Advertisement
If you have a new account but are having problems posting or verifying your account, please email us on [email protected] for help. Thanks :)
Private profiles - please note that profiles marked as private will soon be public. This will facilitate moderation so mods can view users' warning histories. All of your posts across the site will appear on your profile page (including PI, RI). Groups posts will remain private except to users who have access to the same Groups as you. Thread here
Some important site news, please read here. Thanks!

Alcohol free service

  • 21-03-2019 9:44pm
    #1
    Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 25,714 Mod ✭✭✭✭ looksee


    Trying to establish for a visitor how the above service on the Galway train is monitored. They will have a couple of bottles of whisky in their suitcase and are concerned about the statement 'alcohol may not be brought onto the train'.

    I don't recall that the similar situation on the Waterford train was supervised to any extent, unless people were unruly, they haven't suddenly got more fussy about it I assume?


«1

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 24,744 ✭✭✭✭ Wishbone Ash


    looksee wrote: »
    ...They will have a couple of bottles of whisky in their suitcase...
    Are they just transporting the whiskey in their luggage or do they intend drinking it on the train?


  • Registered Users Posts: 29,295 ✭✭✭✭ Mint Sauce


    My guessing that rule applies to consumption on the train. Unopened, in a bag, case, holdall, etc. Fine.


  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 25,714 Mod ✭✭✭✭ looksee


    Just transporting. Its all a storm in a teacup (or shot glass) as I don't think Irish Rail will pay any attention but I don't want to say go ahead if IR have suddenly got more fussy - though I don't see them inspecting suitcases in any situation.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,480 ✭✭✭✭ Jamie2k9


    No problem taking it on the train.

    Irish Rail alcohol free services are not enforced and only refers to consumption.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,372 ✭✭✭✭ elperello


    You would hope that sanity will prevail in this instance but IE have threatened to confiscate drink brought onto certain train services.

    A profoundly stupid policy.

    A bottle of whiskey in a visitors luggage will not cause any harm.

    Give that we live in a whiskey producing country where Government policy has actively encouraged the establishment of local distilleries and visitor centres makes it even more ridiculous.


  • Advertisement
  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,291 ✭✭✭ lbc2019


    IR do not search baggage


  • Registered Users Posts: 24,744 ✭✭✭✭ Wishbone Ash


    looksee wrote: »
    ... a couple of bottles of whisky...
    Hopefully they may clamp down on those who spell it without an 'e' regardless of whether it's Scotch or American! :pac:


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,372 ✭✭✭✭ elperello


    lbc2019 wrote: »
    IR do not search baggage

    One would sincerely hope not.

    But they did say

    "The company said from October 12th it will cease alcohol sales on these trains and will confiscate bottles and cans from those who attempt to bring them on board."

    They have only themselves to blame for any confusion among visitors.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,291 ✭✭✭ lbc2019


    I hate hen parties/stag parties on trains. I support Irish Rail.


  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 25,714 Mod ✭✭✭✭ looksee


    Hopefully they may clamp down on those who spell it without an 'e' regardless of whether it's Scotch or American! :pac:

    I only have passing acquaintance with it and can never remember which way round the 'e's go :D Ah, e for Eire in the Irish one...

    Another little mystery solved.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 10,372 ✭✭✭✭ elperello


    lbc2019 wrote: »
    I hate hen parties/stag parties on trains. I support Irish Rail.

    I also hate stag/hen parties on trains but I wish IE would deal with the people causing trouble rather than issuing stupid press releases.


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 11,490 Mod ✭✭✭✭ BeerNut


    looksee wrote: »
    I only have passing acquaintance with it and can never remember which way round the 'e's go :D Ah, e for Eire in the Irish one...

    Another little mystery solved.
    The e was added by Dublin distillers and only later became a convention on the whole island -- Paddy didn't adopt it until the 1970s IIRC. There's a new wave of Irish distilleries who have decided to drop the e again, considering "whisky" to be the more authentic traditional spelling for them.

    On topic, I see the Enterprise has gone alcohol free now as well, according to the notices in the carriages. It took me a while to spot them and nobody bothered me with my open-carry train beers.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,291 ✭✭✭ lbc2019


    elperello wrote: »
    I also hate stag/hen parties on trains but I wish IE would deal with the people causing trouble rather than issuing stupid press releases.

    they did, they banned alcohol on the services with the most alcohol issues.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,372 ✭✭✭✭ elperello


    lbc2019 wrote: »
    they did, they banned alcohol on the services with the most alcohol issues.

    What I would consider dealing with loutishness and bad behaviour on trains is to directly deal with the perpetrators.

    What they have done is to inconvenience ordinary decent passengers who might enjoy a drink or two and make those who may have bottles of drink in their luggage feel as if they are smugglers.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,291 ✭✭✭ lbc2019


    elperello wrote: »
    What I would consider dealing with loutishness and bad behaviour on trains is to directly deal with the perpetrators.

