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Marathon Statistics 2019 Worldwide

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  • 06-05-2019 9:08am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 4,981 ✭✭✭


    Thought this was interesting, we're mid-table on finish times but well up there on increasing participation.

    Changes from 2008 to 2018

    Participation growth: +49.43%
    Pace change: 3:55m slower
    The proportion of female participants: +1.4%
    Participation increase: India (+229%), Portugal (+177%) & Ireland (+130%)
    Participation decline: Slovenia (-65%), Iceland (-61%) & Turkey (-59%)
    Pace improvements: Switzerland (-14:56m), Russia (-12:49m) & Japan (-11:31m)
    Pace decline: Korea (+47:09m), China (+42:16m) & Norway (+41:07m)

    Marathon Statistics 2019 Worldwide


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 13,857 ✭✭✭✭Zebra3


    Fifth highest percentage of female participants.

    Fantastic!!!!


  • Registered Users Posts: 946 ✭✭✭KSU


    Surprised to see Ireland buck the trend of slowing marathon times.

    Wonder is the early sell out influencing this with people actually putting in longer build ups due to having to sign up early.

    Depressingly though it looks like the slower finishing times seems to have only accelerated in the last decade compared to previous (average times roughly 1hr slower than 40 years ago not including the elite males and females)


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 24,088 Mod ✭✭✭✭robinph


    The change to Sunday marathons rather than the bank holiday mondays that the UK don't get will have made a big change in the numbers for Ireland.

    But I'm dubious about the number of marathoners from just glancing at the UK total they have 97,000. Is that just each individual counted once, or total number of marathons run each year? There are 40,000+ just with London, add in a few others with 10-15K numbers such as Manchester/ Liverpool/ Brighton/ etc and there should be way more instances of marathons run than 100,000. Even allowing for people only being counted once despite multiple runs per year that number seems low when nearly 50% of them are in London.


  • Registered Users Posts: 61 ✭✭TheJak01


    KSU wrote: »
    Depressingly though it looks like the slower finishing times seems to have only accelerated in the last decade compared to previous (average times roughly 1hr slower than 40 years ago not including the elite males and females)

    This is a good thing. Faster finishing times mean more "elite" (taking a lose interpretation of elite, let's say Boston QT runners) runners. Slower finishing times just means we have more slower runners - first timers and people who do it purely for the fun of running - rather than those taking their performance more seriously.

    Marathon running - a sport that caters for everybody. Whether simply wanting to take part in the experience or wanting to break 2 hours. The sport of the masses. I'd be pretty happy to hold that title.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,584 ✭✭✭ligerdub


    The participants number is almost certainly an unreliable statistic. They note that:

    "We omitted results from marathon races for which we did not have results for all 11 years from 2008 to 2018.
    We omitted races that did not specify the participant's gender."

    I guess there's probably going to be a fair few where the full data isn't available. There's no real point in publishing that number to be honest.

    There's about 150,000 from this list alone (and some of these would have been higher than the listed amount in 2018).

    https://cheaphotels4uk.com/travel-guide/10-biggest-marathons-uk

    There's also the possibility the participant nation does not equate to the location of the event, but that's not mentioned in the article.


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