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Under 6 hurling

  • 22-08-2019 4:53pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 6 ✭✭✭ Grace2019


    Hi I have no experience or knowledge of hurling and the rules etc so bear with me.
    My daughter took it up for the first time this year and she was put in the under 6s which is a mix of boys and girls.
    They all train together and the coaches say she is a good little hurler and better then some of the boys.
    There has been friendly matches with neighbouring clubs, but we were told by the trainers that it was only for the boys to attend these matches... Not the girls...how do they expect us to explain that to 5 year old child, sorry pet your not a boy you can't play the match but you can train with them next week??
    Is this not discrimination based on a child's sex?
    I thought this was a serious issue with GAA.
    Some of the trainers aren't that friendly so I don't want to rock the boat especially if there is a legitimate reason why the girls can't play.... But if there is no reason I'm going further ... Who do I need to speak to about it, outside the club?


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 2,359 ✭✭✭ RebelButtMunch


    Grace2019 wrote: »
    Hi I have no experience or knowledge of hurling and the rules etc so bear with me.
    My daughter took it up for the first time this year and she was put in the under 6s which is a mix of boys and girls.
    They all train together and the coaches say she is a good little hurler and better then some of the boys.
    There has been friendly matches with neighbouring clubs, but we were told by the trainers that it was only for the boys to attend these matches... Not the girls...how do they expect us to explain that to 5 year old child, sorry pet your not a boy you can't play the match but you can train with them next week??
    Is this not discrimination based on a child's sex?
    I thought this was a serious issue with GAA.
    Some of the trainers aren't that friendly so I don't want to rock the boat especially if there is a legitimate reason why the girls can't play.... But if there is no reason I'm going further ... Who do I need to speak to about it, outside the club?

    I've seen girls play at u12 level with the boys. Send a message to your club secretary. Or the county board


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,321 ✭✭✭ jprboy


    I think you need to get Paul Kimmage on the case.....

    But, seriously, I don't like the sound of this club.

    Two things:

    1. If they can train together they can play friendlies together

    2.
    Grace2019 wrote: »
    Some of the trainers aren't that friendly...
    Wow! That's completely unacceptable. I'd expect all coaches to be nice to the children and friendly and approachable to all parents\guardians.

    If at all possible try to get as many as possible of the parents of the other girls involved as well, don't do a solo run on this. Point 2 above rings some alarm bells.


  • Registered Users Posts: 220 ✭✭ Pigeon Chaser


    Absolutely no reason your daughter cannot play with the boys.

    What county are you based in?


  • Registered Users Posts: 497 ✭✭ johnb25


    jprboy wrote: »
    I think you need to get Paul Kimmage on the case.....

    But, seriously, I don't like the sound of this club.

    Two things:

    1. If they can train together they can play friendlies together

    2.
    Wow! That's completely unacceptable. I'd expect all coaches to be nice to the children and friendly and approachable to all parents\guardians.

    If at all possible try to get as many as possible of the parents of the other girls involved as well, don't do a solo run on this. Point 2 above rings some alarm bells.

    As above, ask parents of the other girls if they have the same concerns, or have approached the coaches.
    The 'coaches' are probably just other parents doing their bit to help out, and if their kids are that age they may as new to this as the kids themselves.
    A quite word is better all round. Whatever you do, don't go outside the club without speaking to people within the club first. Just ask if there are any games arranged for the girls, and see what response you get. If not, then push a bit and say your daughter wants to play, and that you understand girls can on play on boys teams up to under 12. You need to speak to one of the coaches before escalating it.


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 4,115 Mod ✭✭✭✭ bruschi


    johnb25 wrote: »
    As above, ask parents of the other girls if they have the same concerns, or have approached the coaches.
    The 'coaches' are probably just other parents doing their bit to help out, and if their kids are that age they may as new to this as the kids themselves.
    A quite word is better all round. Whatever you do, don't go outside the club without speaking to people within the club first. Just ask if there are any games arranged for the girls, and see what response you get. If not, then push a bit and say your daughter wants to play, and that you understand girls can on play on boys teams up to under 12. You need to speak to one of the coaches before escalating it.


    This 100%. You arent sure, so just ask the coaches. Sending messages to the county board solves nothing. There may be a simple explanation and an even simpler solution. Just talk to them. going outside the club causes problems when there may be no need for it at all.

    If indeed then there is a problem after spaking with the coaches, bring it to the children welfare officer in the club first. They will then advise where to go next, whether it is an internal matter within the club or you may then feel it needs escalation outside. But more often than not, it gets sorted within the club with a little bit of communication.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,815 ✭✭✭ dzer2


    Firstly congrats on bringing your child.
    As a coach of under 6s it's most important that the child enjoys the game and wants to come. There are clubs that have separate codes for the children but this really depends on numbers and the club structure. If the child is training with a mixed group then she should participate in their games. It could be that some of the games that are organised would be against clubs that have a camoige club attached and that there wouldn't be girls on their team. But this is not an excuse for your daughter not to play and the coaches should encourage her to play. It will improve her skill and toughness for when she gets to under 12 when the rules change and it becomes segregated.
    Have a word with coach you get on best with telling him that your daughter really wants to play matches as well as train.
    There is nothing like the enjoyment most parents get from watching their children playing even if they win or lose. Which shouldn't be the main objective at 6.


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,626 ✭✭✭✭ average_runner


    We don't do friendly matches for under 6 boys/girls.

    We wait for them to move into under 8's


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 304 ✭✭ Prestonites


    For a start, walk away from the club and report them. Gender doesnt differentiate in GAA until u12s

    Jesus ive seen girls run lads into the ground with a hurl in hand and goal aswell as anyone.

    Advice: Leave this club.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 304 ✭✭ Prestonites


    dzer2 wrote: »
    Firstly congrats on bringing your child.
    As a coach of under 6s it's most important that the child enjoys the game and wants to come. There are clubs that have separate codes for the children but this really depends on numbers and the club structure. If the child is training with a mixed group then she should participate in their games. It could be that some of the games that are organised would be against clubs that have a camoige club attached and that there wouldn't be girls on their team. But this is not an excuse for your daughter not to play and the coaches should encourage her to play. It will improve her skill and toughness for when she gets to under 12 when the rules change and it becomes segregated.
    Have a word with coach you get on best with telling him that your daughter really wants to play matches as well as train.
    There is nothing like the enjoyment most parents get from watching their children playing even if they win or lose. Which shouldn't be the main objective at 6.


    Some clubs still operate as mixed with a camogie section. They will mix up till 8s then allow the girls filter into Camogie. But if the daughter trains with the boys, she should be on a field with them also. There is no need to differentiate and can have a negative impact on a childs confidence and her socio complex i.e Why am i not allowed, are the boys better scenario? (THIS SHOULD BE AVOIDED AT ALL COSTS)


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,463 ✭✭✭✭ lawred2


    Sounds like a club engaging in tokenism so as to pick up some easy subs.

    I'd take her to a serious club that takes girls' sport seriously.


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