Advertisement
If you have a new account but are having problems posting or verifying your account, please email us on hello@boards.ie for help. Thanks :)
Hello all! Please ensure that you are posting a new thread or question in the appropriate forum. The Feedback forum is overwhelmed with questions that are having to be moved elsewhere. If you need help to verify your account contact hello@boards.ie

Builders to have look at potential house purchases?

Options
  • 15-02-2020 9:45pm
    #1
    Posts: 18,749 ✭✭✭✭


    Hi, I am looking at properties to buy at the moment.
    Most of them need work.
    I don't know any builders, not do I have any in my family, or close circle!
    How do people find builders just to have a preview of a property?
    I need to find approx prices for the work that needs doing. I can't even offer on houses unless I know how much the work will cost?


Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 12,653 ✭✭✭✭Plumbthedepths


    bubblypop wrote: »
    Hi, I am looking at properties to buy at the moment.
    Most of them need work.
    I don't know any builders, not do I have any in my family, or close circle!
    How do people find builders just to have a preview of a property?
    I need to find approx prices for the work that needs doing. I can't even offer on houses unless I know how much the work will cost?

    Look for builders in the area you are looking to buy. Check out reviews online when you find one.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,065 ✭✭✭tuisginideach


    Are there work colleagues who have had building work done? What about where you currently live - ask neighbours etc for recommendations. But remember - the builder deserves to be paid for his time and work - 'will you have a quick look?' isn't a five minute job! Some people seem to feel that 'that quick look' or 'snagging' by an acquaintance is free!


  • Posts: 18,749 ✭✭✭✭ [Deleted User]


    Oh absolutely, I would pay them for their time & opinion!
    I would really only get them for a house I was serious about, once I got an approx cost I could then put in an offer, get a survey & proper quote done.


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,987 ✭✭✭✭Del2005


    bubblypop wrote: »
    Oh absolutely, I would pay them for their time & opinion!
    I would really only get them for a house I was serious about, once I got an approx cost I could then put in an offer, get a survey & proper quote done.

    The surveyor should pick up any issues and you can then get prices from builders for the work. Getting a builder in before you even know if the property is worth buying, you need to have the drains checked etc, isn't a good idea especially since you are paying for the builders time.


  • Posts: 18,749 ✭✭✭✭ [Deleted User]


    Del2005 wrote: »
    The surveyor should pick up any issues and you can then get prices from builders for the work. Getting a builder in before you even know if the property is worth buying, you need to have the drains checked etc, isn't a good idea especially since you are paying for the builders time.

    Like I pointed out, I need to have an approx cost of works, so I know if I can afford to offer on a house & do the works.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 5,890 ✭✭✭Bullocks


    bubblypop wrote: »
    Like I pointed out, I need to have an approx cost of works, so I know if I can afford to offer on a house & do the works.

    If you have a surveyor checking the house they should be able to get a builder to give a rough estimate from their survey


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,987 ✭✭✭✭Del2005


    bubblypop wrote: »
    Like I pointed out, I need to have an approx cost of works, so I know if I can afford to offer on a house & do the works.

    First you need to know if you should bid on the house. No point in paying the builder to quote for work only to discover that the sewage and water pipes are collapsed and need to be replaced or there's a major structural defect. Find out if its worth bidding before you start planning the renovations.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,065 ✭✭✭tuisginideach


    Del2005 wrote: »
    First you need to know if you should bid on the house. No point in paying the builder to quote for work only to discover that the sewage and water pipes are collapsed and need to be replaced or there's a major structural defect. Find out if its worth bidding before you start planning the renovations.
    I think that's exactly why bubblypop is looking for a builder - to give him an idea of whether to pursue the idea of a particular house or not.


  • Registered Users Posts: 33,931 ✭✭✭✭listermint


    Any reason you are looking at houses that need alot of work.

    It's not for everyone.

    You could end up seeing 3 or 5 houses and need a builders opinion on all off them. If your very tight on cash now then buying something that needs drastic work will eat your money like gusto.

    Sometimes it's better getting into something that's done you know what your paying and no surprises.


    Some examples to mull over in relation to costs. A new heating system can be 10k. Rewire 8k, small extension i.e push kitchen and associated room out 2 or 3 meters from rear of house 70k. New roof 30k, external insulation 16k, garden 5k, bathroom refit 10k, kitchen refit 10k.


    These are guide prices depends on the property and spec but you need to be realistic , if your bidding on places to save money. Often you don't at all.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 18,958 ✭✭✭✭Shefwedfan


    Unless you have a builder and are used to renovation work is not sure it’s the best option to buy a house which needs work

    I have bought two houses, originally was in good but old condition so I lived in it for 4-5 years while I done bits before a full renovation so I knew what I was doing and had my own builder

    Second house was bought with the view of having to do up, but I was expecting a lot of work but even after all inspection etc when we started it grew a life of its own and I ended up digging out floors etc, huge investment but worth it in the end....

    Taking on a house to renovated is a challenge, no matter what you do trying to plan with naked eye will never find all the problem that are hidden in behind a wardrobe or under carpet


  • Advertisement
  • Posts: 18,749 ✭✭✭✭ [Deleted User]


    I would love to find a house I could just move into! Unfortunately, the area I'm looking at, they tend to be older houses, 40/50 years old.... Most haven't been touched!
    Anything that's remotely modernised is snapped up immediately!


  • Registered Users Posts: 33,931 ✭✭✭✭listermint


    Off the cuff example. A house in crumlin , or kimmage. Hasn't had major works since let's say the early 90s. But has all the standard stuff, old kitchen, old toilet, 3 upstairs, old aluminium windows, old door.

    You'd pour 100k into it to get it to a reasonable standard.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 18,958 ✭✭✭✭Shefwedfan


    bubblypop wrote: »
    I would love to find a house I could just move into! Unfortunately, the area I'm looking at, they tend to be older houses, 40/50 years old.... Most haven't been touched!
    Anything that's remotely modernised is snapped up immediately!

    My original house was in Dublin, built in 70’s and never touched

    Yes it was dated carpet and wallpaper etc but it was dry and warm....move in and do bits and pieces yourself....

    Second house had dry and wet rot, serious issues and that’s why it needed immediate attention...


Advertisement