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New putter advice

  • 04-11-2019 8:52pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 1,094 ✭✭✭ Joeyjoejoe43


    Hi folks.

    Just looking for a steer.

    I've been hitting the ball great the past few weeks and rolling in some twos, as well as winning two competitions.

    I have a few quid built up in the pro shop as a result. So I'm looking to invest in a new putter.

    I currently have an Odyssey white Hot tour #2 - the one in link below.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Odyssey-White-Hot-Tour-2-34-Heel-Shafted-Putter-/142563113598

    Now I don't hate it. I actually quite like it compared to all previous putters I had (they would have been cheap so not surprising) The thing is I bought it second hand for €50 around 10 years ago and was never fitted or anything for it.

    I just fancy a change and although my putting isn't terrible it can be hit and miss at times. I would sometimes have a tendency to turn my hands a little when putting and thus changing the intended line of the putt. I actually read greens and breaks well, but my problem is actually hitting a putt on that chosen line.

    My plan is to get fitted by my club pro. He told me to try out some putters and come back to him then. So I tried a few out and my favourites were the Scotty Cameron (€399) and the Taylormade Spider (€309)

    https://www.americangolf.eu/golf-clubs/putters/titleist-scotty-cameron-squareback-putter-2018-334652.html

    https://www.americangolf.eu/golf-clubs/putters/taylormade-spider-x-chalk%2Fwhite-single-bend-putter-354044.html

    I hit around 30 putts on the putting green with both and I got a way better feel, connection and speed control with both as compared to my old putter.

    So I'm wondering have any of you on here made similar transition between an ancient putter and a new one - how did that go?

    Is it madness paying €400 for a putter?

    I'm playing off 17.8 and really want to get that number down next year. I drive well and dont mind long iron shots... my trouble is usually shots from 30/40/50/60/70 yards and inconsistency with the putter... not making enough 6 to 10 footers...When I play with single figure players, one big difference between us is how many putts they sink - especially par saves. To be honest, the rest of my game isn't a million miles away, except for the 20 - 80 yard range and maybe my course management and decision making..

    So I see putting as a great place to make up strokes and I'm willing to invest time practicing, and feel that getting fitted and hopefully getting a few pointers of the pro might set me on the right path. I just need to decide between Scotty Cameron and Spider.

    I will say that I really liked the Spider for short putts... I draw a long line on my balls ( recent development which has really helped my putting) and find it great to line up the long line on the back of the putter with this for a pure on line strike... also I like that there is less surface area on the Spider so in my opinion less likelihood of a turned clubface on impact.

    Ok so that post was way longer than I planned. Hopefully a few of you stuck with it and may have some words of wisdom.

    Thanks a mil.


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 1,829 ✭✭✭ Macker1


    Depends on your circumstances..... I could never envisage paying that much for any club let alone a putter. No doubt you will feel great initially but what happens if the putting doesn't improve after spending such a sum. You would get a great putter for a lot cheaper and then some lessons for your short game.

    To each their own as this is only my opinion.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,064 ✭✭✭ MarcusP12


    Interested in any responses to this thread also...been interested in picking up a used Scotty cameron to see how they feel so be interested to hear people's experiences of them....i currently play an odessey 2 ball which I do like but there must be a reason why the Scottys are as popular as they are....

    Op, regarding your struggles from 70 odd yards in, is this on say approach shots on par 5s? I'm quite similar to yourself and what I used to do is lay up to give a full shot in instead if there was no chance to hitting in 2 even if it meant hitting something like a 7 or 8 iron... I'd be more confident getting it on the green and even birdie territory from that range than a half shot....ive tried to work on it a bit but I think if my score mattered I'd rather the safe play until I get enough practice in...


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,064 ✭✭✭ MarcusP12


    Macker1 wrote: »
    Depends on your circumstances..... I could never envisage paying that much for any club let alone a putter. No doubt you will feel great initially but what happens if the putting doesn't improve after spending such a sum. You would get a great putter for a lot cheaper and then some lessons for your short game.

    To each their own as this is only my opinion.

