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Dublin Port on foot

  • 07-04-2019 7:05pm
    #1
    Closed Accounts Posts: 1,227 ✭✭✭ Credit Checker Moose


    Is it possible to walk to Dublin Port to catch a ferry as a foot passenger or do you need to be driven in by a vehicle?


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 1,569 ✭✭✭ mugsymugsy


    Is it possible to walk to Dublin Port to catch a ferry as a foot passenger or do you need to be driven in by a vehicle?

    Yeah it's possible just make sure you go to the right terminal depending on Irish ferry or stena.

    Look at rail sail deal online as can be handy for train in uk


  • Registered Users Posts: 25,848 ✭✭✭✭ HeidiHeidi


    And leave plenty of time for the walk, it's a long way down to the ferry terminals!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,227 ✭✭✭ Credit Checker Moose


    mugsymugsy wrote: »
    Yeah it's possible just make sure you go to the right terminal depending on Irish ferry or stena.

    Look at rail sail deal online as can be handy for train in uk
    It is Irish Ferries for the sail rail deal.

    I have never been down there so have no idea on the general geography of the area.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 947 ✭✭✭ Phileas Frog


    There's a shuttle bus you can catch from the city centre


  • Registered Users Posts: 25,848 ✭✭✭✭ HeidiHeidi


    It is Irish Ferries for the sail rail deal.

    I have never been down there so have no idea on the general geography of the area.
    It's just over 2 miles from the Luas stop at the Point to the ferry terminal.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,227 ✭✭✭ Credit Checker Moose


    There's a shuttle bus you can catch from the city centre
    Do you have any details on this?


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,416 ✭✭✭ vandriver


    Turn up East Wall Rd past the point,take a right into Alexandra Rd.Go down to the end take a left,then a right and follow the road around.
    But....as a taxi driver...people are frequently amazed how far it is from say O'Connell St to the ferry terminals.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 26,661 ✭✭✭✭ OldMrBrennan83


    Do you have any details on this?

    https://www.dublinpublictransport.ie/dublin-port-bus

    Morton's and the DB 53.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 26,661 ✭✭✭✭ OldMrBrennan83


    vandriver wrote: »
    Turn up East Wall Rd past the point,take a right into Alexandra Rd.Go down to the end take a left,then a right and follow the road around.
    But....as a taxi driver...people are frequently amazed how far it is from say O'Connell St to the ferry terminals.

    Would be about an hour walk going well without any bags. Deceivingly long from looking at it on a map.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,418 ✭✭✭ highdef


    Would be about an hour walk going well without any bags. Deceivingly long from looking at it on a map.
    An hour from where? From the LUAS stop at The Point to where you would actually step onto the ship, it's just over 3km. Assuming you just have a regular backpack and you're not weighed down with several heavy bags, that walk can easily be done in about 30 minutes if you're not old, disabled in any way and are in any sort of reasonably healthy state.

    Walking from O'Connell Street would bring the total walk time up to about 1 hour with a journey distance approaching 5.5km.

    Both are entirely doable for the vast majority of people. I work in Dublin and go for a 5/6km brisk walk every lunchtime when weather permits (not walking today because of the rain.....booooo) so on any given work week, I will do the O'Connell Street to Irish Ferries terminal walk 5 times.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 26,661 ✭✭✭✭ OldMrBrennan83


    highdef wrote: »
    An hour from where? From the LUAS stop at The Point to where you would actually step onto the ship, it's just over 3km. Assuming you just have a regular backpack and you're not weighed down with several heavy bags, that walk can easily be done in about 30 minutes if you're not old, disabled in any way and are in any sort of reasonably healthy state.

    Walking from O'Connell Street would bring the total walk time up to about 1 hour with a journey distance approaching 5.5km.

    Both are entirely doable for the vast majority of people. I work in Dublin and go for a 5/6km brisk walk every lunchtime when weather permits (not walking today because of the rain.....booooo) so on any given work week, I will do the O'Connell Street to Irish Ferries terminal walk 5 times.

    I was thinking an hour from city centre.


  • Registered Users Posts: 20,920 ✭✭✭✭ Alun


    It may be doable on foot, but I don't think it would be the most pleasant of walks given the time of day you'd be doing it and the amount of heavy traffic on the roads around the port at that time especially if you're carrying any significant amount of luggage.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,125 ✭✭✭ eldamo


    I took a walk up with a colleague last week, his dad is going through with a truck for the first time shortly (usually rosslare) and wanted some scouting done.
    While it's perfectly doable on foot it's not very nice, not much in the way of pedestrian crossings, footpaths disappear without much warning.
    Know yourself, if you are young fit and able and with a backpack go for it, it's an adventure.
    If you have a rolly suitcase and will feel hassled and harried get the 53 bus instead.

