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Experience as a trainee

Comments



  • oh WOW clinical psychology training is so different to counselling in its philosophy ...

    just wow


    You mean there are people who go into this field for some reason other than their own struggles with mental health?

    SPOOF

    No way. Doesn't happen. April first.




  • You mean there are people who go into this field for some reason other than their own struggles with mental health?
    This represents an anecdotal, oversimplified stereotype that offers little. If you still feel this comment has merit, then perhaps you might consider one or more scholarly citations in support of your position?




  • LOL I really enjoyed that jarring shift in tone, great comic timing :D You seem surprised? Do you think there is something wrong with this motive for going into therapy? Can you tell me what is wrong with it? To be absolutely clear, what I meant to say was:

    "What? i didn't think it was like that, NO WAY!!! NO FFING WAY!!!!" is that more clear?

    I was just expressing surprise and disbelief! You want me to defend an opinion I don't even hold?

    Ok you want citations, I can find loads and loads of hits confirming this but of course its all qualitative, surveys, small case studies, stuff like that. And you want quantitative stuff, what can I say? It's just based on conversations with dozens of counsellors and other people who work in mental health in one way or another.. also more than conversations, the fact that this is just completely taken for granted... I mean people talk about it openly, "I want to help other people the way I was helped". Or "I want to give people the help I never got." "I don't want other people to have to learn the hard way." "I learned so much in my own struggles and I now I want to pass it on" Stuff like that. And just from various support groups over the years, everyone always wants to study psychology, everyone talks about it, reads/watches videos about it, learns about it, ends up with loads of knowledge. So if you have that history and that knowledge and you want to help people it's a very natural next step for a lot of people.

    Actually the other motive that comes to mind now that I think of it is a family member who suffers with mental illness, which is mentioned in that blog too. So again something personal and close to home, but yeah, maybe not 100%
    https://www.google.com/search?tbm=bks&q=the+wounded+healer

    Yeah just my opinion bro, who knows! It's not an opinion opinion, it's a viewpoint, like how I think electric scooters shouldn't be banned, I don't know, I didn't pretend to know :D

    Keep it real

    peace out




  • Stummbled on this out looking for something else. Feels very relevant:

    https://www.psychotherapy.net/article/quitting-psychotherapy-practice



    "Ironically, working as a therapist aggravated the very same wounds that first drew me to the field."
    From the sounds of the article this was not talked about in his training and he was offered no support in how to cope with that inevitability. I think the idea people who feel this way should quit and raise llamas is more than a bit pessimistic though

    What I am actually looking for is statistics on how many people stay in the field for more than 10 years. A few articles like this are popping up and what it seems like is the people who leave are the ones who try (or are forced) to work full time as if it were a normal job, I wonder if anyone knows any studies about this.. sorry for going completely off topic at this point!


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  • Stummbled on this out looking for something else. Feels very relevant:

    https://www.psychotherapy.net/article/quitting-psychotherapy-practice



    "Ironically, working as a therapist aggravated the very same wounds that first drew me to the field."
    From the sounds of the article this was not talked about in his training and he was offered no support in how to cope with that inevitability. I think the idea people who feel this way should quit and raise llamas is more than a bit pessimistic though

    What I am actually looking for is statistics on how many people stay in the field for more than 10 years. A few articles like this are popping up and what it seems like is the people who leave are the ones who try (or are forced) to work full time as if it were a normal job, I wonder if anyone knows any studies about this.. sorry for going completely off topic at this point!

    Have you actually LOOKED for these stats yourself?




  • As I said in the post you quoted, I hadn't finished looking for the stats but came to share something I found interesting while looking. I was not requesting help, sorry for pissing you off to the point where you felt the need to shout :D




  • https://twitter.com/KScior/status/1266661048029007872

    Will be interesting to see what this looks like.


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