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Beef stew- what stout?

  • 29-09-2019 3:33pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 2,326 ✭✭✭


    I am going to batch cook a beef stew after the summer off stews. Usually I use Guinness but am wondering is there a better/ tastier alternative? I don't drink stout so have no clue. Thanks!


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 3,183 ✭✭✭UnknownSpecies


    Look for Leann Follain from O'Haras or even a bottle of Guinness Foreign Extra.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,615 ✭✭✭corks finest


    Go the whole hog and lash in the Beamish


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,326 ✭✭✭Loveinapril


    Go the whole hog and lash in the Beamish

    See, I don't even know if you are joking or not! I know nothing about Stout other than Guinness appears in a lot of beef stew recipes so I did that.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,065 ✭✭✭otnomart


    Another vote for Guinness Foreign Extra !

    Although I tend to use mostly red wine when I cook beef


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,326 ✭✭✭Loveinapril


    otnomart wrote: »
    Another vote for Guinness Foreign Extra !

    Although I tend to use mostly red wine when I cook beef

    Even in a traditional beef, carrot and onion stew? What sort of red wine? I don't drink that either.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 21,412 ✭✭✭✭Alun


    Even in a traditional beef, carrot and onion stew? What sort of red wine? I don't drink that either.
    Yep, there's one burbling in the oven right now! I'll be drinking a glass or two of what went in with it too :-)


  • Registered Users Posts: 903 ✭✭✭Bassfish


    Red ales work well too. I've often used O' Haras red ale in a stew and I think it has a more pronounced taste in the final dish than Guinness or the like!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 15,116 ✭✭✭✭RasTa


    Guinness Extra stout my fav. Also, use beef cheeks


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,462 ✭✭✭Masala


    Throw up your auld recipe.... you making me hungry to try one. Been years since I made a stew!!!


  • Registered Users Posts: 32,372 ✭✭✭✭rubadub


    Look for Leann Follain from O'Haras or even a bottle of Guinness Foreign Extra.

    +1, these are both very flavoursome stouts. I rarely hear people going on about guinness being "an acquired taste" anymore, since they definitely have changed the recipe over the years to make it more mainstream & acceptable to all. People in the beer forum seemed to be in the know about it.

    Some of the own brands would have flavoursome ones too which would be a bit cheaper than the ones mentioned.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 16,725 ✭✭✭✭the beer revolu


    Dunkleweiss (eg, Erdinger dunkle) can be lovely in a stew, or a dark Belgian ale.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,596 ✭✭✭Feisar


    Try an Oatmeal stout, done it once back in the day, twas a good'n

    First they came for the socialists...



  • Registered Users Posts: 777 ✭✭✭machaseh


    I dont like it that much with guinness, it just doesn't have a very pronounced flavour in the final dish. If you do it with guinness you need to add a few oxo cubes for more flavour.

    I have my own killer traditional southern Dutch / Belgian beef stew recipe that is always a hit and is 100% VASTLY superior to any beef stew you'd ever find in Ireland. I use Westmalle Dubbel beer for this, unfortunately this is going to be very hard to find here in Ireland if you do find it it'll be a bit pricy. Buy one to drink with the meal as well, by the way. Similar style darker belgian ales work as well for this though. You might sometimes be able to find chimay or something but in general only the triples (light) and it's a bit harder to find the darker ones.

    If you do find it:

    - Use quite fatty and tough beef cuts for stewing. Cheek would be the very best but a bit expensive.
    - Cover beef lightly in flour and salt (not too much flour !!!). You can also skip that for a bit of a thinner stew.
    - Sear beef in a super hot pan until well browned and reserve
    - Fry onions, garlic, thyme, bay leaf, juniper berries, pepper corns in the fat. I dont know if you can find juniper berries here I brought it from holland. You can also put cloves and stuff ilke that it doesnt' really matter.
    - Re-add beef and put 1 bottle of the dark belgian ale. You can put some stock if you have it so the beef is just about covered.
    - Stew long and slow (think 3 hours depending on your cut). You can also do it in the pressure cooker much more quickly but then you won't have the same thickness in the final stew.
    - Some people add ontbijtkoek to stew but I dont know the english name sorry and you cant get it here anyway. You can also add a bit of mustard but don't add too much. Some people also add some white bread. Then you dont need to flour the beef.
    - Finish with nutmeg (not too much) and freshly ground black pepper and adjust seasoning
    - Fish out the juniper berries and bay leaf or warn your guests to not bite it as it's too pungent.


  • Registered Users Posts: 16,725 ✭✭✭✭the beer revolu


    machaseh wrote: »

    I have my own killer traditional southern Dutch / Belgian beef stew recipe that is always a hit and is 100% VASTLY superior to any beef stew you'd ever find in Ireland.

    You may find that with that sort of tone, people will react badly to you.

    I also like a good Flemish carbonade but your above statement is just arrogant and stupid.
    You've tasted every stew in Ireland?

    Also, beef cheeks are rather inexpensive, if sometimes difficult to source. Shin is a good substitute.

