Advertisement
If you have a new account but are having problems posting or verifying your account, please email us on [email protected] for help. Thanks :)
Private profiles - please note that profiles marked as private will soon be public. This will facilitate moderation so mods can view users' warning histories. All of your posts across the site will appear on your profile page (including PI, RI). Groups posts will remain private except to users who have access to the same Groups as you. Thread here
Some important site news, please read here. Thanks!

Boots - Meindl vs Hanwag vs Haix

  • 31-12-2019 6:51pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 269 ✭✭ martco


    I need a new pair of boots. Hiking/hillwalking mainly.

    past 14 years I've owned this magnificent pair of genuine German Para boots, I kept them well & they were up for anything uppers still great but on their 3rd re-soling now the cobbler tried a couple of times now but the inner shank (I think its called) is too far gone to attach a new sole. I looked into getting same boots again but no joy despite endless internetting. I've just accepted they're dead :(

    SO. I'm looking now for more regular walking/climbing boots. I know to some degree you get what you pay for & I also know the risk of buying online so I tried out a couple of different models at stockists near to me (South Dublin) but both places were definitely what I would call "highfalloutin" skiing gear places definitely overpricing & had fairly limited stock.

    Fitwise the ones I tried that seemed to fit best overall were Meindl/model Kansas/size 9.5UK 44EU but I think I need something heavier duty & looking at their catalogue the ones that seem more = to what I need are Meindl Island Active or Dovres

    I've also had Hanwag Alaska & the Haix army boot (ksk3000) suggested to me, has anyone any experience of them?

    Could someone suggest a good boot shop not too far outside Dublin to try, would prefer not to end up taking a chance online

    thanks


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 2,174 ✭✭✭ J.R.


    I have a pair of Le Chameau Mouflon GTX for hunting - I find them brilliant. The only fault I have with them is they can feel heavy on a long hike.

    For hiikng & hill walking I have a pair of Brasher Hill Master GTX...now taken over by Berghaus who continue to manufacture these boots...presumably even better.

    http://www.walking.org/equipment-reviews/walking-brand-reviews/brasher-hillmaster-gtx-review/

    I find these a great, comfortable boots that you will walk for even in...only problem with them is they are not that high so can't cross deep water....but they were nevber designed for that.

    There are quite a few outdoor / hiking shops in Dublin city centre around Henry Street...they should stock s few brands of boots. Also one in Dundrum SC.


  • Registered Users Posts: 991 ✭✭✭ Gorgeousgeorge


    I have harkila pro hunters that are very good. Also have jack pyke hunters which are equally as good and half the price. Both are used for hiking and the mucky clay shoots

    Sportsden in navan have a good selection but they are on the pricey side imo


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 2,759 Mod ✭✭✭✭ cookimonster


    I have had in the past similar Meindl boots as the Kansas model, I used them for military service (a hugh technological and practical advancement over the then current issue). They were a great boot, but for 'full on cross country use' the shortness of the boot was a draw back. Now before any one says it, any water proof boot are only as good as their relative hieght to the depth of water. . I used various boit gaiters inculding Berghaus full boot ones, but found them clumsy, sweaty and retained water if submerged.

    I went onto the Meindl Army Pro (?), a taller boot that was black in colour (blended in better in uniform). These were an improvement over the shorter boots with you less likely to have over spill in most boggy ground. ( The good thing about these type of boots is if they do get wet they stay warm (like a wet suit), to drain them, lay on your back feet in thr air to drain them and off ypu go.)

    When the army went over to Hiax Boots I never looked back, again these are high boots and heavy duty like both of my previous Meindls, they give great ankle support and warmth.

    A fault I find with all of the mentioned boots is thier poor grip on wet flat grass. I think the soles are hard to withstand ware and tear over general mixed ground. The same can be said on wet smooth rock, too hard to grip. This IMO is only a minor problem as they are a good all rounder and I certainly have no issues with them tramping around the Wicklow mountains over fields, metaled roads, gravel, bog, boulders, through streams, mud, bog juice, snow etc, etc.