    What they have done is to inconvenience ordinary decent passengers who might enjoy a drink or two and make those who may have bottles of drink in their luggage feel as if they are smugglers.

    When it escalates to the point it did on the Waterford and Galway lines I side with IR, how do you suggest they decide who can have a drink and who cannot? I'm sure those that told they can't while others drink will be very understanding...

    If you want to drink go on a service that allows it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,549 ✭✭✭ YFlyer


    First class trolling.


  • Registered Users Posts: 910 ✭✭✭ XPS_Zero


    elperello wrote: »
    What I would consider dealing with loutishness and bad behaviour on trains is to directly deal with the perpetrators.

    What they have done is to inconvenience ordinary decent passengers who might enjoy a drink or two and make those who may have bottles of drink in their luggage feel as if they are smugglers.


    I get what you are saying, but think about it. If you are on a long distance journey (some journeys in Ireland are 3-4 hours on the western routes) it's hard to just deal with the bad guys. While you are trying to get them to voluntarily leave the train:


    • The train has to stop at the next station and wait for cops, probably in a rural area where there might be a long wait

    • In the mean time the crew might have the legal right to expel them from the train but not the physical capability or it may be unsafe to do so

    • Then you have the other passengers waiting around journey delayed to deal with these guys.


    Just to give a really simple example, about a month ago I was on a DART at Monkstown and this traveler guy screaming hysterically at his girlfriend got on the train and as he was having a screaming match with her (her on platform him on the train) he was backing up to step on and off the train every second or two. So we could not leave. I briefly considered just getting up and shoving him to the ground because the prat was holding us up a good 5 minutes at this stage (which is a long time to be stalled at one stop). Then the doors close and were on our way. But I thought what happens if the doors don't close, now I'm delaying us even more when a fight breaks out.
    That was a simple situation, in daytime, when he was sober.


    Imagine 10 or them hammered off their face, aggressive, big guys, and you have only a driver and a catering girl on your train to deal with them between intercity stops.



    If I was an IE manager I'd go with the simple route of just restricting drink.


    There are many areas where ordinary people have hassle to deal with louts, I was running away from my place one day when two cops came out of nowhere and stopped me they'd been searching for someone who matched my description, it was aggrivating but I'd prefer they check such things out than not, the liquid ban on airlines is almost comical, but that , like the alcohol policy is for the decent passengers safety too.


    They seem to have struck a reasonable balance between letting people get on with having a good time and restricting abuse.



    The search rule may also be a 'cover your ass in case' rule. When I was working as an RA in the student apartments on campus there was a rule on the books: no parties. Of course it was preposterously unrealistic to think there would be no parties in student accomidation, but the rule wasn't there to be enforced with everyone, it was there in case people got too loud and disruptive to other people who might have an exam the next day, so it was enforced in those cases, because without it you'd get all kinds of "well how loud is too loud then...there was a louder party yesterday you did nothing, across the way there". That rule allowed you to say "well technically you're not meant to be having them at all, so if you head to town by midnight (most of these were predrinkers) we'll let it go". THis may be same thing


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,372 ✭✭✭✭ elperello


    XPS_Zero, I take on board your points but I disagree that passengers who conduct themselves properly should have to forgo a simple drink because there are hordes of trouble makers who will not.

    One of the USP's of train travel is that one can enjoy a drink during the journey.

    Restricting the liberties of the majority rather than dealing with the mis-deeds of the minority is all too common nowadays.

    With regard to drinks we have other examples

    1- Minimum Unit Pricing which when introduced will increase the price of drink to everybody because some people drink too much.
    2- Licensing Hours which mean that if you are heading to a Sunday lunch with friends you can't buy a bottle of wine until 12.30.


    Don't get me wrong, I'm well able to sit on a train for a few hours without drinking but as a fare paying passenger I'd rather choose for myself than suffer for the wrongs of others.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,480 ✭✭✭✭ Jamie2k9


    The ban is never enforced, security only travel on Waterford and maybe the ex Galway Sunday. Even them its not enforced and the drivers ignore the alarm they get from people smoking.

    Drivers view it as not there problem which is true to a degree and you can expect the same from customer service staff.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,291 ✭✭✭ lbc2019


    elperello wrote: »
    XPS_Zero, I take on board your points but I disagree that passengers who conduct themselves properly should have to forgo a simple drink because there are hordes of trouble makers who will not.

    One of the USP's of train travel is that one can enjoy a drink during the journey.

    Restricting the liberties of the majority rather than dealing with the mis-deeds of the minority is all too common nowadays.