    Heading myself by car this summer, happy that we did the reccy, I am used to rosslare, dublin port is a labyrinth! (i'll be fine but i will be leading a convoy of n00bs so it's nice to have a bit of extra confidence)


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,416 ✭✭✭ vandriver


    highdef wrote: »
    An hour from where? From the LUAS stop at The Point to where you would actually step onto the ship, it's just over 3km. Assuming you just have a regular backpack and you're not weighed down with several heavy bags, that walk can easily be done in about 30 minutes if you're not old, disabled in any way and are in any sort of reasonably healthy state.

    Walking from O'Connell Street would bring the total walk time up to about 1 hour with a journey distance approaching 5.5km.

    Both are entirely doable for the vast majority of people. I work in Dublin and go for a 5/6km brisk walk every lunchtime when weather permits (not walking today because of the rain.....booooo) so on any given work week, I will do the O'Connell Street to Irish Ferries terminal walk 5 times.
    If everyone was as young fit and healthy as you,us poor taxi drivers would be out of work.


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,459 ✭✭✭✭ road_high


    I got the ferry from Holyhead as a foot passenger lately (first time ever!) and was amazed how long and slow the bus was from the terminal. All in all a good hour from leaving the terminal to Westmoreland st. Granted it was very wet and the ferry very busy, the driver chronically slow also. Wouldn’t fancy walking it especially if raining. It’s a maze just to try get out of the port itself


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,418 ✭✭✭ highdef


    vandriver wrote: »
    If everyone was as young fit and healthy as you,us poor taxi drivers would be out of work.
    I'm not particularly young!


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,388 ✭✭✭ Nermal


    Was there ever a proposal to send the Luas there?


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,418 ✭✭✭ highdef


    Nermal wrote: »
    Was there ever a proposal to send the Luas there?

    Apart from a narrowish section of roadway on East Wall Road, around the corner from where the LUAS line currently ends, the path to the Irish Ferries terminal is actually pretty much intact and in fact there area already train tracks there for much of its length. It is the wrong gauge, however it would be relatively simple to make it dual gauge as much of it is perfectly straight.

    The main issue though would be whether it would be worth the cost. Not sure how many foot passengers use Irish Ferries and I would also say not too many people in the docks would use the LUAS. Maybe when Britain leaves the EU, foot passenger numbers may increase due to duty free booze, cigarettes, etc.

    Would all depend on the cost though. I'm sure the maths has already been done. At best, I would imagine that trams would only run to and from the Irish Ferries terminal close to boarding and unboarding times. However, if the cruise industry picks up further, short spurs could be added to wherever the cruise ships dock. These would not cost a huge amount and it would enable cruise ship passengers very convenient and rapid transit to the city centre and being tourists, fare evasion would be extremely minimal.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,416 ✭✭✭ vandriver


    highdef wrote: »
    Apart from a narrowish section of roadway on East Wall Road, around the corner from where the LUAS line currently ends, the path to the Irish Ferries terminal is actually pretty much intact and in fact there area already train tracks there for much of its length. It is the wrong gauge, however it would be relatively simple to make it dual gauge as much of it is perfectly straight.

    The main issue though would be whether it would be worth the cost. Not sure how many foot passengers use Irish Ferries and I would also say not too many people in the docks would use the LUAS. Maybe when Britain leaves the EU, foot passenger numbers may increase due to duty free booze, cigarettes, etc.

    Would all depend on the cost though. I'm sure the maths has already been done. At best, I would imagine that trams would only run to and from the Irish Ferries terminal close to boarding and unboarding times. However, if the cruise industry picks up further, short spurs could be added to wherever the cruise ships dock. These would not cost a huge amount and it would enable cruise ship passengers very convenient and rapid transit to the city centre and being tourists, fare evasion would be extremely minimal.

    Cruise ship business is being curtailed from next year .


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,420 ✭✭✭✭ Losty Dublin


    highdef wrote: »
    Apart from a narrowish section of roadway on East Wall Road, around the corner from where the LUAS line currently ends, the path to the Irish Ferries terminal is actually pretty much intact and in fact there area already train tracks there for much of its length. It is the wrong gauge, however it would be relatively simple to make it dual gauge as much of it is perfectly straight.

    There's 3-4 freight trains a day serving the port area. Regauging them for Luas is a non runner.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,418 ✭✭✭ highdef


    There's 3-4 freight trains a day serving the port area. Regauging them for Luas is a non runner.

    I never said anything about re-gauging. I said it would be relatively easy to make the current tracks dual gauge to allow the very few freight trains plus the LUAS trams to use the same permanent way.


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,502 ✭✭✭✭ loyatemu


    highdef wrote: »
    I never said anything about re-gauging. I said it would be relatively easy to make the current tracks dual gauge to allow the very few freight trains plus the LUAS trams to use the same permanent way.

    its simply not worth it - foot passengers for the ferry easily fit on a bus. Cruise liners organise their own transport. The usage patterns would not be sufficient to justify running the Luas down there (and I don't think reusing the existing freight track would save much on the cost).


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