    Having said all that, my stalking / hunting buddy has similar history and use of similar boots, but his preference is for the shorter boots, so beyound practicality, the height is a personnel preference.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,223 ✭✭✭ Chiparus


    Had the Harkila pro hunter - they fell apart after one season ( upper bit) , got Meindl Dovre about €260 delivered 12 months ago- they are excellent so far.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,007 ✭✭✭ Yousef Dirty Quagmire


    I have 25 year old meindls that are still in good condition and I wore them lots over the first few years. In recent years I never wear them because I prefer a lighter boot. Don't remember what it is, something decent. The Meindls are obviously very high quality but they're heavier and more rigid than anything you need hiking in Irish hills.


  • Advertisement
  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 2,759 Mod ✭✭✭✭ cookimonster


    I'm not really convinced on the weight of 'foot ware' as an issue. I've strived in the past to reduce weight in places (never successful in the belly area though) i.e. 1 mess tin instead of 2, a spork, hightec Gortex rain gear over issued plastics (although the plastics were the best rain barrier by far!) But never foot ware.

    I would change foot ware for work slipping out of my civi pair into either steel cap work boots, light weight Magnum style combat boots or Hiaxs. The same goes for some of my civi stuff - steel cap work boots, light weight walking boots, wellies etc, with in a few minutes you don't notice them.

    My fitness is not what it used to be but when I'm dragging or carrying a deer out off the hill the last thing I'm thinking of is how heavy my boots are. I'd go for strength, robustness and a realistic degree of waterproofing over weight anytime. I've worn the Hiax in the Pyrenees in what we would consider great summer weather and was damn glad of the heavy construction that gave great protection around the ankles and shins as we climbed up and down rocky gorges, and bluffs that had the nasty habit of either grabbing your foot as you went forward or smacking into you at ankle / shin hieght like some unseen mantrap.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,030 ✭✭✭ Boredstiff666




  • Registered Users Posts: 185 ✭✭ Damoeire33


    recently got a pair more meindl dovre and have worn them on about 8 long stalks in wet boggy ground.
    a bit tight on my first stalk but they broke in quickly and give great support.
    10/10 so far and according to reports they should last the test of time.


  • Registered Users Posts: 269 ✭✭ martco




    now they're more like what I'm after! Lowa Combat GTX. didn't know they existed.

    do you know who might carry those??

    happy to travel within Leinster

    ta


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,030 ✭✭✭ Boredstiff666


    I got them over internet. I actually had those boots repaired and there is another vid showing that, but I only got another 12 months out of them as I had totally neglected them from day one.

    My second pair I treat better and found that lots of Dubbin keeps them good and waterproof even if I have been in sheep pen and they are caked with ****e. I just put each foot in a bucket of water and they come clean. But plenty of Dubbin though and regular.

    My problem is I scuff the toes a lot when knealing down.....never learn.

    I think both pairs cost about £170.00 and the high leg gives plenty of support to ankles and tuck trouser legs in to keep them dry.

    I am still wearing second pair at moment. I think these are coming up to 2.5 years now.


  • Advertisement
  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,250 ✭✭✭ Seamai



    I've had a pair of Lowa Renegade GTX boots for the last 2 years and they're probably the most comfortable hillwalking boot I've had in the 40 years I've been trekking the Irish mountains, they might not be the sexiest looking boot but like I've already said really comfortable, fantastic support and not overly heavy. I was up the Galtys today, I didn't even feel the needs to take them off when I got back to the car, granted I wasn't driving.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,250 ✭✭✭ Seamai


    martco wrote: »
    now they're more like what I'm after! Lowa Combat GTX. didn't know they existed.

    do you know who might carry those??

    happy to travel within Leinster

    ta

    53o North stock Lowa.


  • Registered Users Posts: 191 ✭✭ Heavy handed


    On my second pair of meindls. Last pair gave me a good 11 years service which I won’t be afraid to admit I didn’t look after them very well. Got a pair of meindl dovre now and there very comfortable. Like the high boot for the extra support. Got them in Finland for €240 posted to the door.


  • Registered Users Posts: 269 ✭✭ martco


    I got them over internet. I actually had those boots repaired and there is another vid showing that, but I only got another 12 months out of them as I had totally neglected them from day one.

    My second pair I treat better and found that lots of Dubbin keeps them good and waterproof even if I have been in sheep pen and they are caked with ****e. I just put each foot in a bucket of water and they come clean. But plenty of Dubbin though and regular.

    My problem is I scuff the toes a lot when knealing down.....never learn.

    I think both pairs cost about £170.00 and the high leg gives plenty of support to ankles and tuck trouser legs in to keep them dry.