    Westmalle dubbel is not difficult to find in Ireland, in my experience and compared to any other beer of similar strength is a similar price.


  • Registered Users Posts: 27,733 ✭✭✭✭odyssey06


    Also, beef cheeks are rather inexpensive, if sometimes difficult to source. Shin is a good substitute.

    My experience in Dublin is that they were both expensive and difficult to source alas... so any pointers on where to look welcome :)

    "To follow knowledge like a sinking star..." (Tennyson's Ulysses)



  • Registered Users Posts: 16,725 ✭✭✭✭the beer revolu


    odyssey06 wrote: »
    My experience in Dublin is that they were both expensive and difficult to source alas... so any pointers on where to look welcome :)

    O'mahony's, English Market, Cork.


  • Registered Users Posts: 777 ✭✭✭machaseh


    You may find that with that sort of tone, people will react badly to you.

    I also like a good Flemish carbonade but your above statement is just arrogant and stupid.
    You've tasted every stew in Ireland?

    Also, beef cheeks are rather inexpensive, if sometimes difficult to source. Shin is a good substitute.

    Westmalle dubbel is not difficult to find in Ireland, in my experience and compared to any other beer of similar strength is a similar price.

    I've had better and worse irish stews, ranging from a very mediocre one in temple bar to a very good one on Inisheer island, but I would prefer our own recipe any day.

    Now we would usually not put the vegetables and potatoes IN the stew, but would rather boil them separately and serve on the side. I don't mind them being in the stew either though. The main thing is the lack of flavour in the Irish stew compared to our own one.

    We also have various other beef and other stew recipes all of which are much better than the Irish stew.

    Hazepeper made with wild hare (a bit expensive though)
    Hachee made with beef but a WHOLE lot of sliced onions (more of a workers dish)
    Zoervleisj which has a more sweet n sour-ish taste. It was traditionally made with horse but nowadays we would mostly use beef.
    Stewed rabbits
    Snert which is a thick green pea soup with loads of meats and sausage and vegetables in it for winter

    Etc.

    Of course I understand that Ireland being historically a super poor nation didn't have the same access to delicious spices that we had historically but it shows in the end result.


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 11,042 Mod ✭✭✭✭igCorcaigh


    [quote="machaseh;111412784"
    - Some people add ontbijtkoek to stew but I dont know the english name sorry and you cant get it here anyway. [/quote]

    Spiced bread / honey cake.

    Maybe gingerbread might substitute?

    https://thekiwicook.com/2014/12/27/ontbijtkoek-dutch-spice-bread/

    I would go with Guinness foreign export, very rich, almost espresso like. Or Nitro by left hand brewery.


  • Registered Users Posts: 16,725 ✭✭✭✭the beer revolu


    machaseh wrote: »
    I've had better and worse irish stews, ranging from a very mediocre one in temple bar to a very good one on Inisheer island, but I would prefer our own recipe any day.

    Now we would usually not put the vegetables and potatoes IN the stew, but would rather boil them separately and serve on the side. I don't mind them being in the stew either though. The main thing is the lack of flavour in the Irish stew compared to our own one.

    We also have various other beef and other stew recipes all of which are much better than the Irish stew.

    Hazepeper made with wild hare (a bit expensive though)
    Hachee made with beef but a WHOLE lot of sliced onions (more of a workers dish)
    Zoervleisj which has a more sweet n sour-ish taste. It was traditionally made with horse but nowadays we would mostly use beef.
    Stewed rabbits
    Snert which is a thick green pea soup with loads of meats and sausage and vegetables in it for winter

    Etc.

    Of course I understand that Ireland being historically a super poor nation didn't have the same access to delicious spices that we had historically but it shows in the end result.

    Just wow!

    Irish Stew is made with lamb, not beef.
    You are comparing rabbit and hare stews with beef stews? Why?
    Interestingly, I cooked a rabbit in beer and mustard only at the weekend.
    Ireland does have more than one type of stew, you know.

    The arrogant tone of your posts is extremely unpleasant. I may need to put you on the ignore list before I get myself in trouble for reacting to you.


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 11,042 Mod ✭✭✭✭igCorcaigh


    Irish/Dutch relations have just had a tumble.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,513 ✭✭✭Hoboo


    Even in a traditional beef, carrot and onion stew? What sort of red wine? I don't drink that either.

    Beef carrot and onion is the only way stew should be made, none of this barley and parsnips and ****e, so fist bump to you pal.

    I'd use whatever wine I have in the fridge left over (red of course). But if buying just to cook id recommend a Pinot Noir, brilliant for casseroles and stews. Don't need to go more than a tenner. Will make it very rich, you'll be licking the pot.


  • Registered Users Posts: 777 ✭✭✭machaseh


    igCorcaigh wrote: »
    Irish/Dutch relations have just had a tumble.

    I'm very sorry for what our kings ancestor did in northern Ireland though. I support a United Ireland.


