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DeFacto Visa

  • 03-03-2020 8:56am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 626 ✭✭✭ Mr.Fantastic


    Hi,

    I made a thread on this before but myself and my partner are hoping to go to melbourne next year and she has oz citizenship from birth?

    Just looking at it, its around 4 thousand euro with no remit if your application fails?

    Anyone any tips on this?

    I should be okay to get a job I work for a large IT place and she is a nurse.

    Would I be better of paying for someone to apply for me e.g a USIT job?

    I also heard it takes up to a year?

    Thanks for anyone any advice on this


Comments



  • I did this years ago, on the basis of marriage rather than a de facto partnership, but the process and the rules are pretty similar.

    I did it without involving a migration agent. It took many months, and it was a fairly hostile process. But there wasn't much doubt but that our application would be successful; we had been married for about seven years at that stage, and had had two kids, and there was really nothing about our application that would raise an eyebrow. More to the point, in those days it didn't cost 4k - just a few hundred euros. So even if I had stuffed it up somehow and had to start all over again and pay a second fee, that wouldn't have been a disaster.

    If I were doing it now, I think I would involve a migration agent, if only for peace of mind.




  • Peregrinus wrote: »
    I did this years ago, on the basis of marriage rather than a de facto partnership, but the process and the rules are pretty similar.

    I did it without involving a migration agent. It took many months, and it was a fairly hostile process. But there wasn't much doubt but that our application would be successful; we had been married for about seven years at that stage, and had had two kids, and there was really nothing about our application that would raise an eyebrow. More to the point, in those days it didn't cost 4k - just a few hundred euros. So even if I had stuffed it up somehow and had to start all over again and pay a second fee, that wouldn't have been a disaster.

    If I were doing it now, I think I would involve a migration agent, if only for peace of mind.

    Yeah we are together nearly four years so I say have no issue with the validity of it.

    Also the price of it is making me worry, I suppose the migration agent might be the way to go , as I heard they can offer some refund if it goes wrong.

    Think its an extra 2 k to get them involved though.

    A lot of money and even got there yet.




  • I did it about 8 years ago.
    No massive issue.

    Joint bank accounts and as much evidence as you can gather.

    it takes a long time to process, but they won't refuse a genuine case.

    From what I remember, it involves a bridging visa B, which only gives you the same working rights as the visa you are currently on if you apply onshore.
    i.e if you apply while on a tourist visa, you won't be able to work.

    Mine took 18 months to do and during this time I had to keep my medical and police clearance certs up to date, so it was a bit of a rigmarole, but its stress free once the forms are filled in. You will definitely get it.




  • Also note that they generally dont just flat out refuse visas, especially if yours is a genuine application. If there's anything missing from your application or if they have any questions they'll contact you and give you a chance to provide what they are looking for.




  • Noo wrote: »
    Also note that they generally dont just flat out refuse visas, especially if yours is a genuine application. If there's anything missing from your application or if they have any questions they'll contact you and give you a chance to provide what they are looking for.

    Yeah I was afraid if everything wasn't in properly they would just refuse it. Good to know have to get all the documents in order will make a move for it this summer.

    Excited to go anyway


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  • Do it yourself. It's literally just filling out forms. Agents don't improve your chances at all.

    I did it about 7 years ago, literally on the last day of my WHV. I met my Australian partner even before coming over here. I was granted a bridging visa right away. This allows you to live, work, stay in Australia. The only caveat is you can't leave and re-enter without changing your bridging visa type to leave and it reverts back when you re-enter. Not a huge deal.

    You will stay on your bridging visa for around 1 year depending on processing time after submitting all your documents, lots of documents.

    Then you get moved to your temporary partner visa while you then have to resubmit all the same documents you submitted before to apply for your permanent partner visa (so keep all your documents safe and handy to resubmit) and include any new evidence of an ongoing, committed relationship.

    You'll stay on your temporary partner visa for about a year or so, again depending on processing times. Then one day, you get an email saying your permanent partner visa has been granted, which means you are a permanent resident.

    Once your relationship is legitimate, you have all phone records, emails, photos, social medias, travel bookings, shared addresses where you've lived together (if possible) you can submit then its very unlikely you won't get it granted and no need to stress.




  • If you aren't over here already, you can still apply from outside Australia. Once its granted, the minute you land, you'll be on your bridging visa, or, depending on the time frame when you arrive, say a year or so, you could already have your temporary partner visa granted already.

    I made the mistake of NOT resubmitting everything again for my permanent partner visa.....because it was all the same stuff I'd already submitted. In my mind, I was thinking they had all that information already. This is not the case as it was an application for an entirely new visa. I found this out when I got an email saying I had 28 days to submit all my remaining paperwork. Even then, I was able to request an extension on things and it wasn't that stressful or difficult.


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