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Less draw weight

  • 17-04-2019 9:00am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 1,036 ✭✭✭ Banbh


    Is there a way of reducing draw weight (apart from taking a plane to the bow of course)? Would a longer string reduce the amount of arc of the bow when it is drawn and therefore reduce the draw weight?


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 7,494 ✭✭✭ BrokenArrows


    Banbh wrote: »
    Is there a way of reducing draw weight (apart from taking a plane to the bow of course)? Would a longer string reduce the amount of arc of the bow when it is drawn and therefore reduce the draw weight?

    Assuming you're shooting recurve if you have ILF limbs then you usually get 5-10% adjustment by adjusting the tiller bolts.

    Screwing the bolts in further increases the poundage and screwing out reduces poundage. When you are winding them out make sure you leave at least 3 full twists of the bolts screwed in for safety.

    When adjusting make sure to keep the distance from the bottom of the limb to the string almost equal. The top limb should be a tiny bit more than the bottom.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,036 ✭✭✭ Banbh


    It's a Samick Revenge, one piece.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,035 ✭✭✭ Wabbit Ears


    Twisting the string to make it shorter increases draw weight and untwisting makes it lighter. A longer string would make a bow a little bit easier to draw but generally you get strings at set lengths so you're talking a custom string a half inch or so longer.

    Really though if your bow is to heavy you should be looking at perhaps buying a lighter draw weight bow.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,036 ✭✭✭ Banbh


    Thank you. I thought that might be the case. I'll try a longer strong until I can afford a new bow. Much obliged.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,494 ✭✭✭ BrokenArrows


    Just an FYI,

    Changing the poundage via this method has the opposite effect on arrow speed (as long as your still within the optimal brace height range for the bow).

    If you decrease the poundage by having a longer string then the brace height will be shorter. Brace height is the distance from the string to the deepest part of the bow. ie The Grip.

    Because the distance is shorter the string as more room to push the arrow when released so has more time to put energy into the arrow. ie. It goes faster.

    There is generally a sweet spot for the brace height which results in the best combination of arrow speed, vibration, poundage, noise.

    If you lengthen the string you might find that the arrow travels faster, the poundage is less but the vibration and noise from the bow increase.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,036 ✭✭✭ Banbh


    That's very interesting. I always assumed that the tighter/shorter the string meant a faster arrow but what you say makes perfect sense. I must check online to see if the manufacturer of my bow (Samick) has recommended brace heights.

    I'm not one for fiddling about with fittings and settings, like the people you see on You Tube. I just like to take my bow and let fly at my target, dandelions and a clout that's stuck down the field.


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 8,763 Mod ✭✭✭✭ greysides


    I would think that playing with string length/brace height will only effect small changes of draw weight, eithin which you should be able to cope with.

    If you require greater relief, sell it and buy another. Unless you know what you're doing planing the limbs may well destroy it.

    The aim of argument, or of discussion, should not be victory, but progress. Joseph Joubert

    The ultimate purpose of debate is not to produce consensus. It's to promote critical thinking.

    Adam Grant



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