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New Dad, marathon training

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  • 13-05-2019 5:56pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 162 ✭✭


    Hi guys,

    I've ran a few marathons but now I'm a recent first time Dad, so I'm looking for advice regarding training for a marathon (Dublin) that has the least impact on home.

    I can run from work at lunch Mon to Thurs for 45/50mins max. So we're talking 5/6 miles.

    At the weekend I guess there's no avoiding the long run (it'll be my only distance run over 5miles in the whole week), so do that Sun, take Sat off?

    Thanks


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Comments

  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 3,246 ✭✭✭judeboy101


    Tell the Missus you are working to try get a promotion then use that time to run. Trust me you are better staying as far away from new born til they are able to follow simple instructions .


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 873 ✭✭✭Casey78


    I've 3 kids under 7. You can fit it in if you really want to. When Marathon training I do my long runs on a Sunday morning. Sometimes out the door at 5am.
    I don't believe anyone who says they don't have the time to run or time to do a Marathon, if you really want to do it you will find the time somewhere. Of course it helps to have an understanding wife/husband but if you are willing to get up out of bed and run early in the morning or late in the evening then it's more that possible to train properly for a Marathon and still help with the kids.
    You've only one kid, sure that's no problem at all :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,210 ✭✭✭✭Hurrache


    With a new born you'll have more time to train than you will for a few years as they get older.

    Depending on how the kid is being fed you can use their feeding time to get out, or their nap times.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,181 ✭✭✭healy1835


    Have 3 kids under 7, been running for about 4 years. I would have done a lot of my Long Runs at 6am of a Sunday morning, found it tough for a bit, but got used to it pretty quickly. Is running in/out of work an option? Or lunch time runs?
    Got a running buggy for our most recent addition last year and it's been great. She took to it straight away and I'd regularly go up to 10miles with her. I've seen some on strava go longer than that too. I certainly wouldn't have been able to average 130k for my last marathon block without it!(or the upcoming one I'd imagine).


  • Registered Users Posts: 270 ✭✭Hani Kosti


    Running buggy might be a great idea however it's not recommended to run with little hoomans until around 4-6m (this is due to head control and possible head injury)
    As someone mentioned before, is run to/from work an option? Takes a bit of planning ahead but very doable.
    Runs before work or later in the evening might be the solution for you if you need to get the miles in.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 392 ✭✭Seanie_H


    I've one, 18 months old. When she came along all training went out the window. Put on a lot of weight. She slept reasonably well, a dream cold but I really struggled. Struggled with energy levels, slightly interrupted sleep, guilt for taking anytime to myself when the missus was home all day, juggling busy work life and the I'd few hours with also busy friends.

    I'm not sure the 'it's easy if you REALLY want to do it' applies to EVERYBODY in this situation. I admire it all the same. For me my want wasn't bigger than the family need. That said, a couple of my mates seriously PB'd in the year after their babies arrived and kicked on since. They thought the routine helped them.

    I'm back with some momentum again now. x2 commute runs, x2 weekend runs and another "jam it in somewhere run". My biggest thing lately is making sure I'm solely focused on fewer things. Family, friends, running (targeting weekly mileage) and less work.

    Loved Kipchoege's quote after London.
    "Asked about his next race, he said: "As usual, I do not chase two rabbits - I only chase one and that was London. I have caught that rabbit so I will discuss with my team what follows. The second option is still open."
    https://www.bbc.com/sport/athletics/48083112


  • Registered Users Posts: 162 ✭✭6run28


    Got three small ones myself. My weekend runs just got earlier to be honest. LSR on Sat at 6am back about 9. I remember doing some middle of the night runs when they were newborns but my bodyclock was all over the place


  • Registered Users Posts: 162 ✭✭TedsRevengeP


    Thanks all.

    Yeah I could do a commute run but I think the lunchtime run is the same kinda. Plus I drop to creche on way on and like to try get home before he goes down.

    The weekend LSR early is a possibility alright. What kind of prep do people do to put that kind of mileage in that early in the morning?


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,340 ✭✭✭TFBubendorfer


    Thanks all.

    Yeah I could do a commute run but I think the lunchtime run is the same kinda. Plus I drop to creche on way on and like to try get home before he goes down.

    The weekend LSR early is a possibility alright. What kind of prep do people do to put that kind of mileage in that early in the morning?

