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chiropractor recommendation

  • 18-02-2019 1:03pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 205 ✭✭ Snorlaxx


    Hey Folks,
    Can someone recommend a chiropractor in Waterford based on experience please.

    Have an upper back/lower neck issue I need to get looked at.

    Cheers


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 5,018 ✭✭✭ hardybuck


    Snorlaxx wrote: »
    Hey Folks,
    Can someone recommend a chiropractor in Waterford based on experience please.

    Have an upper back/lower neck issue I need to get looked at.

    Cheers

    I would seriously consider a physio or physical therapist as an alternative or in conjunction with what you're planning.

    I went to Jill Dunlop but was in a bad state afterwards.

    I had a reoccurance years later in Dublin, went to a guy who I thought did an OK job and improved it, but ultimately it was the physio who corrected the issue and made it sustainable for the long term.

    My wife had it as well and went to the physio who sorted it all much quicker.


  • Registered Users Posts: 384 ✭✭ dango


    In this day and age, people still consider chiropractors legitimate? It's quackery at its finest.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,012 ✭✭✭ fricatus


    Talk to a physio. They're properly trained in the workings of the musculo-skeletal system.

    Chiropractic is (in case you're unaware) "alternative medicine", i.e. not medicine at all. The surgeon who operated on my wife's back and sorted out the awful pain she was suffering, said to her that it was a good thing she hadn't gone to a chiropractor because they usually do more harm than good.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,018 ✭✭✭ hardybuck


    fricatus wrote: »
    Talk to a physio. They're properly trained in the workings of the musculo-skeletal system.

    Chiropractic is (in case you're unaware) "alternative medicine", i.e. not medicine at all. The surgeon who operated on my wife's back and sorted out the awful pain she was suffering, said to her that it was a good thing she hadn't gone to a chiropractor because they usually do more harm than good.

    I was in bits after my treatment in Waterford.

    Initial relief was quickly replaced by terrible pain. I was barely able to get into work to sit at a desk for a good month, struggling to sleep for probably a month too, and unable to exercise for probably 2-3 months.

    If you combine some physical therapy with exercise you'll hopefully address it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,268 MsGiggles


    I found John Dineen really good when I went to him a couple of years ago (Office in the Manor Village) - Suffer with bad sciatica - not sure what you need help with, but I couldn't fault him.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 824 ✭✭✭ debok


    Bodyworks down Johnstown business part. 3 lads in there very good for injuries


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,046 ✭✭✭✭ _Brian


    Proper chartered physiotherapist is what you need, not a physical therapist and definitely not a chiropractor, they’re just a bunch of quacks. Plenty of gathered information on the damage they cause


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,268 MsGiggles


    _Brian wrote: »
    Proper chartered physiotherapist is what you need, not a physical therapist and definitely not a chiropractor, they’re just a bunch of quacks. Plenty of gathered information on the damage they cause

    Not sure if I completely agree with this one - I know they fixed my problem for me - But then again I don't think I was going for treatment on something too severe - So perhaps I shall bow down to the experts on this one !! :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,042 ✭✭✭ kuang1


    hardybuck wrote: »
    I would seriously consider a physio or physical therapist as an alternative or in conjunction with what you're planning.

    I went to Jill Dunlop but was in a bad state afterwards.

    I had a reoccurance years later in Dublin, went to a guy who I thought did an OK job and improved it, but ultimately it was the physio who corrected the issue and made it sustainable for the long term

    My wife had it as well and went to the physio who sorted it all much quicker.

    Sorry to hear you had a bad experience, but I've found Gill Dunlop to be brilliant. So much so that I also bring my 9 year old to see her 2/3 times a year.

    To answer the OP's question (rather than criticise his/her personal preference for which type of treatment he/she seeks) Gill Dunlop is around a long time and doesn't over-treat; 100% recommend her.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,012 ✭✭✭ fricatus


    kuang1 wrote: »
    To answer the OP's question (rather than criticise his/her personal preference for which type of treatment he/she seeks)

    If the OP knows that a chiropractor is an "alternative therapist" and chooses that treatment route, well that's fine and they're entitled to spend their money whichever way they wish. However if they're under the impression that a chiropractor is just who you see if you've a bad back, i.e. some sort of back doctor, then I think it's fair enough that some of us would point this out. It's not criticism of the OP's choices.

