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Blending stability and neutral running shoes

  • 06-02-2020 2:44pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 876 ✭✭✭ onrail


    Looking for thoughts/experiences on blending a max stability trainer for long and/or slower training runs with a neutral shoe for speed work and (all) racing?

    After a couple of months of being lazy, I'm gearing up to begin training for my first marathon in Dublin this year.

    Having had a gait analysis done a few years back, I've been told that I've a pretty strong over-pronation, requiring stability and bought my first pair of proper trainers.

    Since then, I've tended to go for more neutral offerings, believing them to be all I need over the shorter distances (5k/10k races), but I've tended to run into injury niggles any week I pushed mileage over say 50k.

    So given the distance I should be running to properly train for a marathon, I'm thinking of going back to the stability option, but keeping the neutral shoes for racing. Would this be likely to lead to injury problems, given the contrast in support?

    All opinions/experiences welcome!


Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 297 ✭✭ Kissy Lips


    It's what I do. I give myself plenty of time training in the neutral shoe to get used to it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,455 ✭✭✭ mloc123


    Work on you running form instead?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,382 ✭✭✭ FFVII


    Work on cause of over pronation?


  • Registered Users Posts: 876 ✭✭✭ onrail


    FFVII wrote: »
    Work on cause of over pronation?

    Oh I've tried :(

    Yeah it's stemming from a weakness in the hips and I've tried giving myself at least one evening of strengthening work per week, but I'm still running into injury niggles once I push up (even gradually) the mileage to above 50km, or try to run any more than two days in a row.

    Just think that's how I'm built and it'll be near impossible to correct completely


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,382 ✭✭✭ FFVII


    onrail wrote: »
    Oh I've tried :(

    Yeah it's stemming from a weakness in the hips and I've tried giving myself at least one evening of strengthening work per week, but I'm still running into injury niggles once I push up (even gradually) the mileage to above 50km, or try to run any more than two days in a row.

    Just think that's how I'm built and it'll be near impossible to correct completely

    What type of injuries?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,139 ✭✭✭ Glencarraig


    Brooks Adrenaline for the long slow stuff and Brooks Ravenna for the rest...........sorted.


  • Registered Users Posts: 876 ✭✭✭ onrail


    FFVII wrote: »
    What type of injuries?

    Right hip mainly (probable hip impingement) and 'Runners Knee'


  • Registered Users Posts: 876 ✭✭✭ onrail


    Brooks Adrenaline for the long slow stuff and Brooks Ravenna for the rest...........sorted.

    I've been looking at the Adrenalines actually - toss up between them and the Saucony Hurricanes


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,382 ✭✭✭ FFVII


    onrail wrote: »
    Right hip mainly (probable hip impingement) and 'Runners Knee'

    I wouldn't be upping mileage with either of them going on. If you can't eliminate both, forget the marathon.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,184 ✭✭✭ Ceepo


    onrail wrote: »
    Oh I've tried :(

    Yeah it's stemming from a weakness in the hips and I've tried giving myself at least one evening of strengthening work per week, but I'm still running into injury niggles once I push up (even gradually) the mileage to above 50km, or try to run any more than two days in a row.

    Just think that's how I'm built and it'll be near impossible to correct completely

    Do you think the "over pronation " caused the hip problem and runners knee,
    If so, do you think that doing what ever strength work you were doing it will fix the over pronation.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 9,455 ✭✭✭ mloc123


    Are you a forefoot, mid foot or heel striker? What cadence do you run at etc..? Imo, these are the things to look at when trying to correct pronation issues.


  • Registered Users Posts: 876 ✭✭✭ onrail


    Ceepo wrote: »
    Do you think the "over pronation " caused the hip problem and runners knee,
    If so, do you think that doing what ever strength work you were doing it will fix the over pronation.

    I've no idea to be honest - there's probably a bit of chicken&egg argument with it?


  • Registered Users Posts: 876 ✭✭✭ onrail


    mloc123 wrote: »
    Are you a forefoot, mid foot or heel striker? What cadence do you run at etc..? Imo, these are the things to look at when trying to correct pronation issues.

    I think Based on a few photos I've seen, I'm a heel striker, but have never formally had it looked at.

    Based on my Garmin outputs, cadence is relatively high - average about 185 over easy runs rising to about 195 with the faster stuff.

    I'm reluctant to have the 'gait-analysis' thing done in a running shop again, but thinking it might be worth it to get some advice?


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,455 ✭✭✭ mloc123


    onrail wrote: »
    I think Based on a few photos I've seen, I'm a heel striker, but have never formally had it looked at.

    Based on my Garmin outputs, cadence is relatively high - average about 185 over easy runs rising to about 195 with the faster stuff.

    I'm reluctant to have the 'gait-analysis' thing done in a running shop again, but thinking it might be worth it to get some advice?

    Have you access to a treadmill somewhere? If so... set up a camera (your phone would do) and record your feet running. You can determine most of the info yourself.

    If you are a heal striker, straight off that is something to work on that will make your life a whole lot easier. It takes time tho... When I started running first, after about a year or so I spent an entire winter working on form and moved from a heal striker in support shoes to a mid/forefoot runner.

    All of this is only my opinion, I am not sure if there is any science behind it but.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,623 ✭✭✭ dna_leri


    As a strategy, using a more neutral shoe for racing can work but maybe try for 5K before progressing to 10K or further

    Some other thoughts:
    There are neutral shoes, stability shoes and stuff in between. The in-between can be good for tempo/speed training.
    Can you do strength training more than once a week? Could you do 10 mins every day?
    I would also be reluctant to get "gait-analysis" done in a running shop. The main aim of most running shops is to sell you running shoes.
    A good place to start for information on running form is "Anatomy for Runners" by Jay Dicharry.
    Is there a running coach, physical therapist etc local to you that can give advice about running form - it is very hard to self-diagnose or do remotely.
    Most people over-pronate to some extent and still manage to run so don't get discouraged, there is always a way...


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,510 ✭✭✭ Murph_D


    Overpronation, heelstriking etc are natural conditions, not disabilities. The research says wear whatever shoes feel most comfortable, regardless of your pronation status. Overpronation does not in itself cause injury or impede performance. The source of your injuries is probably elsewhere.


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