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 11,042 Mod ✭✭✭✭igCorcaigh


    machaseh wrote: »
    I'm very sorry for what our kings ancestor did in northern Ireland though. I support a United Ireland.

    I'll forgive you on both counts :)

    Personally, I throw in a not very traditional pack of oxtail hot cup.


  • Registered Users Posts: 777 ✭✭✭machaseh


    igCorcaigh wrote: »
    I'll forgive you on both counts :)

    Personally, I through in a not very traditional pack of oxtail hot cup.

    My guilty pleasure are oxo cubes, I know it's a bit artificial but it tastes fine.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,373 ✭✭✭lee_baby_simms


    machaseh wrote: »

    I have my own killer traditional southern Dutch / Belgian beef stew recipe that is always a hit and is 100% VASTLY superior to any beef stew you'd ever find in Ireland. I use Westmalle Dubbel beer for this.

    Have you ever tried using Dutch Gold? Surely that would make the dish more authentic


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 11,042 Mod ✭✭✭✭igCorcaigh


    Have you ever tried using Dutch Gold? Surely that would make the dish more authentic

    With magic mushrooms for that added zing.


  • Registered Users Posts: 777 ✭✭✭machaseh


    Have you ever tried using Dutch Gold? Surely that would make the dish more authentic

    We don't have Dutch Gold in the Netherlands, it is in fact sold only in Ireland. I do believe it's brewed in either Holland or Belgium but that's because we have good facilities for mass-scale beer production (think also Heineken etc.).

    Same for the Hollandia lager that you find in Irish shops, don't have it in the Netherlands.

    We do have Grolsch, Bavaria and Heineken as for Dutch beers that are popular in Ireland. I have never liked Bavaria, it's ****e. Heineken is well just tasteless. Grolsch in the Netherlands used to be very good, but they recently changed the recipe and now it's ****e too.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,513 ✭✭✭Hoboo


    machaseh wrote: »
    I've had better and worse irish stews, ranging from a very mediocre one in temple bar to a very good one on Inisheer island, but I would prefer our own recipe any day.

    Now we would usually not put the vegetables and potatoes IN the stew, but would rather boil them separately and serve on the side. I don't mind them being in the stew either though. The main thing is the lack of flavour in the Irish stew compared to our own one.

    We also have various other beef and other stew recipes all of which are much better than the Irish stew.

    Hazepeper made with wild hare (a bit expensive though)
    Hachee made with beef but a WHOLE lot of sliced onions (more of a workers dish)
    Zoervleisj which has a more sweet n sour-ish taste. It was traditionally made with horse but nowadays we would mostly use beef.
    Stewed rabbits
    Snert which is a thick green pea soup with loads of meats and sausage and vegetables in it for winter

    Etc.

    Of course I understand that Ireland being historically a super poor nation didn't have the same access to delicious spices that we had historically but it shows in the end result.


    I was in Amsterdam in June for 2 weeks (I go 3 times a year), ate in a place called Moeders I think the name was a few times with Dutch colleagues. I can categorically state some of the foods you mention are pretty average, and not a patch on a proper Irish beef stew. Rabbit and hare is game so I understand why you might think a beef stew lacks flavour, they're pungent in comparison. But a well made beef stew should have your mouth watering, licking the plate and eating until you get a pain in your shoulder!

    Eating in Temple Bar and judging Irish food from that is like quoting Wikipedia in a scientific paper. Glad you got something better on the islands though.

    We tend not to use spices, only local herbs to compliment our homegrown produce with it's abundance of flavour. We don't need spices to tenderise tough meat or to cover or add flavour. It's why the average restaurants in Amsterdam use Argentinian beef and the top hotels and restaurants in Amsterdam use not only Irish beef but Irish vegetables. Irish produce is amongst the best in the world.

    I will concede I'm a massive fan of bitterballen though, unbelievably nice.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,326 ✭✭✭Loveinapril


    Hoboo wrote: »
    Beef carrot and onion is the only way stew should be made, none of this barley and parsnips and ****e, so fist bump to you pal.

    I'd use whatever wine I have in the fridge left over (red of course). But if buying just to cook id recommend a Pinot Noir, brilliant for casseroles and stews. Don't need to go more than a tenner. Will make it very rich, you'll be licking the pot.

    Thanks! I don't post around these parts much so thought my stew 'recipe' was incredibly basic.

    I ended using Guinness Extra because I left it too late to get anything else. I actually made it the evening before we intended to eat it so it was really rich. I put the leftovers in the freezer , I think I will have them with brown bread. I am definitely going to try red wine next time.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,513 ✭✭✭Hoboo


    Thanks! I don't post around these parts much so thought my stew 'recipe' was incredibly basic.

    I ended using Guinness Extra because I left it too late to get anything else. I actually made it the evening before we intended to eat it so it was really rich. I put the leftovers in the freezer , I think I will have them with brown bread. I am definitely going to try red wine next time.

    Honestly it's just an extra bit of richness, it's essentially a beef bourguignon. Great to experiment though.


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