    Ultimately such people are not properly qualified to treat medical issues, and the methods they use are unproven at best. Labels like "alternative medicine" are unhelpful too. If a therapy or treatment displays results in properly controlled tests, then it just becomes known as "medicine". We don't have "alternative bridge-engineering methods" for example, just proven ones.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,042 ✭✭✭ kuang1


    fricatus wrote: »
    Ultimately such people are not properly qualified to treat medical issues, and the methods they use are unproven at best. Labels like "alternative medicine" are unhelpful too. If a therapy or treatment displays results in properly controlled tests, then it just becomes known as "medicine". We don't have "alternative bridge-engineering methods" for example, just proven ones.

    Oh my. This does indeed sound truly dangerous.
    Have the authorities been alerted?
    These charlatans need to be run out of town immediately!

    Thanks for the lesson. I'm grateful.
    So "not displaying results in properly controlled tests" must equal a con-job that can ever be trusted and everyone involved in such jobs are theives/chancers/cowboys.

    Gotcha.

    The idiots on boards are in endless supply twould seem.


  • Registered Users Posts: 205 ✭✭ Snorlaxx


    fricatus wrote: »
    if they're under the impression that a chiropractor is just who you see if you've a bad back, i.e. some sort of back doctor
    Cheers Fricatus, that was the impression I was under. Never needed one before so error on my part.
    Physio seems to be the proper route to go in this case as its a situation that just started few weeks ago and I know how it happened, not a long term thing


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,493 ✭✭✭ thomasm


    Have used the chiropractor Patrick Caroll before and found him excellent. Know many people who use him and swear by his abilities. I know he has resolved issues for me and would recommend.

    As an aside I’ve tried lots of options with my back and the best thing I’ve ever done for it is yoga.


  • Registered Users Posts: 26,191 ✭✭✭✭ Wanderer78


    thomasm wrote:
    Have used the chiropractor Patrick Caroll before and found him excellent. Know many people who use him and swear by his abilities. I know he has resolved issues for me and would recommend.


    Patrick Carroll is an osteopath, and I'd also highly recommend him, he can be very busy at times though. He sometimes recommends exercises such as pilates, yoga, etc, I'd also recommend some foam rolling as well.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,493 ✭✭✭ thomasm


    Wanderer78 wrote: »
    Patrick Carroll is an osteopath, and I'd also highly recommend him, he can be very busy at times though. He sometimes recommends exercises such as pilates, yoga, etc, I'd also recommend some foam rolling as well.


    Your right, I meant to say he was an osteopath and a better option for back/musculoskeletal issues.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,347 ✭✭✭ RubyK


    For back issues, I would recommend you visit Nigel O'Connor in Sommervile Tramore, he's a physical therapist and very good. But if he can't fix you, he will send you to the right person.


  • Registered Users Posts: 226 ✭✭ treatyman


    _Brian wrote: »
    Proper chartered physiotherapist is what you need, not a physical therapist and definitely not a chiropractor, they’re just a bunch of quacks. Plenty of gathered information on the damage they cause

    One thing I don't like about Boards is people who make absolute sweeping incorrect statements like above. Chiropractors have their place in health care for sure and the majority are excellent. I'm sure 4/5 years in college studying anatomy, physiology and musculoskeletal assessment and treatment they have much more knowledge and understanding than Brian I'd imagine.

    As for IAPT trained Physical Therapists who are now recognized until CORU are to the same level if not far better in my opinion at assessing and treating musculoskeletal conditions that chartered physios as their training is so focused on assessing and diagnosis. I've had a personal experience on being misdiagnosed by 3 Chartered Physios but being correctly diagnosed by a IAPT trained Physical Therapist, have also had an excellent Chartered Physio sort me out for a different injury.

    It's the same as any other profession, there are good and not so good to come out from the same training.


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