    I watched a YouTube video on whether it was mad to pay the kind of money for a Scotty and your man made a good point....basically a lot of people wouldnt thknk twice about spending serious money on a driver even though you might only use it on half the holes, ie 9 times in a round....but you'll use a putter maybe 36 times but people question if it worth paying similar money as a driver.....thought it was an interesting way of looking at it....i wouldn't pay silly money myself on a new one but I'd defo consider paying 150 on a good second hand one if I thought it would make a difference in terms of feel and forgiveness and the gains in confidence that would hopefully bring....but I think whatever putter anyone goes for it has to be with a view to putting in the time on the putting green...youre not suddenly gonna be a savage putter with an expensive putter if you don't put in the practice too...


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,094 ✭✭✭ Joeyjoejoe43


    Macker1 wrote: »
    Depends on your circumstances..... I could never envisage paying that much for any club let alone a putter. No doubt you will feel great initially but what happens if the putting doesn't improve after spending such a sum. You would get a great putter for a lot cheaper and then some lessons for your short game.

    To each their own as this is only my opinion.

    Thanks for your opinion and a very valid one at that. €400 is a lot of money to spend on any club alright to be fair, and I certainly would not have entertained it a few years back, however, I have the money built up in the pro shop as a result of rolling in 2s and also winning competitions this year, and as such I will not actually have to put my hand in my pocket so to speak. I see it as a reward for the decent golf I played to win the vouchers.

    I was thinking about getting a new driver, but I am hitting my current driver (Callaway X HOT) as well as I have ever hit it. I have that club for approx 7 years now and it has served me well, but it will stay in the bag until it breaks or until I start to struggle with it.

    While putting on the other hand has cost me anywhere from 4 to 8 strokes in rounds, with 3 putts and missed short putts. I feel even the mental boost I will get from a putter I perceive as one of the best on the market will help me to improve and will hopefully get me practicing my putting more, as I look to justify the high price.

    Also, as @MarcusP12 points out, all golfers use this club more than any other in the bag, so on that basis it deserves the most respect, but you'll find that amateurs spend a lot more time and money on their driver for example.

    I have been doing quite a bit of reading about golf recently also, and I am fairly confident that the easiest way for me to shave down my handicap is to become an expert putter, so a proper fitting, a top of the range putter and a putting lesson are currently my number 1 priority and I really feel I can win a first club medal next season and have a very successful year.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,094 ✭✭✭ Joeyjoejoe43


    MarcusP12 wrote: »
    Interested in any responses to this thread also...been interested in picking up a used Scotty cameron to see how they feel so be interested to hear people's experiences of them....i currently play an odessey 2 ball which I do like but there must be a reason why the Scottys are as popular as they are....

    Op, regarding your struggles from 70 odd yards in, is this on say approach shots on par 5s? I'm quite similar to yourself and what I used to do is lay up to give a full shot in instead if there was no chance to hitting in 2 even if it meant hitting something like a 7 or 8 iron... I'd be more confident getting it on the green and even birdie territory from that range than a half shot....ive tried to work on it a bit but I think if my score mattered I'd rather the safe play until I get enough practice in...

    Yes, very similar alright and I use that same tactic on most Par 5s. Not easy get to any of par 5s in two, with the exception of one which I have had eagle putts on previously.

    So on the other 4 par 5s I tend to hit driver, then 7/8/9 iron to leave it at or close to the 110 yard marker... But sometimes best laid plans don't work out and I scuff an approach shot to a par 3 / par 4 or have to chip out of trouble on a par 5 and I'm faced with that shot distance I don't like... 20 - 80 yards

    It used to be worse and was everything from inside 100 yards where i couldn't play a full swing. I have practiced the short around the green stuff a lot and no longer dread those shots - in fact I really like them now and can get some very close... But the 30/40/50/60/70 yard shots are by far my least favorite and even worse when I have to carry a bunker or water to a tight pin.

    Even if there is nothing in my way and a straight line in from say 50 yards, I will pull anything from a pitch to 8 iron and try a nice little half swing... I find it really hard to get consistent distance and pace and even direction with that shot... I guess it is just practice and not having the fear standing over that kind of shot...

