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Silestone worktops?

  • 28-08-2019 3:49pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 5,161 ✭✭✭ masterboy123


    We are getting our new home ready.

    Builder providing the option to have silestone worktops in the kitchen at a higher cost (circa 2200 extra). But says it's more durable and fancy. As we would like to have Belfast sink, there isn't option for laminated worktop.

    Anyone have experience with silestone? Could you highlight few cons and pros please?


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 1,535 ✭✭✭ Dudda


    We are getting our new home ready.

    Builder providing the option to have silestone worktops in the kitchen at a higher cost (circa 2200 extra). But says it's more durable and fancy. As we would like to have Belfast sink, there isn't option for laminated worktop.

    Anyone have experience with silestone? Could you highlight few cons and pros please?

    Stilestone is a solid surface. They’re a lot more durable and better job than a laminate worktop with a chipboard core. An increase of 2200 extra sounds about right for an average kitchen size and they’ll last forever. If you can afford then it’s a good upgrade and I’d recommend.

    Stilestone is just one of many brands available. It might be just what your kitchen supplier do most of which is why its offered to you. Cosentino make Stilestone but they also make Dekton which is even more durable and hard wearing but more expensive again. The Dekton marble effect looks amazing.
    DuPont is another company and they make Corian which is very similar to Stilestone in durability and price. Another solid surface is Hi-Macs. The reason I’m mentioning this is Stilestone, Corian and Hi-Macs all have colours in similar price ranges. If you don’t like the Stilestone colours in your price range check out the others.
    I’d have liked Dekton but couldn’t afford it so went with Corian in my kitchen but have used all of the above in other projects I’ve worked on including receptions, kitchen worktops, bathrooms, lab desks, hospitals(easy to clean), external cladding, etc. They really are a great versatile product. The sales reps for each comes to my office every few months showing the latest colours and samples and for all their sales talk I really can’t tell a huge difference between them. They all scratch and some colours will show up marks and scratches more than others. The key I think is finding the colour, shade, texture and pattern you like.

    EDIT:
    Going with a Belfast sink I presume this isn’t the look your after but for others interested solid surfaces can be shaped to form the sink and worktop in the one product giving you a clean modern look. I'd also recommend this.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,161 ✭✭✭ masterboy123


    Thanks Dudda for an in-depth insight, much appreciated.

    What about any warranty on Silestone?

    We are going ahead with an off white shade with a grey pattern on it, to hide possible scratches. What about staining, like coffee marks? And can we place hot pots directly on it? And is it vulnerable for cracks?


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,161 ✭✭✭ masterboy123


    Edit :

    Regarding Belfast sink, do you mean we don't necessarily need to go ahead with stone worktop? Because missus wants Belfast sink and then we were told it's not possible to have that sink unless we chose silestone or granite, or any other stone. Is it true?


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,334 ✭✭✭ Thoie


    Thanks Dudda for an in-depth insight, much appreciated.

    What about any warranty on Silestone?

    We are going ahead with an off white shade with a grey pattern on it, to hide possible scratches. What about staining, like coffee marks? And can we place hot pots directly on it? And is it vulnerable for cracks?

    I have one about a year (mostly white, with flecks through it), and there's been no problem with coffee stains or anything so far - they just wipe off. I generally put hot things onto a trivet, but have once or twice put them directly on the counter without issue. One thing I have been careful about is always cutting tomatoes and carrots on a chopping board - I don't know if they'd stain it, but they stain everything else so I'm not taking the chance. For the good of my knives I generally use a chopping board rather than cutting directly on the counter top, but certainly no scratches so far.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,535 ✭✭✭ Dudda


    Thanks Dudda for an in-depth insight, much appreciated.

    What about any warranty on Silestone?

    We are going ahead with an off white shade with a grey pattern on it, to hide possible scratches. What about staining, like coffee marks? And can we place hot pots directly on it? And is it vulnerable for cracks?
    Not sure of the warranty but I reckon you'll be fine. It will last a lifetime.

