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Camera for Architecture

  • 08-02-2019 11:43am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 11


    Hi guys, I am working for an Architecture firm and need to find a new camera for the practice, we all only have basic knowledge of cameras which we hope to remedy soon, but we are in the market for a new camera now..

    Our budget is approx 1000 euro for camera and lens but can stretch higher if the jump in quality is worth it..

    Our shots will mainly need to get as much light in as possible to make the shots really feel bright and airy... mostly outdoor shots but there will be internals too so I don't know how that changes things

    Thanks for the help.


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 7,693 ✭✭✭Bluefoam


    Hi guys, I am working for an Architecture firm and need to find a new camera for the practice, we all only have basic knowledge of cameras which we hope to remedy soon, but we are in the market for a new camera now..

    Our budget is approx 1000 euro for camera and lens but can stretch higher if the jump in quality is worth it..

    Our shots will mainly need to get as much light in as possible to make the shots really feel bright and airy... mostly outdoor shots but there will be internals too so I don't know how that changes things

    Thanks for the help.

    I'd suggest a Canon M series camera... A M50 or M6 or M5. You'll be able to get one with a kit lens and the wide angle 11-22mm Zoom for less than 1k.

    Theres lots of other options, but this is a great combo & isn't too big or heavy for site work. Also, wide lenses are often expensive, but the M series wide zoom is great value.


  • Registered Users Posts: 36,162 ✭✭✭✭ED E


    If this is something that will be a business generator for you consider a pro. No point saving a few euro on photos that will lose you a 10k contract down the line.


    I say this as an amateur photog.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,693 ✭✭✭Bluefoam


    ED E wrote: »
    If this is something that will be a business generator for you consider a pro. No point saving a few euro on photos that will lose you a 10k contract down the line.


    I say this as an amateur photog.

    I would agree that finished photos should be done professionally, but there are plenty of site, constuction, fitout and abstract photos that should be taken by the architect or designers...


  • Registered Users Posts: 36,162 ✭✭✭✭ED E


    True, hadnt really considered WIP stuff.


  • Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators Posts: 23,157 Mod ✭✭✭✭Alanstrainor


    ED E wrote: »
    If this is something that will be a business generator for you consider a pro. No point saving a few euro on photos that will lose you a 10k contract down the line.


    I say this as an amateur photog.

    Yes I'd tend to agree. A lot of the work of a pro goes into the post processing. Making the photos looks bright and airy would likely mean a decent amount of work in post to get a really good image. That and skill with the camera and composition.

    But since we're in the camera forum... There are a lot of cameras under budget that would cover your needs, there are lots from Canon/Nikon. Since I'm a Canon shooter that's what I'll stick to.

    Camera: Canon 800D, a very capable camera that would do everything you need in terms of photos. It has a 24MP sensor which is well regarded. And the kit lens is a good starting point.
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Canon-EOS-800D-Digital-18-55mm/dp/B07142XNR9/ref=sr_1_22?ie=UTF8&qid=1549642656&sr=8-22&keywords=canon+dslr

    Additional Lens: For architecture and internal shots, a wide angle is a must. This 10-18mm is very good value and would give you that wide goodness.
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Canon-18mm-4-5-5-6-Lens/dp/B00K899B9Y/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1549642671&sr=8-2&keywords=canon+10-18mm

    IMO, given your shots are all going to be static, ie buildings and rooms; a tripod is a must. Using a tripod will mean you can use long shutter speeds and low ISOs. This will mean clean and bright images as you can keep the shutter speed low. This is a good tripod, you could go cheaper but since I am still under budget I think, I reckon it's a good shout:

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Manfrotto-Element-Traveller-Tripod-Ball/dp/B0734ZBN6X/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1549643039&sr=8-9&keywords=tripod+manfrotto

    And then we have the question of post processing. What program to use? The obvious choice, and the one most photogs go for is lightroom. This is a subscription service and comes in at around 12eur a month (for individuals at least). It is the best photography software available. Again I would say a must for proper photography.

    My 2 cents at least...


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  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Arts Moderators, Entertainment Moderators Posts: 9,047 CMod ✭✭✭✭CabanSail


    Really most DSLR's will do the job. Get a good Tripod and a decent quality Wide Zoom. Find a pro and get them to show you how to set it all up and shoot some RAW images. Then deliver those RAW files to the Pro to carry out the Post Production (for a fee) Then get them to do the final shoot themselves. If you enter into a professional relationship with a photographer they will advise you on the equipment and may even know where to get some good used items. Doing this will be get much better results than trying to do it yourself.

    Can you imagine if I were to say .... I am a photographer but I want to design a new Home/Studio. Can you advise a good drawing package so I can do my own architecture and I may get a pro in to finish the job off.


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