    With regard to drinks we have other examples

    1- Minimum Unit Pricing which when introduced will increase the price of drink to everybody because some people drink too much.
    2- Licensing Hours which mean that if you are heading to a Sunday lunch with friends you can't buy a bottle of wine until 12.30.


    Don't get me wrong, I'm well able to sit on a train for a few hours without drinking but as a fare paying passenger I'd rather choose for myself than suffer for the wrongs of others.

    Id rather have a peaceful journey with a drink at the end than a free for all on the train. Expecting staff to be able police problem drinking is naive and beyond their remit


  • Advertisement
  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,291 ✭✭✭ lbc2019


    elperello wrote: »
    What I would consider dealing with loutishness and bad behaviour on trains is to directly deal with the perpetrators.

    What they have done is to inconvenience ordinary decent passengers who might enjoy a drink or two and make those who may have bottles of drink in their luggage feel as if they are smugglers.

    How should Irish Rail police it?


  • Registered Users Posts: 26,406 ✭✭✭✭ Eric Cartman


    looksee wrote: »
    Trying to establish for a visitor how the above service on the Galway train is monitored. They will have a couple of bottles of whisky in their suitcase and are concerned about the statement 'alcohol may not be brought onto the train'.

    I don't recall that the similar situation on the Waterford train was supervised to any extent, unless people were unruly, they haven't suddenly got more fussy about it I assume?

    watched a student down half a 70cl of captain morgans before handing over the bottle on the galway to dublin a few months back, security really just dont want drink in hand customers but dont check bags.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,372 ✭✭✭✭ elperello


    lbc2019 wrote: »
    Id rather have a peaceful journey with a drink at the end than a free for all on the train. Expecting staff to be able police problem drinking is naive and beyond their remit
    lbc2019 wrote: »
    How should Irish Rail police it?

    As I said before I'd like to see the troublemakers taken to task for their actions.
    There is nothing naive about that.

    In most well ordered countries they deal with trouble on trains by stopping the train and removing the problem passengers.
    If IR adopted such a policy for a few weekends with co-operation from AGS you would see a change in behaviour.

    IR should also have a dedicated transport police.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,291 ✭✭✭ lbc2019


    elperello wrote: »
    As I said before I'd like to see the troublemakers taken to task for their actions.
    There is nothing naive about that.

    In most well ordered countries they deal with trouble on trains by stopping the train and removing the problem passengers.
    If IR adopted such a policy for a few weekends with co-operation from AGS you would see a change in behaviour.

    IR should also have a dedicated transport police.

    they did that, but the problems persisted, hence the ban

    #NotAllTrains


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,372 ✭✭✭✭ elperello


    lbc2019 wrote: »
    they did that, but the problems persisted, hence the ban

    #NotAllTrains

    I didn't know that, thanks.


  • Registered Users Posts: 294 ✭✭ mickey15ie


    Do they monitor if people are drinking alcohol on these services?

    Seems a bit over the top to be honest, if people are being too roudy, boot them off, banning everyone is a bit over the top.


  • Registered Users Posts: 910 ✭✭✭ XPS_Zero


    mickey15ie wrote: »
    Do they monitor if people are drinking alcohol on these services?

    Seems a bit over the top to be honest, if people are being too roudy, boot them off, banning everyone is a bit over the top.




    Unlike NI there is no conductor or guard on each train with IE, I think there is on Cork but not always the rest. Just the driver and the catering staff (who can't expel a trespasser as they're not representing the company)


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,480 ✭✭✭✭ Jamie2k9


    XPS_Zero wrote: »
    Unlike NI there is no conductor or guard on each train with IE, I think there is on Cork but not always the rest. Just the driver and the catering staff (who can't expel a trespasser as they're not representing the company)

    CSOs on many services now, Waterford/Sligo/Limerick not sure about Galway yet.

    It is monitored to a degree and those who make online bookings get notifications and there is announcements before boarding. This didn't happen until a few months ago. Then there is security on selected services.

    Guards/Hosts or CSO by in large are a complete waste of time and money....


  • Registered Users Posts: 294 ✭✭ mickey15ie


    Jamie2k9 wrote: »
    CSOs on many services now, Waterford/Sligo/Limerick not sure about Galway yet.

    It is monitored to a degree and those who make online bookings get notifications and there is announcements before boarding. This didn't happen until a few months ago. Then there is security on selected services.

    Guards/Hosts or CSO by in large are a complete waste of time and money....

    Was asking as i am having my own stag in a few weeks time and we were going to get the train and have a few beers on the way down. not much damage you can do in 2hrs like :)


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 12,363 ✭✭✭✭ Del.Monte


    mickey15ie wrote: »
    Was asking as i am having my own stag in a few weeks time and we were going to get the train and have a few beers on the way down. not much damage you can do in 2hrs like :)

    Lol.. young people today - no stamina. :D


Advertisement