    Thanks for the feedback - glad to know I am not alone in that struggle!


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  • Registered Users Posts: 12,308 ✭✭✭✭ prawnsambo


    Hi folks.

    Just looking for a steer.

    I've been hitting the ball great the past few weeks and rolling in some twos, as well as winning two competitions.

    I have a few quid built up in the pro shop as a result. So I'm looking to invest in a new putter.

    I currently have an Odyssey white Hot tour #2 - the one in link below.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Odyssey-White-Hot-Tour-2-34-Heel-Shafted-Putter-/142563113598

    Now I don't hate it. I actually quite like it compared to all previous putters I had (they would have been cheap so not surprising) The thing is I bought it second hand for €50 around 10 years ago and was never fitted or anything for it.

    I just fancy a change and although my putting isn't terrible it can be hit and miss at times. I would sometimes have a tendency to turn my hands a little when putting and thus changing the intended line of the putt. I actually read greens and breaks well, but my problem is actually hitting a putt on that chosen line.
    It might be worth looking at getting one of those fat grips for your putter first. The idea behind them is to take your hands out of the stroke as you seem to be indicating you're doing. Another thing to look at with putters is the shaft; both length and type. The ones you seem to choose are all straight connections, no offset. Sometimes that can help with your stroke too. The offset shaft can help keep your hands ahead of the face at impact which makes for a more forgiving stroke. There's a good article here from a PGA pro on all the different variations.

    In short, there's more to putters than just the head. Grip, shaft length and hosel/connection/shaft shape are very important too.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,094 ✭✭✭ Joeyjoejoe43


    prawnsambo wrote: »
    It might be worth looking at getting one of those fat grips for your putter first. The idea behind them is to take your hands out of the stroke as you seem to be indicating you're doing. Another thing to look at with putters is the shaft; both length and type. The ones you seem to choose are all straight connections, no offset. Sometimes that can help with your stroke too. The offset shaft can help keep your hands ahead of the face at impact which makes for a more forgiving stroke. There's a good article here from a PGA pro on all the different variations.

    In short, there's more to putters than just the head. Grip, shaft length and hosel/connection/shaft shape are very important too.

    Wise words. I got a Super Stroke 3.0 put onto my putter around 4 years ago and it was a game changer. In my old golf club I used to always score in the mid to high 20s and never really improved much. When I moved to a new county and joined a new club, I started contending for competitions and started winning prizes for 2nd and 3rd and making 2s... then I won and it all started happening around the time I changed to the thick putter grip.

    For me confidence is huge and the few inches between my ears plays a significant role in how I do. So I feel having a top of the range putter and good guidance from a pro with fitting and a lesson could set me on the right path.

    Very good point about offset. I am going to read that link you sent now. I can see my existing Odyssey putter has this offset you describe, so maybe I can look at getting a Spider putter with an offset?


  • Registered Users Posts: 95 ✭✭✭ leroythelegend


    +1 for trying a fatter grip. I a superstroke 2.0 on my putter and I am way more confident with my putter. I use to have quite a narrow grip on my putter and any movement of my hands would start the putt on completely the wrong line.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,564 ✭✭✭ Russman


    Op,
    Putting is such a personal thing there's really no right or wrong answer. You have the prizes built up, so go for it and look on it as one big prize for the good play.

    That said, a new putter isn't necessarily better. You see guys on tour, like Snedeker or Stricker, with the same old putter for years/decades. Likewise you see guys with a different wand almost every other week.
    Best advice is to try as many different styles and types as possible before dropping a large wad of (admittedly not your own) cash on one. The latest and greatest might not be the best for you.
    A blade-ish style like that Cameron above is so different to a mallet style like a Spider, you definitely should try to spend some time with both. I'm actually flipping between my old trusty Odyssey #7 that's maybe 8 years old, and a Cameron, and its hard to pick a winner. I much prefer the Odyssey from short range but much prefer the Cameron for lag putting - my task for the winter is to make a decision !!


