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Gait analysis

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  • 17-12-2019 7:58pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 2,842 ✭✭✭


    Hi all,

    Going to start back running. Got up to regular 10k running and a few 20k's about 7 years ago. I had a gait analysis done back then and ended up in Asics gel-1150's.

    Want to get a gait done again so looking for recommendations in the swords area but willing to travel anywhere in Dublin area if there's somewhere really well recommend.

    My local lifestyle has a gait set up but not sure if the staff there would be trained well enough?

    Also have a voucher for Arnotts, is there anywhere in there that's recommended?

    Thanks in advance.


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 10,455 ✭✭✭✭Murph_D


    I wouldn’t get hung up on it. Evidence suggests the best shoe is the one that ‘feels’ most comfortable. There is little or no evidence that gait analysis is necessary or desirable. Eg. https://runnersconnect.net/running-gait-analysis-footwear/


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,842 ✭✭✭sparrowcar


    Murph_D wrote: »
    I wouldn’t get hung up on it. Evidence suggests the best shoe is the one that ‘feels’ most comfortable. There is little or no evidence that gait analysis is necessary or desirable. Eg. https://runnersconnect.net/running-gait-analysis-footwear/

    Will have a read, thanks


  • Registered Users Posts: 33,601 ✭✭✭✭NIMAN


    Murph_D wrote: »
    I wouldn’t get hung up on it. Evidence suggests the best shoe is the one that ‘feels’ most comfortable. There is little or no evidence that gait analysis is necessary or desirable. Eg. https://runnersconnect.net/running-gait-analysis-footwear/

    I used to suffer from terrible Achilles tendonitis. Could hardly touch them.

    Got a pair of orthotics made to measure.

    Inside a week or so, it was gone.

    Sometimes now when I don't bother putting them in my shoes or trainers as I change them about, I can feel the pain creeping back.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,572 ✭✭✭Ceepo


    NIMAN wrote: »
    I used to suffer from terrible Achilles tendonitis. Could hardly touch them.

    Got a pair of orthotics made to measure.

    Inside a week or so, it was gone.

    Sometimes now when I don't bother putting them in my shoes or trainers as I change them about, I can feel the pain creeping back.

    Orthotics can work for some people depending on the said complaint, good that the worked for you,
    they can in a lot of cases shift the "pressure" from one site to another, and this can take time to present itself.


  • Registered Users Posts: 327 ✭✭horsebox1977


    If your serious about getting your issues resolved then get orthotics.

    They are more expensive, but should fix your issues in the long run.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 7,814 ✭✭✭Tigerandahalf


    Look at an old pair of shoes of yours. Look at the sole of the shoe to see where it is worn.

    Some people wear out the outside of the heal of the shoe (underpronators or supinators). If like this look for a shoe with 'cushioning'.

    Other people wear out the sole on the inside of the heal, overpronators. For this type you need a shoe with 'stability'.

    Others dont wear out the heal - neutral runners. It can really vary for people.

    I was getting pain on the outside of my knee a year or so back. Runner's knee or itb syndrome it is sometimes called. It turned out that I was wearing the wrong type of runner.

    Instead of getting support at the outside of my shoe I was being pushed out to its side, overstretching the muscles and fibres down the outside of my leg. Once I changed to the right runner I was fine.

    I can never wear a flat shoe (zero drop type) as I start to get issues with my heal even when walking. I presume I must have high enough arches.

    If you are buying a runner check the reviews online. You will often get a good detailed review on a shoe.

    The above is just my experience. Others on here may be more in the know.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,842 ✭✭✭sparrowcar


    If your serious about getting your issues resolved then get orthotics.

    They are more expensive, but should fix your issues in the long run.

    I never said i had any issues?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,572 ✭✭✭Ceepo


    If your serious about getting your issues resolved then get orthotics.

    They are more expensive, but should fix your issues in the long run.

    The OP never said they had "issue's".
    Why do you think that orthotics will "fix issues"


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,842 ✭✭✭sparrowcar


    Look at an old pair of shoes of yours. Look at the sole of the shoe to see where it is worn.