    I used to run 80-90 miles per week while having small children. It usually meant getting up at around 6 o'clock (or 5:30 for a longer run). Weekends were a little bit more relaxed but I still was out on the road by 8 o'clock.


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,704 ✭✭✭✭RayCun


    I can run from work at lunch Mon to Thurs for 45/50mins max. So we're talking 5/6 miles.

    At the weekend I guess there's no avoiding the long run (it'll be my only distance run over 5miles in the whole week), so do that Sun, take Sat off?

    One longer run midweek would make a big difference - 3 x 5/6 miles, one 10 mile, and the long run on Sunday. Where you fit that in is up to you.

    One of those shorter midweek runs should include faster running - intervals, a tempo run, etc.

    Depending on where you are in your training, I would say run on Saturday morning too, and if you can, do a faster run on Saturday, like a tempo run, so you start the Sunday run on tired legs. If you can't do that, then add marathon paced miles into your Sunday run. If you can, do both - tempo Saturday and some marathon pace on Sunday - but that depends on what you can manage.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,623 ✭✭✭dna_leri


    Make a plan for what you will stop doing - there are (only) 168 hrs in the week. e.g. less TV, social media, etc. [5% running time =8.4 hours]
    Get buy-in from your partner for your running plan - stick to it, but be flexible.
    Don't have regrets.


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,704 ✭✭✭✭RayCun


    What kind of prep do people do to put that kind of mileage in that early in the morning?

    Go to bed early enough to get enough sleep, have your running gear ready the night before.


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,851 ✭✭✭✭average_runner


    A new born is not that bad, just be sure to give the other half a break also. Early morning runs are best and then give her a break when you come back. I used to run at 6am Sunday morning and then take the baby to the zoo to give her a rest.

    Its when you have a few kids and they are into sports, then your weekends disappear quickly. We have two kids all of sat & sun morning gone with sports and Sat afternoon will disappear with sports also soon.

    Then you will have the birthday parties and just need to spend time with the kids.

    Just remember its only running, your not a professional and times don't actually matter that much. Just enjoy it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,851 ✭✭✭✭average_runner


    RayCun wrote: »
    Go to bed early enough to get enough sleep, have your running gear ready the night before.

    Not all new borns will go to sleep early or sleep through the night, not that simple, plus you don't want to be waking the other half and new born.


  • Registered Users Posts: 48 StabiloBoss


    Casey78 wrote: »
    I've 3 kids under 7. You can fit it in if you really want to. When Marathon training I do my long runs on a Sunday morning. Sometimes out the door at 5am.
    I don't believe anyone who says they don't have the time to run or time to do a Marathon, if you really want to do it you will find the time somewhere. Of course it helps to have an understanding wife/husband but if you are willing to get up out of bed and run early in the morning or late in the evening then it's more that possible to train properly for a Marathon and still help with the kids.
    You've only one kid, sure that's no problem at all :)


    Really needed to see this. Number 2 on the way this week and I've been fretting about how I'll get any running down. Of course I will, if I want to.


  • Registered Users Posts: 162 ✭✭TedsRevengeP


    healy1835 wrote: »
    Have 3 kids under 7, been running for about 4 years. I would have done a lot of my Long Runs at 6am of a Sunday morning, found it tough for a bit, but got used to it pretty quickly. Is running in/out of work an option? Or lunch time runs?
    Got a running buggy for our most recent addition last year and it's been great. She took to it straight away and I'd regularly go up to 10miles with her. I've seen some on strava go longer than that too. I certainly wouldn't have been able to average 130k for my last marathon block without it!(or the upcoming one I'd imagine).

    Running buggy was something I looked at. I'm guessing though it's only weekend runs? Evenings are out as she'd be gone down?
    Something like this where i can take the baby and give my wife a break as well as doing a run, is ideal.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,190 ✭✭✭crisco10


    Running buggy was something I looked at. I'm guessing though it's only weekend runs? Evenings are out as she'd be gone down?
    Something like this where i can take the baby and give my wife a break as well as doing a run, is ideal.

    well, it is what you want it to be. I work from home a bit, so one of my "squeeze in a few miles" type runs might be at lunchtime with the buggy. And in an ideal world, this becomes naptime too (for my OH and baby!).

    But as someone said before buggy running is only a goer from 6 months or so on.


