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Ryanair - items prohibited from checked luggage

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  • 27-10-2019 3:56pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 5,827 ✭✭✭


    8.5.2 You must not have the following in your checked-in luggage.
    Money, negotiable papers (documents guaranteeing the payment of a specific amount of money) or securities
    Jewellery, precious metals or other valuables
    Keys
    Cameras
    E-cigs
    Watches
    Medicines
    Spectacles, sunglasses or contact lenses
    Cigarettes, tobacco or tobacco products
    Business documents
    Passports and other identification documents
    Personal electronic devices such as laptops, mobile phones and tablets (but see clause c below) or spare lithium batteries.

    Some of the above prohibitions seem bonkers. What gives?
    And are laptops allowed in checked luggage - Ryanair and Aer Lingus appear to give different answers. (Note, NOT asking whether it is advisable or not e.g. breakages etc, asking if ALLOWED or will this clause always apply?)


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 1,348 ✭✭✭GhostyMcGhost


    Mr.S wrote: »
    They all have logical reasons apart from maybe...keys?

    If your bag goes missing then you may have no car keys to drive home or key to your gaff


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,533 ✭✭✭Noxegon


    Mr.S wrote: »
    They all have logical reasons apart from maybe...keys?

    Genuinely curious why sunglasses are a problem, assuming they're in a rigid case. Anyone care to explain?

    I develop Superior Solitaire when I'm not procrastinating on boards.ie.



  • Registered Users Posts: 68,786 ✭✭✭✭L1011


    Minimising the amount of expensive things people can claim they crtitically needed and then rebought and recharged to Ryanair if a bag is delayed probably. Or make claims for theft by handlers


  • Registered Users Posts: 78,402 ✭✭✭✭Victor


    Money, negotiable papers - theft, other loss
    Jewellery, precious metals or other valuables - theft, damage, other loss
    Keys - theft, other loss, personal difficulty
    Cameras - theft, damage, other loss, personal difficulty
    E-cigs - theft, damage, damage to other baggage, other loss, semi-psychotic people going through withdrawal, fire
    Watches - theft, damage, other loss
    Medicines - theft, damage, damage to other baggage, other loss, personal difficulty
    Spectacles, sunglasses or contact lenses - theft, damage, other loss, personal difficulty
    Cigarettes, tobacco or tobacco products - theft, other loss, smuggling
    Business documents - theft, other loss, commercial difficulty
    Passports and other identification documents - theft, other loss, personal difficulty
    Personal electronic devices - theft, damage, other loss, personal difficulty, commercial difficulty, fire
    And are laptops allowed in checked luggage
    Depends on the airline, their baggage handler and their insurers. It will always apply for that specific airline.

    Question: If the airline says X, why would you not comply?


  • Registered Users Posts: 401 ✭✭NH2013


    Laptops not allowed as the lithium-ion batteries in them are highly dangerous if they go on fire (and go on fire very easily if damaged) and the fire from one can’t be extinguished by the aircrafts fire suppression system which is based the gas type (co2/halon) of extinguisher which smothers the fire, where as to put out a battery fire you need to submerge it in water to remove the heat, so for that reason they must be carried in the cabin.


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  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    All these prohibitions apply when checking luggage into the hold on any aircraft in the world. I remember about 9 years back going on an Irish tour to China, on which there were 3 smokers, each carrying at least one cigarette lighter. We had flown Dublin - Heathrow - Beijing, and it transpired that the lighters had passed through both Dublin and Heathrow checked luggage security. That changed when we took a domestic flight Beijing -Shanghai with Eastern China. All three smokers were called to the security desk, asked to open their checked luggage which was put in front of them, and to remove the cigarette lighters and told of the in-flight fire risk these posed.


  • Registered Users Posts: 68,786 ✭✭✭✭L1011


    All these prohibitions apply when checking luggage into the hold on any aircraft in the world. I remember about 9 years back going on an Irish tour to China, on which there were 3 smokers, each carrying at least one cigarette lighter. We had flown Dublin - Heathrow - Beijing, and it transpired that the lighters had passed through both Dublin and Heathrow checked luggage security. That changed when we took a domestic flight Beijing -Shanghai with Eastern China. All three smokers were called to the security desk, asked to open their checked luggage which was put in front of them, and to remove the cigarette lighters and told of the in-flight fire risk these posed.

    A substantial number of them are far from universal. Tobacco, jewelry etc


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,827 ✭✭✭podgeandrodge


    I should have guessed that there would be loads of answers as to why things were not advisable even though I tried in my post to avoid those answers ;).

    Victor wrote: »
    Question: If the airline says X, why would you not comply?