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 16,065 Mod ✭✭✭✭ slave1


    Russman wrote: »
    ... I'm actually flipping between my old trusty Odyssey #7 that's maybe 8 years old, and a Cameron, and its hard to pick a winner. I much prefer the Odyssey from short range but much prefer the Cameron for lag putting - my task for the winter is to make a decision !!

    You know you can carry two putters.....always an option


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  • Registered Users Posts: 7,929 ✭✭✭ spacecoyote


    Pretty sure that they have all the required kit (Sam lab, etc...) out in Carton House at the GUI academy. They may be focussed on Scotty putters (as they were purely a Titleist house. But have expanded their range of drivers, etc... so may have a broader putter range)

    They'd be able to get you in for a fitting session. Get you on the tech, analyse your stroke & suggest the best fit in terms of grip, shaft, head shape.

    I had a fitting of sorts years ago (was actually a putting lesson on a Sam lab) and got suggestions from the Pro. Namely that I shouldn't have that offset, plumbers neck putter. That a centre shaft, face balanced putter would likely suit my stroke.

    As other posters have said, I've also switched to a fat grip on my putter & produced some of my best putting numbers (best of 25 putts, but that's probably tied to the fact I only hit maybe 3 GIR that day. That's why a raw number of putts per round is not always meaningful). But really it's a confidence game & everyone likes something new & shiny. My office has an awards system, and I'm 1 award from having enough credit to pick up an Odyssey Stroke Lab #7 (which is very very tempting. Have hit putts with them in a number of golf shops & they are a lovely putter)

    What is your expectation in terms of 6-10ft putts. You mentioned it earlier. PGA tour average from 8ft is around 50% so you may have some unrealistic expectations around how many putts you should be making from that range


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,222 ✭✭✭ dr.kenneth noisewater


    Been thinking similar myself over the past while although looking for something cheaper. Got mine free when I bought my first set of irons a few years ago and never really liked it. Been improving this year but still struggling putting big time despite practising more. Anywhere do a good selection of decent value new and 2nd hand putters in Dublin?


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,929 ✭✭✭ spacecoyote


    Been thinking similar myself over the past while although looking for something cheaper. Got mine free when I bought my first set of irons a few years ago and never really liked it. Been improving this year but still struggling putting big time despite practising more. Anywhere do a good selection of decent value new and 2nd hand putters in Dublin?
    Worth taking a look on Adverts


  • Registered Users Posts: 227 ✭✭ rollotomasi




    Two very different putters. Different shape putters, neck design, alignment aids - all influence where you think you are aiming.

    Not cheap, but you could just get fitted at for an Edel putter where you should get a steer on what shape suits your eye/aim:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JvR_nWvhl5M

    Or pick up a few used putters that you could re-sell on, before committing to a new buy.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,533 ✭✭✭ RoadRunner


    No, get the ping fetch 2.0 you can put the whole head of the putter in the hole and pick the ball up with it. Finally useful technology!


  • Registered Users Posts: 128 ✭✭ justcallmemoses


    Yes, very similar alright and I use that same tactic on most Par 5s. Not easy get to any of par 5s in two, with the exception of one which I have had eagle putts on previously.

    So on the other 4 par 5s I tend to hit driver, then 7/8/9 iron to leave it at or close to the 110 yard marker... But sometimes best laid plans don't work out and I scuff an approach shot to a par 3 / par 4 or have to chip out of trouble on a par 5 and I'm faced with that shot distance I don't like... 20 - 80 yards

    It used to be worse and was everything from inside 100 yards where i couldn't play a full swing. I have practiced the short around the green stuff a lot and no longer dread those shots - in fact I really like them now and can get some very close... But the 30/40/50/60/70 yard shots are by far my least favorite and even worse when I have to carry a bunker or water to a tight pin.

    Even if there is nothing in my way and a straight line in from say 50 yards, I will pull anything from a pitch to 8 iron and try a nice little half swing. I find it really hard to get consistent distance and pace and even direction with that shot... I guess it is just practice and not having the fear standing over that kind of shot...