  • Registered Users Posts: 162 ✭✭TedsRevengeP


    crisco10 wrote: »
    well, it is what you want it to be. I work from home a bit, so one of my "squeeze in a few miles" type runs might be at lunchtime with the buggy. And in an ideal world, this becomes naptime too (for my OH and baby!).

    But as someone said before buggy running is only a goer from 6 months or so on.

    Oh I should have added, he's nearly 7 months now. So he's over 6mths.


  • Registered Users Posts: 150 ✭✭Lombardo123


    Would be interested in the nutrition side of things for an early LSR on a Saturday morning if i was to do them at 6am.

    Not against it but i thought it need to be up an hour earlier stuffing a bagel into my face.

    First marathon this year, building up base mileage and i feel good. Finally committing to the four runs a week and seeing progress.

    But clueless on the race nutrition side of it.. should i be trialling stuff this early to see what works on my system? Even though the mileage may not warrant it?


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,704 ✭✭✭✭RayCun


    You don't really need to eat before a morning run.

    As your runs get longer, if you start feeling hungry, you could have something more to eat the evening before. Or, yeah, have a quick bagel, if you don't mind eating before you run.

    But we're all carrying plenty of fuel for an easy run.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 4,298 ✭✭✭ariana`


    Hi guys,

    I've ran a few marathons but now I'm a recent first time Dad, so I'm looking for advice regarding training for a marathon (Dublin) that has the least impact on home.

    I can run from work at lunch Mon to Thurs for 45/50mins max. So we're talking 5/6 miles.

    At the weekend I guess there's no avoiding the long run (it'll be my only distance run over 5miles in the whole week), so do that Sun, take Sat off?

    Thanks

    So many good points made here - invest in a running buggy, run early, run at lunch which you are already doing. .

    Personally, i think the most important thing you can do it talk through your hopes/plans with your other half and make sure you have her support and make sure her needs are included too, she will need a bit of me-time even if it's not spent running. If it's routine your partner is a lot less likely to resent it if you come in from work and announce you're heading back out for a run.

    When our kids were very small we used to take turns - i'd have 2 evenings a week, he'd have 2 evenings. I'd run early on Saturday and he'd cycle early on Sunday (we still do this)... That way i knew i was going to get certain runs in and anything else was a bonus and we still had family time. We also took turns with being on night duty (well once i finished feeding them we did :cool:).

    But every family is so different so you need to work it out together. It'll be ever changing too of course, babies needs change as they grow and Mum/Dads needs might change too as the running bug takes over :D

    Best of luck with it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,336 ✭✭✭EC1000


    RayCun wrote: »
    You don't really need to eat before a morning run.

    ...........

    But we're all carrying plenty of fuel for an easy run.

    This. I often run fasted in the morning without any problem. If you are getting in to long marathon training sessions, then perhaps add in a bagel - I've often had one going out the door - for a slow run there is no need to wait for an hour after eating.

    My eldest is 8 and I actually find that things are getting busier with age as they are now into football/hurling/swimming, etc....


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,628 ✭✭✭Enduro


    Would be interested in the nutrition side of things for an early LSR on a Saturday morning if i was to do them at 6am.

    Not against it but i thought it need to be up an hour earlier stuffing a bagel into my face.

    First marathon this year, building up base mileage and i feel good. Finally committing to the four runs a week and seeing progress.

    But clueless on the race nutrition side of it.. should i be trialling stuff this early to see what works on my system? Even though the mileage may not warrant it?

    I can't think of any Training run that you would *need* to eat for. Either its a speed session that will be too short to deplete your glycogen reserves, or a longer slower run where you should be more fat burning. I work on the opposite and try to leave as long a gap as possible between eating and training so as to enhance fat burning adaptations.


  • Registered Users Posts: 26,928 ✭✭✭✭rainbow kirby


    I have a 3 year old and a 15 month old. Ran Manchester and London in April and also ran London in April 2017 when my older boy was 13 months old. I run commute home from work 3 days a week (stretching one out to a medium long run), do parkrun with the double buggy on Saturday morning and long run with my club on Sundays. I'm slower than I used to be, baby weight lingering and not enough sleep but I need to run to keep myself sane. It's not the time in my life for PBs but I can still enjoy it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,811 ✭✭✭Tigerandahalf


    Don't be too worried about chasing pbs when the kids are very young. It is very hard to do hard training if you are only getting 4 - 6 hrs sleep a night.