    Coffee, red wine, etc aren't an issue. That part is brilliant. You can place hot pots but it's not advisable. I reckon a pot at 100-120 degrees from the hob is fine but a pot from the oven at 240 degrees could be an issue. I wouldn't recommend testing this though.
    It won't crack if put in and supported correctly. By this I mean if you've a breakfeast bar that cantilevers. If it's put in right by someone who knows what they're at your fine.
    Edit :

    Regarding Belfast sink, do you mean we don't necessarily need to go ahead with stone worktop? Because missus wants Belfast sink and then we were told it's not possible to have that sink unless we chose silestone or granite, or any other stone. Is it true?
    You could use a solid treated timber like Oak but the builder is correct in that if you want a Belfast sink you can't use laminate as water will seep into the chipboard core and it will swell and crack and fall apart.
    What I mean is the sink and worktop can be the one material with no joints if going for some solid surfaces and you don't want a belfast sink. See this image as an example
    https://icosentino.imgix.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Integrity-Q-Calacatta-Gold.jpg


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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,161 ✭✭✭ masterboy123


    Good feedbacks so far, looks like we have to increase our budget to fit in this worktop :D

    So this single unit with the sink integrated into stone looks class. Is this possible with silestone? And will it increase the cost drastically?

    Thank you all
    Dudda wrote: »
    What I mean is the sink and worktop can be the one material with no joints if going for some solid surfaces and you don't want a belfast sink. See this image as an example
    https://icosentino.imgix.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Integrity-Q-Calacatta-Gold.jpg


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,535 ✭✭✭ Dudda


    Good feedbacks so far, looks like we have to increase our budget to fit in this worktop :D

    So this single unit with the sink integrated into stone looks class. Is this possible with silestone? And will it increase the cost drastically?

    Thank you all

    That varies a lot and is something you'll have to check. As an example with Corian I think 3 or 4 standard sink colours are available like white, grey, cream and black (guess, check with suppliers) so if you've a white worktop with fleck you use the white sink. It's not a 100% match but close enough not to notice the difference and as it's a standard sink it's cheaper. If you go say green worktop and want green sink it's custom and a lot more. I think this is how it works. You'll have to check with the supplier and manufacturers. The websites will give you a good idea of what's available.


  • Registered Users Posts: 79 ✭✭ Sunny_Arms


    Hi Masterboy! I'd like to know you're initial experience with solid surface. We're planning a kitchen remodel, and we're between quartz and solid surface. I did some research, and one of my major sources is this blog from Caesarstone. The interior designer said that a particular solid surface color matches our kitchen better than the quartz equivalent. What do you think?



  • Registered Users Posts: 5,161 ✭✭✭ masterboy123


    Hi,

    We are highly satisfied with the silestone. We got D-topa for purchase and installation. We got the window sill also in the same type.

    Visitors always gave us a compliment.

    Happy to recommend.



  • Registered Users Posts: 11,933 ✭✭✭✭ Gael23




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  • Registered Users Posts: 245 ✭✭ Rustyman101


    We put one in our kitchen extension, all set up with laser, precision cut, would recommend getting upstands and sills sets it off nicely and easier to clean, 2 points we did have a bit of movement tbf they came back and levelled it, probably the extension settling, I'm talking mm here, also as previous have said would be careful with things that stain, turmic is a nightmare. Overall delighted with the finish.



  • Registered Users Posts: 414 ✭✭ ec_pc


    No harsh chemicals, we were advised to only use warm soapy water which seems to do the trick. Tea easily stains the silestone, so be careful with that. Also I think milk spilled from the kids cups can leave invisible rings which can only be seen when sun shines directly on the island unit.



  • Registered Users Posts: 5,161 ✭✭✭ masterboy123


    I have the white arabica siletone for over 2 years now.

    Extremely happy with it.

    We have spilled coffee, wines, juice, different curries with turmeric and everything in it, but no spotting and no issues. We are just using a wet sponge to keep it clean.



  • Registered Users Posts: 11,933 ✭✭✭✭ Gael23




  • Registered Users Posts: 5,161 ✭✭✭ masterboy123


    Nope, never used any detergent. But we did use multi purpose surface cleaner (Dunnes) every now and then.



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