    Actually, since posting, I have checked a bit more and while Ryanair say "no", I checked the next clause (referenced in my original post) and it states:

    "If a personal electronic device cannot be carried in the passenger cabin (for example, because it is too large), and so has to be carried in the hold, you must make sure the device is totally switched off and effectively protected from being turned on accidentally"

    So it would not appear to be for any safety reasons if they will ignore it when you carry on your 20" laptop!
    NH2013 wrote: »
    Laptops not allowed as the lithium-ion batteries in them are highly dangerous if they go on fire (and go on fire very easily if damaged) and the fire from one can’t be extinguished by the aircrafts fire suppression system which is based the gas type (co2/halon) of extinguisher which smothers the fire, where as to put out a battery fire you need to submerge it in water to remove the heat, so for that reason they must be carried in the cabin.

    No, I don't believe that this is true. When the US authorities temporarily banned laptops from carry on, people were told they could bring them on in checked baggage only. The issue with batteries applied to ones that were not installed and over a certain power.
    All these prohibitions apply when checking luggage into the hold on any aircraft in the world.

    Incorrect. Many airlines allow laptops. Here's an example from Etihad:

    "You may carry up to 15 electronic devices (including a laptop, tablet, e-reader, mobile phone or medical device) on your flight with us, in both your cabin or checked baggage. Any device in checked baggage must be completely switched off (i.e. not in sleep or hibernation mode) and protected from damage.

    Loose or spare batteries, power banks, e-cigarettes, e-pipes and other personal vaporisers must be placed into your cabin-baggage or kept in your pocket or purse, individually protected. For safety reasons, these items are strictly not allowed in your checked baggage
    ."

    A look at Aer Lingus website suggests, while not clear, that it is also only the batteries that are an issue, there is no prohibition on laptops.

    It's all a bit unclear really!


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,924 ✭✭✭trellheim


    As NH2013 says batteries pose a severe fire risk in the hold


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,827 ✭✭✭podgeandrodge


    trellheim wrote: »
    As NH2013 says batteries pose a severe fire risk in the hold

    Aer Lingus - "Batteries can short circuit and catch fire if they are carried loose in your bag. Loose Batteries must be protected against contact with other metal items (e.g. by being in their orginal packaging or own protective case) and carried in your hand baggage.

    Equipment containing correctly installed batteries can be packed in your checked baggage."


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,707 ✭✭✭BeardySi


    The simple answer each airline and their insurers have assessed the risks (safety hazard/financial liability if lost or damaged/potential disruption to staff) of carrying those things and decided how they want to handle them.

    Barring safety concerns none is more right or wrong than others. If you want to fly on their plane you fly under their rules.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,827 ✭✭✭podgeandrodge


    Apart from Ryanair, who say no, but appear to allow laptops get checked if they are too big for carry on, I'm not sure that I've seen any airlines actually preventing laptops from checked baggage under any circumstances.

    This is despite a few people on here saying that they are never allowed as checked baggage. It would appear that this is not correct.

    It was difficult to reach the conclusion that they are seem to be generally allowed (but I'm sure there are exceptions), but obviously the general view that they aren't, for battery safety purposes, is not correct.


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 4,173 Mod ✭✭✭✭Locker10a


    Apart from Ryanair, who say no, but appear to allow laptops get checked if they are too big for carry on, I'm not sure that I've seen any airlines actually preventing laptops from checked baggage under any circumstances.

    This is despite a few people on here saying that they are never allowed as checked baggage. It would appear that this is not correct.

    It was difficult to reach the conclusion that they are seem to be generally allowed (but I'm sure there are exceptions), but obviously the general view that they aren't, for battery safety purposes, is not correct.

    Couple of times I checked in my iPad in my check in case returning from the USA, never had an issue, but on each occasion I had a note placed into my case advising my case had been opened for additional security reasons


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,078 ✭✭✭fenris


    It means that you have to carry so much that you will need to pay for cabin baggage.
    Most airline policies seem to be geared at creating an arbitrary inconvenience that can be reduced by paying more, if that policy can have a thin core of safety or security as justification then so much the better.
    You do have to wonder how we survived for so long when flying was actually convenient, pleasant and lacking in dramatic over reaction, just lucky I guess.


  • Registered Users Posts: 78,402 ✭✭✭✭Victor


    fenris wrote: »
    You do have to wonder how we survived for so long when flying was actually convenient, pleasant and lacking in dramatic over reaction, just lucky I guess.
    Actually, tens of thousands of people haven't made a proper landing.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,779 ✭✭✭Carawaystick


    Whats the deal with liquid medicines that you don't need for your flight, and can't bring in the hold? can you bring them in the cabin?

    It also seems to be an unfair contractual term according to art3.1 of the unfair terms in consumer contracts Directive (93/13/EEC)


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,363 ✭✭✭Popoutman


    Medicines are generally exempt from the liquids rule. To carry then, one would need certification from the doctor on why it's needed for the flight duration, and they may have to be new sealed containers as well. One may benefit from contacting the airline beforehand to clarify and get permission to carry the liquid medicines, and then arrival significantly earlier to the airport would be a requirement to ensure that the extra delays inherent will not result in a missed flight.

    Of course, all bets are off if one is flying through a US airport, with the TSA insecurity theater ever-present there.


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