    Some people wear out the outside of the heal of the shoe (underpronators or supinators). If like this look for a shoe with 'cushioning'.

    Other people wear out the sole on the inside of the heal, overpronators. For this type you need a shoe with 'stability'.

    Others dont wear out the heal - neutral runners. It can really vary for people.

    I was getting pain on the outside of my knee a year or so back. Runner's knee or itb syndrome it is sometimes called. It turned out that I was wearing the wrong type of runner.

    Instead of getting support at the outside of my shoe I was being pushed out to its side, overstretching the muscles and fibres down the outside of my leg. Once I changed to the right runner I was fine.

    I can never wear a flat shoe (zero drop type) as I start to get issues with my heal even when walking. I presume I must have high enough arches.

    If you are buying a runner check the reviews online. You will often get a good detailed review on a shoe.

    The above is just my experience. Others on here may be more in the know.

    Excellent thanks.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,178 ✭✭✭MY BAD


    If your serious about getting your issues resolved then get orthotics.

    They are more expensive, but should fix your issues in the long run.
    I'd say if anyone has issues then work on your form with drills and strength work. There aren't any quick fixes. I think if you find something comfortable with a drop that suits, that's more important.

    Look at an old pair of shoes of yours. Look at the sole of the shoe to see where it is worn.

    Some people wear out the outside of the heal of the shoe (underpronators or supinators). If like this look for a shoe with 'cushioning'.

    Other people wear out the sole on the inside of the heal, overpronators. For this type you need a shoe with 'stability'.

    Others dont wear out the heal - neutral runners. It can really vary for people.

    I was getting pain on the outside of my knee a year or so back. Runner's knee or itb syndrome it is sometimes called. It turned out that I was wearing the wrong type of runner.

    Instead of getting support at the outside of my shoe I was being pushed out to its side, overstretching the muscles and fibres down the outside of my leg. Once I changed to the right runner I was fine.

    I can never wear a flat shoe (zero drop type) as I start to get issues with my heal even when walking. I presume I must have high enough arches.

    If you are buying a runner check the reviews online. You will often get a good detailed review on a shoe.

    The above is just my experience. Others on here may be more in the know.
    ITBS is a overuse injury, very unlikely the shoes caused it. But complementing your running with strength work would probably have prevented it. Just my opinion too


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  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 6,648 Mod ✭✭✭✭pinkypinky


    I went to the Run Hub about 6 months after I took up running, wearing decent but not specifically running Nikes. I'd had an occasional knee pain. After the gait analysis, I came away with a pair of runners from Brooks. Never had any knee pain again.

    Genealogy Forum Mod



  • Registered Users Posts: 685 ✭✭✭davegilly


    pinkypinky wrote: »
    I went to the Run Hub about 6 months after I took up running, wearing decent but not specifically running Nikes. I'd had an occasional knee pain. After the gait analysis, I came away with a pair of runners from Brooks. Never had any knee pain again.

    Is there a charge for thr gait analysis at the runhub? Or is it built into the price of the shoes you end up buying?


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,825 ✭✭✭IvoryTower


    davegilly wrote: »
    Is there a charge for thr gait analysis at the runhub? Or is it built into the price of the shoes you end up buying?

    its free


  • Registered Users Posts: 190 ✭✭Gerlad


    davegilly wrote: »
    Is there a charge for thr gait analysis at the runhub? Or is it built into the price of the shoes you end up buying?

    It's €25 but they take it off the price off your shoes if you buy a pair.


  • Registered Users Posts: 159 ✭✭dickidy


    amphibian king at base2 race do them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,455 ✭✭✭✭Murph_D


    Gerlad wrote: »
    It's €25 but they take it off the price off your shoes if you buy a pair.

    Who told you that?

    Gait analysis is snake oil, don’t bother with it. Plenty of opinion available in this forum if you care to search.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,825 ✭✭✭IvoryTower


    Sorry it was free a few years ago didn't realise they started charging


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