    Thanks for the feedback - glad to know I am not alone in that struggle!

    get a lesson and check your lie angles. I play my irons mizuno standard lie but have had my wedges fitted 1 degree flat and my lob wedge 2 degrees flat. It takes the 'left' shot out of play unless it's a swing fault. You'll find a lot of pros play their wedges flatter than their irons (sometimes even if they are upright in the irons)


  • Registered Users Posts: 128 ✭✭ justcallmemoses


    Definitely get fitted. I actually have a SAM putt lab fitting this evening to assess my stroke. I'm open to changing putter depending on my results.

    I think the whole fitting process for any club takes out the element of 'it's the clubs fault. I've spend €€€ buying clubs on adverts/donedeal/golfbidder but luckily that has all stopped since i got properly fitted and some lessons. It saves you money in the long term.

    The way i'd look at a putter fitting is, compared to your swing your putting stroke isn't going to change that much going forward. Therefore a 300-400 investment including a fitting will last you for as long as you like instead of buying second hand putters every season at a cheaper price


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,308 ✭✭✭✭ prawnsambo


    get a lesson and check your lie angles. I play my irons mizuno standard lie but have had my wedges fitted 1 degree flat and my lob wedge 2 degrees flat. It takes the 'left' shot out of play unless it's a swing fault. You'll find a lot of pros play their wedges flatter than their irons (sometimes even if they are upright in the irons)
    I don't think he was saying he was 'pulling' his shots. I read it as pulling different clubs from the bag to try and get consistency. Reading up his post, I thought the problem was scuffing or duffing shots. I could be wrong, just that's the way I read it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 25,518 ✭✭✭✭ GreeBo


    Buying a new putter when you are playing well and holing putts seems like a strange thing to do! :o


  • Registered Users Posts: 473 ✭✭ Young_gunner


    i'd recommend trying the EvnRoll 1.2 putter - it's top top notch

    https://evnroll.com/er1-2-blade.html


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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,564 ✭✭✭ Russman


    GreeBo wrote: »
    Buying a new putter when you are playing well and holing putts seems like a strange thing to do! :o

    There is that alright :D!!!


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,631 ✭✭✭ youcancallmeal


    I had similar dilemma a couple of months ago, just posted my follow up here.
    Long story short putter fitting was huge benefit for me and I didn't even need to buy a new putter.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,094 ✭✭✭ Joeyjoejoe43


    prawnsambo wrote: »
    I don't think he was saying he was 'pulling' his shots. I read it as pulling different clubs from the bag to try and get consistency. Reading up his post, I thought the problem was scuffing or duffing shots. I could be wrong, just that's the way I read it.

    Sorry for being vague... I was pulling them alright and some even sneaking out right too... Just not getting a nice straight flight which I get with my 60 degree around the greens..


  • Registered Users Posts: 9 ✭✭✭ stableford


    Have to upgrade the flat stick as well. Current one is a loan from a friend since I started playing more frequently 5 years ago. He is going back himself next year so I am in the market for one. Was thinking of purchasing either Taylormade Soto from TP Collection or the Odyssey Works No 7 if anyone has any thoughts on them? My putting would be very good from within 12 / 15 feet it is the longer putts I really struggle with, could leave them well short and under pressure then to get a two putt, find it very hard to judge them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,929 ✭✭✭ spacecoyote


    stableford wrote: »
    Have to upgrade the flat stick as well. Current one is a loan from a friend since I started playing more frequently 5 years ago. He is going back himself next year so I am in the market for one. Was thinking of purchasing either Taylormade Soto from TP Collection or the Odyssey Works No 7 if anyone has any thoughts on them? My putting would be very good from within 12 / 15 feet it is the longer putts I really struggle with, could leave them well short and under pressure then to get a two putt, find it very hard to judge them.
    One thing I found is helpful is to practice a lot of 3ft putts. If you're super confident over a short putt then it allows you to be more positive with the long putts, as you know you can make it past the hole & still have a good chance of holing out even if you're a bit long with your first. Plus once you start getting them to the hole itll improve the % of long putts you make


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,094 ✭✭✭ Joeyjoejoe43


    Quick update lads.

    Got fitted today by the pro. It was fantastic. He spent over an hour with me and I learned loads. The main thing I learned was that my putting stroke was not straight and my putter was not allowing my eyes to be over the ball by design...

