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Brexit for classic cars?

  • 13-12-2019 6:58pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 6,030 ✭✭✭ lomb


    What does Brexit mean for classics. Assuming Britain leave the EU at end of Jan and there is a 2-3 year transition I presume no VAT is payable on import for this time? The NOX emission is capped at 600 on petrols and presumably nothing on 30y old classics?
    And the vrt exemption carries on?


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 2,827 ✭✭✭ User1998


    Not the answer you want to hear but absolutely no one knows the answer and any reply you get will be speculation guess work or talking sh*t. Regards the €600 cap yes this is true but not many petrol cars will reach the €600 cap


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,796 ✭✭✭ Isambard


    it depends what agreement is reached. We'll have to wait and see and suck it up


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,188 ✭✭✭ JabbaTheHut


    Am I right in saying that after Janurary 1st, importing a 30 yr old car, and older, the NOX emissions rules do not apply? As in, for classic and vintage cars, the rules as it stands right now, will still apply?


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,447 ✭✭✭ ba_barabus


    LIGHTNING wrote: »
    I assume it will be the same as buying from the US (ie hit with loads of random taxes)

    Not just yet though. On the 31st of Jan thereafter everything will continue as normal until the end of the transition period whenever that ends up being


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,953 aujopimur


    Imports from non EU countries are 10% duty and 23% VAT on everything incl delivery etc..


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  • Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators Posts: 2,941 Mod ✭✭✭✭ macplaxton


    Am I right in saying that after Janurary 1st, importing a 30 yr old car, and older, the NOX emissions rules do not apply?

    Correct.


  • Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators Posts: 2,941 Mod ✭✭✭✭ macplaxton


    lomb wrote: »
    The NOX emission is capped at 600 on petrols and presumably nothing on 30y old classics?
    And the vrt exemption carries on?

    No NOX VRT charge as >30yo falls into VRT Category C.

    Under 30yo is generally VRT Category A (private passenger cars up to 8 passenger seats - ECWVTA classification M1) so is subject to the NoX VRT charge as well as the existing CO2 VRT charge)

    Lots of vehicles in the 20-30yo range will get hit with the max NoX charge as NoX wasn't recorded separately until EURO 3 emission standards came in (150mg) and the €600 cap buys 80mg. So unless it's less than 80mg and you have the CoC or other Revenue accepted evidence, they'll just charge the max. So unless you've got the paperwork to prove, be prepared for a €1320 minimum VRT bill.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,796 ✭✭✭ Isambard


    ba_barabus wrote: »
    Not just yet though. On the 31st of Jan thereafter everything will continue as normal until the end of the transition period whenever that ends up being

    Revenue seem to be saying end of March deadline with proof the car was in the state end of February, (and different should it go "no deal"


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,937 ✭✭✭ KevRossi


    I don't think they can charge VAT on imported cars if the VAT has already been paid in the EU. I know of one car that was moved from Germany to Australia around 2005 when a German moving there took the car with them. The car changed owners there and came back to the UK in 2017, no VAT was charged on it as VAT had already been paid `when it was purchased new. It was a Lancia Delta Integrale, no idea of the year.

    So once a car was registered in the UK before 31 Jan 2020, or whatever the cut off date will be, then it should be VAT exempt here, anything afterwards will have to have VAT applied. This will make UK imports more expensive at some time in the future.

    The government could of course change VRT over to VAT, but you can bet that the SIMI will stick their oar in to make imported cars less attractive in some wat to ensure their members sell more.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,796 ✭✭✭ Isambard


    KevRossi wrote: »
    I don't think they can charge VAT on imported cars if the VAT has already been paid in the EU. I know of one car that was moved from Germany to Australia around 2005 when a German moving there took the car with them. The car changed owners there and came back to the UK in 2017, no VAT was charged on it as VAT had already been paid `when it was purchased new. It was a Lancia Delta Integrale, no idea of the year.

    So once a car was registered in the UK before 31 Jan 2020, or whatever the cut off date will be, then it should be VAT exempt here, anything afterwards will have to have VAT applied. This will make UK imports more expensive at some time in the future.

    The government could of course change VRT over to VAT, but you can bet that the SIMI will stick their oar in to make imported cars less attractive in some wat to ensure their members sell more.
    Yes but in that case both Germany and the UK were in the EU. Once the UK are out, then they will be charging duty and VAT. It's on their website.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,093 ✭✭✭ hi5


    VAT will be applicable on almost everything from the UK unless deals are struck.

    Poland as an example joined the EU in 2004 but I can import a 2000 car from there and not pay VAT even though EU VAT was never paid.
    That's the opposite I know but the point is the rules apply from the join/leave date.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,529 ✭✭✭ kyote00


    So will the extra VRT/VAT on imported classics mean that cars already in the country rise in value ? Supply is hindered ?


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,796 ✭✭✭ Isambard


    kyote00 wrote: »
    So will the extra VRT/VAT on imported classics mean that cars already in the country rise in value ? Supply is hindered ?

    yes I'd imagine so.
    VAT+duty+VRT would make non EU (ie UK) cars uncompetitive.


  • Registered Users Posts: 107 ✭✭ _ptashek_


    kyote00 wrote: »
    So will the extra VRT/VAT on imported classics mean that cars already in the country rise in value ? Supply is hindered ?

    Most likely. The problem is, asking prices for classics here are already in dreamer territory, have been for years.

    But it'll affect the modern used car market far worse. The best option would be to switch to LHD traffic over the next few years, and open up the flood gates to the continental market.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,488 ✭✭✭ CelticRambler


    lomb wrote: »
    Assuming Britain leave the EU at end of Jan and there is a 2-3 year transition ...

    Whatever about the VAT, you need to update your assumption: the "2-3 year transition period" has been running since Theresa May first signed up to it. Come 31st January 2020, there'll only be 11 months of it left. Unless Johnson decides to bring in new legislation to overturn the legislation he pushed through this week to prevent that period being extended.


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 25,535 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Dades


    _ptashek_ wrote: »
    The best option would be to switch to LHD traffic over the next few years, and open up the flood gates to the continental market.
    Ha, yeah! People find it hard enough to drive on the side of the road they supposedly learned on.

    The auto industry here is LOVING brexit. No more value to be found across the Irish sea. Between them and government they have no interest in value for the motorist.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 643 ✭✭✭ duskyjoe


    Isambard wrote: »
    yes I'd imagine so.
    VAT+duty+VRT would make non EU (ie UK) cars uncompetitive.

    This is what the car industry and govt want


This discussion has been closed.
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