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How I got over Plantar Fasciitis

  • 06-11-2019 10:09pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 8,268 ✭✭✭


    I was asked in another thread about how I dealt with my plantar fasciitis and I though it would be better to answer it here.

    https://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showpost.php?p=111637162&postcount=3
    Sorry to interrupt your thread but I'm curious to know exactly how you solved your plantar fasciitis problem. I'd have thought shoes without arch support would give you fasciitis! I can walk in trainers but ordinary flat shoes are painful for me. Do you do stretching exercises?

    Background: So I first developed PF about 3 years ago. I had to give up running completely and wore prescribed orthopaedic insoles. The pain went away but any attempt to go back running even with insoles brought back the pain within a week. I wasn't given any advice on footwear or exercises. This year it returned again from just walking, even worse than before.

    As luck would have it I was bargain hunting in a charity shop and I picked up a pair of as new Nike trainers RRP 100+ for a tenner. They looked like fashion trainers to me, but crucially they are completely flat on the inside and on the bottom. I've always worn running trainers casually since my 20's and never wore this completely flat style before. My feet felt better in them instantly. I didn't think they were suitable for running as they are a bit bulky so I bought a pair of canvas shoes, we used to call them sandshoes when we were kids. A fiver in Dunnes so bought 1 for running and 2 for walking. Again they are completly flat on the inside and on the bottom, no support whatsoever. This style of thing: https://www.dhresource.com/0x0/f2/albu/g2/M00/48/D3/rBVaG1V_xtmAaOR3AALyQcfGfp0473.jpg. The ones I use for running are 1/2 size too big for me, giving the foot room to expand on impact. I found that more comfortable than using my right size when running.

    Three months later I'm back running every other day and although the PF is not completely gone it is vastly improved and I can run without it getting any worse and walking normally which is quite the result. A month into the return to running I incorporated an exercise. I stand on a foam roller (cuz I had one handy) and grab onto a pull-up bar overhead while I role it back and forth either one foot at a time or both. Was very sensitive at first but got better over time. I stretch my calves while I'm at it.

    So changing to flat style supportive footwear made all the difference and the exercise helped further. I do not wear the orthopaedic insoles anymore and have throw them out. I'm delighted about this as I found them so inconvenient. I wear flat style footwear most of the time and will only wear supportive footwear for only short periods of time like on a night out or something, just not wearing them all day is the point.

    The above is not to be taken as medial advice, just an account of how it worked out for me. I'm convinced that in my case it was my choice in footwear that caused the problem in the first place, not my gait, my running style or anything else. Just did my first 10k in a long while this evening as it happens, feels good to be back.


Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7,108 ✭✭✭Jellybaby1


    Thank you for posting your experience. I too believe it was my choice of footwear that gave me fascia in the first place. I've been taking long walks for decades, always wore trainers or walking boots and never had a problem but on only a couple of occasions I changed my foot gear and pow! the fascia arrived in flames!! GP gave me exercises which are helping and I've thrown out the offending footwear.

    Would anyone here have any views on Sketchers shoes for just going on short walks, i.e. shopping? A lot of older people my age swear they are very comfortable.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,268 ✭✭✭AllForIt


    Jellybaby1 wrote: »
    Thank you for posting your experience. I too believe it was my choice of footwear that gave me fascia in the first place. I've been taking long walks for decades, always wore trainers or walking boots and never had a problem but on only a couple of occasions I changed my foot gear and pow! the fascia arrived in flames!! GP gave me exercises which are helping and I've thrown out the offending footwear.

    Would anyone here have any views on Sketchers shoes for just going on short walks, i.e. shopping? A lot of older people my age swear they are very comfortable.

    I think where PF is concerned one should be more concerned with the fit rather than the brand. As for fit I see that there are 4 types, completely flat, with arch support, with an elevated heal, and a combo of the previous 2.

    I find in respect my PF my feet feel best in flat style footwear. This is not to say that flat is most comfortable but comfort isn't the issue and I think looking at it that way is what caused the problem in the first place. I got used to wearing less comfy less cushioned footwear in time.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7,108 ✭✭✭Jellybaby1


    Thanks for taking the time to reply.


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