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Huge Greenland Hiawatha Glacier Crater

  • 15-11-2018 9:42am
    #1
    Closed Accounts Posts: 2,196 ✭✭✭ Zorya


    Must confess I love this kind of stuff. A huge 19 mile wide crater has been mapped beneath the ice in Greenland. It could be as recently as about 12000 years old.

    Okay, I admit it, though I am not a fan of him personally, as he is so damn arrogant, still I have time for Graham Hancock's theories about earlier civilisations being wiped out by comet impact. Why not? Randall Carlson speaks on it as well. The Younger Dryas Impact hypothesis theory. This comet could possibly match the dates.... I cannot see why it is (is it?) completely dismissed.

    Here is the recent finding.

    https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/nov/14/impact-crater-19-miles-wide-found-beneath-greenland-glacier

    And Video.




    Younger Dryas Imapct hypothesis - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Younger_Dryas_impact_hypothesis

    46300159_401.jpg


Comments

  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Technology & Internet Moderators Posts: 87,663 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Capt'n Midnight


    The most amazing thing is that the deep ocean floor that covers two thirds of our planet is very young because it keeps gets recycled. Very little of it is over 150 million years old.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,196 ✭✭✭ Zorya


    The possibility that this is so recent is very interesting.
    The impact of the mile-wide iron meteor was equivalent to 47 million times the energy of the Hiroshima bomb (:eek:)
    Imagine if that happened now - well my imagination says it would obliterate our civilisations down to dust, there would be no traces left of anything , but I could be wrong. 47 million nuclear bombs though!

    Ages and ages ago I remember hearing a snippet on radio (maybe 25 years ago even) about some research done in an Irish University that showed the last ice age disappeared very abruptly. Cannot for the life of me find it now. I know there is more recent research that shows ice ages happen very quickly, but as far as I remember this was about the melt off being really fast. If I have remembered even vaguely correctly then surely an impact like this would have burned off an ice age really quickly? Or - conversely - even caused the brief (well, 1000+ years) Younger Dryas cool period that reversed previous warming trends?

    Leaving aside all of Randall Carlson's gematria and sacred geometry fancies for a moment, he does speak of soil formations that could only have happened with massive fires and sudden water inundation. I can't sieve through all his stuff to find references.


    Regardless of hypothesis - the Younger Dryas happened. Extreme cold, huge floods and mass extinctions. Same could happen anytime.


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Technology & Internet Moderators Posts: 87,663 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Capt'n Midnight


    Zorya wrote: »
    Ages and ages ago I remember hearing a snippet on radio (maybe 25 years ago even) about some research done in an Irish University that showed the last ice age disappeared very abruptly.


    In 2008 a Danish ice drilling project in Greenland identified that the ice age ended 11,711 years previously.

    ( Possibly on July 19th :pac: )


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators, Regional Abroad Moderators Posts: 8,130 CMod ✭✭✭✭ Fathom


    Comparatively. Massive, undiscovered ocean impacts?


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Technology & Internet Moderators Posts: 87,663 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Capt'n Midnight


    Fathom wrote: »
    Comparatively. Massive, undiscovered ocean impacts?
    We'd have no way of knowing.

    Unless there was secondary evidence on land or in the shallows. Like tsunami or secondary impacts from ejecta. It could explain some mass extinctions.


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  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators, Regional Abroad Moderators Posts: 8,130 CMod ✭✭✭✭ Fathom



    Unless there was secondary evidence on land or in the shallows. Like tsunami or secondary impacts from ejecta. It could explain some mass extinctions.
    Pre-history and lacking geologic evidence.


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