish is not great but I would use it for fish pies and the like, not as just a piece on it's own, fish bought already frozen is usually much better due to the freezing method.

    I have two freezers and would buy some frozen veg like green beans/peas but most of the stuff I freeze myself, would always have a supply of meat/bread/milk/veg/berries and a lot of cake/tart :)


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 19,462 ✭✭✭✭Muahahaha


    I wonder does the method of reheating frozen food make a difference. Presumably most people reheat in a microwave but wonder would reheating slower in an oven make any difference to taste/flavour?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,913 ✭✭✭ Mathias Deep Mark


    phormium wrote: »
    Anything with a high water content does not freeze well in a domestic freezer. I freeze loads of stuff but I would never freeze mushrooms for example as they don't do well. I only freeze certain veg and they have to be prepped right first, I freeze a lot of cabbage/turnip/peppers/celery, brocolli an odd time but it is not as good from frozen, I don't like the texture of frozen carrot but if bought already frozen it's better. I love mushy peas and freeze them cooked as they take so long to cook. Mashed potato freezes great too once you reheat it properly.

    Fish is not great but I would use it for fish pies and the like, not as just a piece on it's own, fish bought already frozen is usually much better due to the freezing method.

    I have two freezers and would buy some frozen veg like green beans/peas but most of the stuff I freeze myself, would always have a supply of meat/bread/milk/veg/berries and a lot of cake/tart :)

    Why do you freeze milk? Can butter be frozen?


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,069 ✭✭✭phormium


    Convenience, saves having to go to the shop as often for some. Butter also freezes fine, either real butter or spreads in tubs, all fine in freezer.

    Actually when my father was alive I bought a small second hand extra freezer for his house and filled it every two weeks or so with milk/bread and some spreads. It saved a lot of shopping on a regular basis for the essentials.

    On the reheating query, the microwave is fine if you do it right. For example something like mashed potato should be heated in a glass bowl with plenty of room and given a couple of stirs while heating and should be well fluffed up again and then it will be like fresh. Where it's horrible is if you just heat a scoop of mash say on a plate until hot and eat it as is, it's always a bit firm and you are slicing off bits rather than having lovely fluffy mash, you must mash it up again which distributes the heat better and lightens it. Also when freezing it make it tasty, plenty salt/pepper, bit of butter and I like some green onions too, I also don't mash as such but use an electric hand mixer to make nice fluffy mash :)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,913 ✭✭✭ Mathias Deep Mark


    A few more suggestions on this topic would be useful in light of current circumstances.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,069 ✭✭✭phormium


    I'm eating almost exclusively from the freezer these days with a few exceptions. I haven't been shopping since early last week and won't be going for at least the two weeks of lockdown we have. Fortunately I had well stocked up weeks ago with milk especially which is what it seems most people have to go for regularly. Bread I can make as needed and freeze some as well.

    Only thing I don't have is fresh fruit but I have lots of frozen berries and some tinned pears and can use them for several desserts :) Loads of stewed apple too from last years crop of apples.
    Not much in the line of salad either but can live without that!

    I bought potatoes when they were a Lidl special weeks ago and froze mash and potato wedges, still have some left and want to use up cream so will make garlic/cream potato and freeze that in portions. If you have a bit of smoked salmon it's delicious layered up between the layers of potato too.

    I bought lots of mince and have some frozen raw, more frozen as burgers (burger buns made and frozen) and some cooked into meat loaf and frozen in slices to provide quick dinners. Yesterday was mash/meat loaf/cabbage, cooked fresh spuds in but rest was frozen. Cabbage was cooked in a saucepan with little water/knob of butter and meat loaf heated in microwave. Microwave is not the answer to all reheating, some things do better other ways to make them taste as fresh. I will run out of lettuce/tomato for my burgers but like onion/gherkins on them too so plenty of those.

    I also have a lot of chicken fillets and pieces, I get a txt from local butcher with specials and the week it's chicken fillets I usually buy 20, I freeze some whole, some I flatten and stuff and roll up in bacon, I cut some into pieces and freeze them loosely on a sheet of parchment, when frozen then I pack them in bags so I can just fry as many as needed straight from frozen for a curry or stir fry, always have peppers chopped and frozen and celery for curries/stews.

    All this is no good of course if you don't have a decent size freezer or two and probably too late to buy one anywhere.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 8,779 ✭✭✭Carawaystick


    Can butter be frozen?
    Butter is frozen at fridge temperature, it melts at about 25-30 degrees.

    I've bought squid and langoutines inside a layer of clear water ice before, I presume its to prevent freezer burn or freezing damage


Advertisement