    I am still wearing second pair at moment. I think these are coming up to 2.5 years now.

    can I ask:

    - which site did you get them from?
    - would you say they fit fairly true? (as in if you're normally a 10 were they also a 10 or they a 1/2 size up)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,030 ✭✭✭ Boredstiff666


    No problem.

    I think it was these but they have gone up a bit now...........https://www.patrolstore.com/lowa-boots-combat-gtx-p-575.html

    But have a look on Amazon because shipping may be included.

    Sizes...........My proper shoe size for a 'Clarkes' type shoe is 8.5. But all my others end up at 9.5 and boots a 10. I dont know why this happens. Bear in mind thicker socks with boots.

    Would I buy them again..........Well I have tried loads of boots. I would spend 80-90 euro and be lucky if I got 6 months and end up with a smelly boot after a few weeks. I once spent about 300 euro on some Harika high leg boots I think they were. Pure junk and didnt last a year.

    These Lowa Combat GTX boots have a high leg and the leather is really thick, but they do not give you blister when breaking them in and a cheap 1.50 euro charcoal insole will stop and sweaty boot smell in summer.

    I wear them every day for farm and building and walking and everything else. But you may have to knock drivers seat back an extra notch in car because they are stiff around ankles.

    The first pair started to seperete where the band went around the leather upper as the boot leather was bone dry and never had anything applied and it started to split. This was after repair so boot was actually over 3 years old.

    I look after second pair a lot more and dubbin is great stuff for feeding leather. There are vids online where they show how they are repaired when sole worn out and it costs about £100 with shipping, but I think only one place in UK does them.

    I would never buy another make of boot again, but gettin on a bit now so perhaps just one or two pairs.

    I ended up buying them out of desperation of spending loads on junk that never lasted. To me it was money well spent. Others say similar and look after them.

    To me if they cost 250 euros and I got 3 years out of them easy before repair. If you didnt wear them every day and looked after them. I dont know how long they could last you........years and years and years?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,174 ✭✭✭ J.R.


    My second pair I treat better and found that lots of Dubbin keeps them good and waterproof even if I have been in sheep pen and they are caked with ****e. I just put each foot in a bucket of water and they come clean. But plenty of Dubbin though and regular.

    I've used Dubbin for years on leather boots and found it absolutely brilliant and cheap to buy. It renews the leather, keeps it supple and flexible, makes it waterproof and makes the boot look like new again.

    However, all the boots I have at the moment are Goretex lined so I have stopped using Dubblin. Goretex allows boots to be waterproof plus also breath and allow moistuire to escape. The reason I reluctantly stopped using Dubblin is I was afraid it would block the pores of the leather and therefore stop the goretex working. I felt there was no point paying extra for Goretex if it cannot function and work properly.

    I now use a similar product to Dubblin made by Nikewax. It also waxes the boots but is suitable to use with Goretex so allows the boots to breath after treatment. It is also reasonably priced and very easy to apply.

    https://www.ultimateoutdoors.com/mens/103149-nikwax-wax-paste-tube.html/503078/?istCompanyId=415fd961-0fbe-471a-8d25-aa4bf950e4dc&istFeedId=10340d64-a82e-4c76-96f7-8ea1b1449852&istItemId=xixwiqpxm&istBid=tztx&gclid=Cj0KCQiAxrbwBRCoARIsABEc9sgQ-QD_3MDXEqyrWUjjgaF9BzB6ZvzvCX0poL72jJZCqlU7HGF9P10aAgeqEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds

    bl_103149_a?w=801&h=801


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,030 ✭✭✭ Boredstiff666


    So how come this doesnt block the leather which by the way is dead treated skin and I doubt whether it still breaths.

    Dubbin is just animal fat and oils I think.


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 2,759 Mod ✭✭✭✭ cookimonster


    Dubbing is or was indeed a mixture of natural product's- bees wax and tallow. It sofentend the leather while adding a degree of water proofing.

    The water proofing in technical footwear is achieved by a internal layer of a breathable material such as Gortex. The membrane allows vapours through but not liquid water, so if you apply a water proof barrier such as dubbin, wax or shoe polish you eliminate or diminish the breathability of the material. The specialised boot care cream / products has the same functionality as the breathable membrane.

    When 'Gortex' boots came on issue, it was forbidden to polish or bull them with standard Kiwi boot polish in order to maintain there breathability.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,030 ✭✭✭ Boredstiff666


    Dubbing is or was indeed a mixture of natural product's- bees wax and tallow. It sofentend the leather while adding a degree of water proofing.