    After trying lots of different styles, I eventually settled for the Scotty Cameron Futura 5s with 34 inch, 4 degree loft 74 degrees upright. It feels great and is lovely to the eye.

    I now have exercises to do at home and a new putting routine that I am going to incorporate into my game.

    Really looking forward to putting it into practice. My first opportunity is this Sunday's 12 hole comp, but I realise it may take a month or so for the new stroke to bed in. I'll keep ye updated.


  • Registered Users Posts: 25,518 ✭✭✭✭ GreeBo


    Sure you have to post a pic now!!


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,564 ✭✭✭ Russman


    stableford wrote: »
    Have to upgrade the flat stick as well. Current one is a loan from a friend since I started playing more frequently 5 years ago. He is going back himself next year so I am in the market for one. Was thinking of purchasing either Taylormade Soto from TP Collection or the Odyssey Works No 7 if anyone has any thoughts on them? My putting would be very good from within 12 / 15 feet it is the longer putts I really struggle with, could leave them well short and under pressure then to get a two putt, find it very hard to judge them.

    They're both very different to each other. Personally I find the Odyssey #7 really good from inside 12/15 feet but I find it hard to judge the pace on longer putts at times. The Soto would be a completely different beast IMO and from my own experience with Cameron models of a similar shape, would be very nice for lag putting. I've stuck with my Odyssey as I generally have more putts from close range than I do long ones - missing greens and pitching on usually leaves me closer than a mid iron !


  • Registered Users Posts: 128 ✭✭ justcallmemoses


    Quick update lads.

    Got fitted today by the pro. It was fantastic. He spent over an hour with me and I learned loads. The main thing I learned was that my putting stroke was not straight and my putter was not allowing my eyes to be over the ball by design...

    After trying lots of different styles, I eventually settled for the Scotty Cameron Futura 5s with 34 inch, 4 degree loft 74 degrees upright. It feels great and is lovely to the eye.

    I now have exercises to do at home and a new putting routine that I am going to incorporate into my game.

    Really looking forward to putting it into practice. My first opportunity is this Sunday's 12 hole comp, but I realise it may take a month or so for the new stroke to bed in. I'll keep ye updated.

    Was it a SAM putt lab fitting? Do you mind sharing the total price including the fit?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,817 ✭✭✭ Season 2


    Hi folks.

    Just looking for a steer.

    I've been hitting the ball great the past few weeks and rolling in some twos, as well as winning two competitions.

    I have a few quid built up in the pro shop as a result. So I'm looking to invest in a new putter.

    I currently have an Odyssey white Hot tour #2 - the one in link below.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Odyssey-White-Hot-Tour-2-34-Heel-Shafted-Putter-/142563113598

    Now I don't hate it. I actually quite like it compared to all previous putters I had (they would have been cheap so not surprising) The thing is I bought it second hand for €50 around 10 years ago and was never fitted or anything for it.

    I just fancy a change and although my putting isn't terrible it can be hit and miss at times. I would sometimes have a tendency to turn my hands a little when putting and thus changing the intended line of the putt. I actually read greens and breaks well, but my problem is actually hitting a putt on that chosen line.

    My plan is to get fitted by my club pro. He told me to try out some putters and come back to him then. So I tried a few out and my favourites were the Scotty Cameron (€399) and the Taylormade Spider (€309)

    https://www.americangolf.eu/golf-clubs/putters/titleist-scotty-cameron-squareback-putter-2018-334652.html

    https://www.americangolf.eu/golf-clubs/putters/taylormade-spider-x-chalk%2Fwhite-single-bend-putter-354044.html

    Is it madness paying €400 for a putter?
    l.

    There are all sorts of golfers out there, some will be happy playing with a set of 30 year old battered clubs others will have all the latest PXG gear. Personally I enjoy the equipment part of the game too. I enjoy trying out new stuff. I don't believe half the marketing spin out there though. I just change if I like the look and feel of a club.

    If you like the putter spend the money would be my opinion. A scotty is not necessarily going to make you putt better. But if you really like the looks, balance, feel of a putter it can have a positive effect on your putting.


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