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Church of Ireland parish registers to be digitised

Comments



  • Other CoI records have gone onto irishgenealogy.ie so it would make most sense to put them there and I'd be amazed if they weren't free.

    Records not held in the RCBL will presumably stay wherever they are.

    I'd expect them to be subject to the data protection rules set down for the civil registers.

    Genealogy Forum Mod





  • pinkypinky wrote: »
    Records not held in the RCBL will presumably stay wherever they are.

    Would be great to see all CofI records together and accessable.




  • pinkypinky wrote: »
    I'd expect them to be subject to the data protection rules set down for the civil registers.

    Makes sense and would be good if applied to all church records.




  • Just had a thought though: COI records up to 1870 are public records (established church), after that, they aren't.

    Other churches' records have never been public so the state is not likely to ever gain control of them.

    I also note Claire Santry's report is now updated to say they will be on irishgenealogy.ie and the COI statement says over time they will also include registers in local custody not just in the RCBL.

    Genealogy Forum Mod





  • pinkypinky wrote: »
    I also note Claire Santry's report is now updated to say they will be on irishgenealogy.ie and the COI statement says over time they will also include registers in local custody not just in the RCBL.

    Excellent news!

    https://www.ireland.anglican.org/news/8247/100000-grant-supports-digitisation-of


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  • I presume these records have no significance whatsoever for researchers whose families were all catholic? Hoping I'm wrong.




  • Sometimes Catholics were married or baptised in CoI churches so there may be some significance.




  • hblock21 wrote: »
    I presume these records have no significance whatsoever for researchers whose families were all catholic? Hoping I'm wrong.
    Hermy wrote: »
    Sometimes Catholics were married or baptised in CoI churches so there may be some significance.

    I was just about to ask the same question. I wonder how often that actually happened, Catholics 'using' COI places of worship? Has anyone here ever come across it in their research? I've never really understood why it would happen, actually.




  • In practice, I think it's only use of burial grounds that we find RCs in COI churches.

    Genealogy Forum Mod





  • pinkypinky wrote: »
    In practice, I think it's only use of burial grounds that we find RCs in COI churches.

    A few "missing" marriages on Roots Ireland for me turned out to be COI marraiges (presumably the spouse was) when I could eventually see the GRO image. I also have members of my family that seemed to forget which religion they were between censuses and occasionally children! Political expediency for jobs on one side and nationalist agitation on the other I think; one extremely English/Anglican surname becoming a Catholic land agitator in the late 1800s and his son being in the IRA in 1919 is much more likely to be explained by expediency than a change in faith.


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  • I have a few surnames in my tree that look like ¨planter¨ stock. Think they married into catholic families in early 19th. century. Hoping that CofI records might assist there.




  • hblock21 wrote: »
    I presume these records have no significance whatsoever for researchers whose families were all catholic? Hoping I'm wrong.

    In 1863, my distant relative, Ellen Murphy, a Catholic, married Protestant William Morton at Clondagad, Co Clare. I first came across this marriage in the Familysearch marriages database. It is also referenced in the Ennis COI marriage index.
    William was employed as a coachman for Protestant landlord William H Ball of Fortfergus. I rather suspect that if William had converted to Popery at that time it may well have cost him his job, for Major Ball was not on friendly terms with the local Catholic clergy. So William remained a Protestant for most of his life, until in 1913, at age 75, Ellen finally persuaded him to convert to Catholicism. He died a Catholic four years later.
    I have no way of knowing how common such mixed marriages were, but I put this forward as one example of how the digitisation of COI records can be of assistance even to researchers of Catholic forebears.




  • Any update on this project?




  • No. Keep an eye on Claire Santry's blog, but it'll likely be at least a year if not more.

    Genealogy Forum Mod





  • Had forgotten about this project - anyone have an update?





  • No, but safe to say it's delayed by Covid.

    Genealogy Forum Mod



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