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Maintenance charger over the winter

  • 24-11-2019 6:30pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 942 ✭✭✭ outfox


    Hi all
    Despite all the advice plastered all over the web about connecting the negative clip to the body frame rather than the negative terminal of the battery, I went ahead and connected it to the battery directly. This is because the charger manual recommended this, surprisingly. The expert in my local battery dealer also said it would be fine to connect to the battery directly.

    Does any one else connect directly to the battery? To complicate things, the battery is in the boot of the car, and I can't leave the boot lid open in its current garage.

    The car is off the road for the winter, and I'm starting to think there's going to be one hell of a bang.


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 17,957 ✭✭✭✭ Del2005


    Why not just remove the battery and charge it indoors. FWIW I've a trickle charger hard wired to my bikes battery, that's how the instructions said to do it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,156 ✭✭✭ w124man


    This is a serious post, yeah?


  • Registered Users Posts: 942 ✭✭✭ outfox


    Unfortunately, yes. My garage is unavailable at the moment, and I've temporary storage arranged. I don't know how secure it is, so don't want to leave the boot lid open in case the battery is whipped.
    I'd also prefer not to remove the battery, as the electronics could go haywire. Battery removal was the simplest option on the older Mercs that I had, but I'd be worried that the car might be plagued by electronic gremlins if the battery was removed for a few months. I'm also convinced that cars deteriorate a lot faster when the battery is removed, although maybe this is my imagination.
    I'm not sure what the best way around this is. The storage is not readily accessible, so calling in and out at intervals to connect a charger is not an option.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,156 ✭✭✭ w124man


    My R129 has a CTEK battery charger attached to it with just the mains lead hanging out of the boot and the boot locked. Whoever told you about connecting the negative clip to the body frame rather than the negative terminal of the battery is yanking your chain. Of course the charger manual recommended it, unsurprisingly.


  • Registered Users Posts: 942 ✭✭✭ outfox


    OK, that's a relief, thanks. When opening your boot after a spell, did you ever get a whiff of any gas from the battery?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,156 ✭✭✭ w124man


    outfox wrote: »
    OK, that's a relief, thanks. When opening your boot after a spell, did you ever get a whiff of any gas from the battery?

    Nope!


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,683 ✭✭✭ SCOOP 64


    ive always connected the nagative clip to battery terminal when jump starting never had any problems, maybe just been lucky over the years.


  • Registered Users Posts: 942 ✭✭✭ outfox


    I used to do that too, but got the impression from reading online that direct connection to the negative terminal is a no no when jump starting. I think it's less of an issue during maintenance charging as there is less off-gassing. But everyone I know connects directly to the negative terminal.


  • Registered Users Posts: 663 ✭✭✭ Tazio


    My classic car has a battery cut off switch so the battery stays in the car (in the boot). I use a battery (trickle) conditioner and connect directly to the battery terminals. The conditioner / charger will attempt to bring the battery voltage up to it's predetermined value - if you connect -ve to chassis etc you're adding in this loss .. well in my mind anyway.

    Cheers
    T


  • Registered Users Posts: 942 ✭✭✭ outfox


    Tazio wrote: »
    if you connect -ve to chassis etc you're adding in this loss .. well in my mind anyway.
    T

    That makes sense actually.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,156 ✭✭✭ w124man


    outfox wrote: »

    but got the impression from reading online that direct connection to the negative terminal is a no no when jump starting.

    Im curious to know where you are getting this from


  • Registered Users Posts: 11 Draig


    w124man wrote: »
    Im curious to know where you are getting this from

    I always thought it was to prevent sparks around the battery in case there were fumes there.


  • Registered Users Posts: 21,259 ✭✭✭✭ Esel


    Draig wrote: »
    I always thought it was to prevent sparks around the battery in case there were fumes there.
    Yeah, it's recommended for that reason.

    Not your ornery onager



  • Registered Users Posts: 942 ✭✭✭ outfox


    w124man wrote: »
    Im curious to know where you are getting this from

    A lot of online articles state it. eg.

    https://www.halfords.ie/advice/motoring/how-to-guides/how-to-jump-start-a-car-guide-video


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,156 ✭✭✭ w124man


    Draig wrote: »
    I always thought it was to prevent sparks around the battery in case there were fumes there.

    Why on earth would you connect a live battery charger to a battery? Connect first and then switch on, its basic stuff! There are obviously better idiots out there these days which must why there are instructions on shampoo bottles!


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 25,535 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Dades


    Obviously I'm going to have to rethink the way I connect my battery charger when I pull the battery.

    And the way I shampoo my hair.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11 Draig


    w124man wrote: »
    Why on earth would you connect a live battery charger to a battery? Connect first and then switch on, its basic stuff! There are obviously better idiots out there these days which must why there are instructions on shampoo bottles!

    Obviously.but the question I was answering was about when jump starting.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,077 ✭✭✭ Tails142


    The reason has been mentioned in a couple of other posts, positive red terminal gets connected first then the black negative. When connecting the negative there can tend to be a spark especially if there is an active draw, charging batteries emit hydrogen which is extremely flammable, think of the Hindenburg. The advice is to connect the negative to the chassis, reducing the chance of a spark near to the battery which could cause it to explode. Batteries exploding into people's faces is the main risk when jump starting cars.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,156 ✭✭✭ w124man


    Tails142 wrote: »

    charging batteries emit hydrogen which is extremely flammable, Batteries exploding into people's faces is the main risk when jump starting cars.

    Jumping cars is not the same as charging. Sealed batteries tend not to emit hydrogen dont you think? Ive been jumping cars for well over 50 years and never heard of one exploding!


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