    The water proofing in technical footwear is achieved by a internal layer of a breathable material such as Gortex. The membrane allows vapours through but not liquid water, so if you apply a water proof barrier such as dubbin, wax or shoe polish you eliminate or diminish the breathability of the material. The specialised boot care cream / products has the same functionality as the breathable membrane.

    When 'Gortex' boots came on issue, it was forbidden to polish or bull them with standard Kiwi boot polish in order to maintain there breathability.

    I can't argue with what you say as I am not qualified but two questions/observations.

    If no waterproof seal is applied to leather then water will pass through it.

    Any moisture inside your boot can evaporate when you take them off over night if in a warm environment. Thats what we did before goretex.


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 2,759 Mod ✭✭✭✭ cookimonster


    The Gortex type materials are bonded as a lamination to the leather along with other materials that may have insulation etc (if that is a property of the boot). This allows the boot to be water proof and breathable at the same time.
    In the old days troops got trench foot from constantly having wet feet because the boots were not able to withstand the wet conditions. Change the scenario and put water proof non-breathable boots on and now your feet become water logged in your own sweat and are a breathing ground for germs.

    The new technology allows you to have water proof footwear in tradtional style boots that 'breath' while being worn, reducing sweat and bateria growth.

    A good combination for any boot is a good sock, not just padding but also for wicking and in its properties 'Not' to induce sweating as can be the case in pure nylon type materials.


  • Advertisement
  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,030 ✭✭✭ Boredstiff666


    Well I hear what you say and I thought about it for a while but will continue using Dubbin.

    I had a look in my boots and after plastering them in Dubbin at least once a month for 2 years, I can find not wet spots or places of badness.


  • Registered Users Posts: 550 ✭✭✭ steyrman


    Hi I’m running haix boots for 3 seasons for 80 pounds it’s money well spent I stalk/guide 3/5 days a week during the stags season I have the same pair for 3 seasons I have a brand new pair here waiting to be used dry feet everyday comfy on the feet no smelly feet when removed I had Mendel for years can’t see my self changing in the near future


  • Registered Users Posts: 429 ✭✭ badaj0z


    The British army ran a series of boot trials in the last few years. They tested Haix, Meindl, YDS, Aku, Altberg and Karrimor(made by Iturri). Most of the boots bought for the trials were hardly used, some not at all. Most of them ended up on the surplus market for very little money. I have bought some of these and I prefer the Karrimor ones. In summary, they are superb value for money. Look at the following ebay link. You will be pleasantly surprised at what you can get for such low cost.

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/b/British-Army-Boots/104027/bn_55195387


  • Registered Users Posts: 111 ✭✭ Croohur1


    badaj0z wrote: »
    The British army ran a series of boot trials in the last few years. They tested Haix, Meindl, YDS, Aku, Altberg and Karrimor(made by Iturri). Most of the boots bought for the trials were hardly used, some not at all. Most of them ended up on the surplus market for very little money. I have bought some of these and I prefer the Karrimor ones. In summary, they are superb value for money. Look at the following ebay link. You will be pleasantly surprised at what you can get for such low cost.

    I bought some YDS Kestrel boots on ebray, just for rough shooting on a farm, bought them about 6 months ago - very comfortable. Not really for walking through streams or wet heavy cover, but a nice light option for most environments


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,069 ✭✭✭ ronn


    Anyone using the Bestard boots, I’ve heard nothing but good reports about them, a handmade Spanish boot, ballistic shop in Wicklow/Wexford are the only stockists, afaik,


  • Registered Users Posts: 152 ✭✭ DogfoxCork


    have a pair of meindl dovre extreme and i'd sleep in them, everything you want in a boot to walk up and down rough ground with all day, stiff but very comfy and they are yet to let in any water. just clean them after use so they arent caked in ****e and rewax with the proper wax treatment before the leather starts to look dried out, meindl or scarpa have good versions.


  • Registered Users Posts: 191 ✭✭ Heavy handed


    ronn wrote: »
    Anyone using the Bestard boots, I’ve heard nothing but good reports about them, a handmade Spanish boot, ballistic shop in Wicklow/Wexford are the only stockists, afaik,

    Heard there a good boot but the after sales service from that shop for the boots is apparently shockingly bad.


Advertisement