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Joining a running club?

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  • 21-11-2019 9:38pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 2,054 ✭✭✭


    I was a late starter to running..only took it up in my 40s..
    Now in my 50s I continue to run a lot...on my own.
    Debating would a running club be of help to me?
    I still wanna get faster/ stronger etc..first half coming up soon.
    Advantages of a club?


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 1,231 ✭✭✭Wottle


    Zipppy wrote: »
    I was a late starter to running..only took it up in my 40s..
    Now in my 50s I continue to run a lot...on my own.
    Debating would a running club be of help to me?
    I still wanna get faster/ stronger etc..first half coming up soon.
    Advantages of a club?

    Training partners, cameraderie, guidance from a coach.
    Well worth a punt.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 80 ✭✭Simmer down


    I got back into running last year, joined a club this year. Best thing I've done to keep me motivated and feeling like I'm part of something. Go out running on training nights when I want, as well as doing my own thing. Meeting new people, having the odd chat to see what other people are aiming towards. It's all good.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,895 ✭✭✭Sacksian


    There's really no downside - go along to a couple of sessions or long runs and see how you get on.

    Also, in your 50s, you're in the mix for o50 team competitions, xc teams, etc.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,166 ✭✭✭ooter


    wouldn't put anyone off joining a club but just thought i'd put forward the idea of going with a coach. I've never been a member of a club (the training times just don't suit me) and I have no problem training on my own. I went with a coach 4 months ago and I can really see the improvements in my running. it's obviously more expensive than club membership but worth it in my opinion


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,250 ✭✭✭coogy


    Like ooter, I've never been a member of a running club and have trained on my own for the last 2 and a half years, ever since I started taking running seriously. Never had a problem with this but a lot of fellow runners assured me of the benefits of joining a club (as mentioned above).
    I started using a coach for the first time about three weeks ago and it's working out really well for me. However, I still plan on joining a running club in the new year.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,054 ✭✭✭Zipppy


    OP here.. I ran the Clontarf Half last weekend..must say it was great mixing with lots of other like minded folk..I even lots of advice in cafe pre race from people I just sat beside.
    I am thinking of going back to doing some park runs and maybe head out with Dublin Runners..I feel that such involvement, even of coffee and cake, will bring be on a lot.

    On a side note.. twas my first half..I am hooked..planning a few next year :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,080 ✭✭✭BeepBeep67


    I've always been a club member through my various running lives.
    I rarely training with the club these days as my training does not always fit.
    I do however try and make it to the midweek sessions several times per year and put on a series of summer time trials.
    There is a main WhatsApp group and various spin offs that are more relevant to my training, Sunday long run meet ups etc.

    I think potential club members get fixated with the team perception, it's not GAA or Soccer where you need to train Tuesday and Thursday or you don't make the team. Running is generally an individual sport, but when the opportunity comes along to represent your club either as an individual or part of a team it makes it all the more worthwhile.

    Most clubs with facilitate an introdutory period where you can just turn up for a handful of sessions and see if it works for you, again usually with no committment to attend x number of sessions.


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