    Some lads might get lucky where their wife breast feeds in a separate room but if she is bottle feeding you will be in a 3am bottle routine.

    I found running with a buggy not much fun. Nappies have to be changed. They will whinge and drop something. You would never get going.

    For me getting out for a run is a bit of head space. I find once they are in bed works well for me. I often go out between 9 and 10pm. You are sometimes wrecked but once you get out, you get the energy. It also stops you from sinking into the couch and pulling the pringles and the chocolate out.

    I enjoyed the last few years running without any pressure for races. Doing the odd parkrun. Going away for a weekend and finding a new one to do can change things up. Run a few trails and greenways. Just enjoy the simple pleasure of running.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,582 ✭✭✭Swashbuckler


    You're getting lots of different opinions but you already have the answer. You can run on your lunch break each day and you can manage a long run at the weekend. Assuming you're not completely zombified from lack of sleep you have enough in there to train. It might not be the best marathon ever.

    That being said what time are you targeting? I might have to revisit my advice of expected paces for tempo/threshold/easy are on the extreme slower end


  • Registered Users Posts: 1 everest26


    Controversial opinion alert...yes, you can fit in the training but really think about whether it's fair on your other half. Having a new born is so tough and you need to be around.
    I've seen a few fathers prioritise their hobbies while wives were struggling with small children and it doesn't do a marriage any good. You could keep up the running but a marathon is a BIG commitment. It will still be there next year.


  • Registered Users Posts: 485 ✭✭Applegirl26


    No babies in our house anymore but we have five children and I've trained for 2 marathons in the past year. Early morning runs are the only thing that works for me. Sometimes these can be ridiculously early if I am working that day and need to fit it in before work.

    I need to get up and out before my wolf pack wake up. If my youngest even sniffs that I'm awake he will be up for the day and go wake his brothers. I set out my gear the night before so it's all ready, brush my teeth and I'm gone. When I started running I did try and run at night when they had gone to bed and my husband was there to watch them, but that presented other problems such as being followed and intimidated by the many creeps out there. We were living in a different neighbourhood then so not everywhere might be like that.

    What I would suggest is sitting down with your better half and having a chat about it. Make sure she has something for herself like a yoga class or even just meeting her girlfriends on a certain evening each week.

    If it was me, I would time my run so I'd be back home in time to catch baby waking and making noise for their first feed. Let your wife sleep on, you enjoy some cuddles with baby, you have your run done. Everyone is happy.

    Best of luck with it all.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,931 ✭✭✭huskerdu


    You will have a lot to fit in each week
    - work
    - sleep
    - household chores
    - spending time with the baby
    - You and your partner having time for yourself and for your hobbies
    - spending time with your partner

    It’s possible to fit in the hobbies with some planning once you and your partner work out a plan and you are both clear on the priority your hobbies have compared to everything else on the list, because nothing on that list can be neglected.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 8,207 ✭✭✭partyguinness


    I am 40. 2 kids- nearly 3 and 7. I also run my own business so I have a lot of 12 hours days and will be involved with work 7 days a week.

    Ran my first marathon 2 years ago when youngest was 10 mts old. Have ran 3 since and hoping for 2 later this year.

    The youngest would always wake up around 4-5am for a bottle and this was very useful in getting me up for the long runs on a Sunday morning. I would start long runs at 8-8:30am so it allowed me to have breakfast at 4-5am. Now she sleeps through but I find it harder to get my self up

    My running schedule ATM is like this
    - Monday 6.30 (with a running club straight from work)- 5-6 miles woodland trails
    - Wednesday 7:30 (speedwork sessions on a track- tough but well worth it again with running club)
    - Sunday - some events just to keep me ticking over

    Now over the next few weeks I will up the game

    - Friday-
    Option A- 9:30am 5-6 trail run with club and get to work a little later (I have this luxury)
    Option B- 7:30pm- long run on my own (10-15 miles which will go up to 20miles)
    - Sunday- 8-9am- long runs again 12-13 miles or an event (HM usual)

    And then start again on Monday repeat as above. Quite lucky to have a running club close by (not an athletics club) and I get trail runs, road runs and track runs in to mix it up.

    As a new father you will find that you will not socialise as much and getting up early will not be an issue as your sleep patterns are ruined now.


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