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Dublin marathon runner banned for doping

  • 15-08-2018 2:43pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 15,704 ✭✭✭✭


    https://www.irishtimes.com/sport/other-sports/dublin-marathon-runner-banned-for-anti-doping-violation-1.3597164
    Canadian distance runner Natasha Yaremczuk has been banned for 18 months after failing an anti-doping test in the Dublin marathon last October, which she claimed was the result of a food supplement.

    The 38 year-old Yaremczuk, who lives in the US, finished as the 10th best woman overall in Dublin, in a time of 2:52:38....
    ...
    In the reasoned decision, Yaremczuk admitted that she had been using a B-12 supplement XMBurn since 2014, but was unaware that it contained the specified substances

    XMburn works to temporarily increase metabolism, suppress
    appetite and help you make smarter food choices to lose
    unwanted pounds and maintain a healthier weight.

    sounds legit


«1

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 19,482 ✭✭✭✭Krusty_Clown


    I'm surprised to read that a 10th place finisher was drug tested (and somewhat impressed). Any indication that it was random selection?


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,808 ✭✭✭Tigerandahalf


    What sort of dosage would she have been taking to get a doping failure? Most people are taking some sort of vitamin supplement but I presume this lady was taking a really high dosage.


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,704 ✭✭✭✭RayCun


    I'm surprised to read that a 10th place finisher was drug tested (and somewhat impressed). Any indication that it was random selection?

    There's prize money for 10th place. I don't know if all prize winners were tested or a selection of them.
    What sort of dosage would she have been taking to get a doping failure? Most people are taking some sort of vitamin supplement but I presume this lady was taking a really high dosage.

    Are most people taking vitamin supplements?
    Are most people taking supplements that promise to suppress your appetite and boost your metabolism?

    She represented Canada at triathlon. She can't claim ignorance.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,549 ✭✭✭Cape Clear


    RayCun wrote: »
    There's prize money for 10th place. I don't know if all prize winners were tested or a selection of them.



    Are most people taking vitamin supplements?
    Are most people taking supplements that promise to suppress your appetite and boost your metabolism?

    She represented Canada at triathlon. She can't claim ignorance.

    An elite athlete claims that she is unaware of taking banned substances shocker!

    Complete lack of investigative journalism from The Irish Times here. Looks as if they are happy to report the findings without questioning the dopers claims.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,368 ✭✭✭✭Murph_D


    Cape Clear wrote: »
    An elite athlete claims that she is unaware of taking banned substances shocker!

    Complete lack of investigative journalism from The Irish Times here. Looks as if they are happy to report the findings without questioning the dopers claims.

    Interesting that the second quote above, (the one that says XMB “helps you make smarter food choices”) has been removed from the article (assuming that’s where it originated?)

    But what’s to be investigated? The athlete has accepted the result and presumably the consequences.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,549 ✭✭✭Cape Clear


    Murph_D wrote: »
    Interesting that the second quote above, (the one that says XMB “helps you make smarter food choices”) has been removed from the article (assuming that’s where it originated?)

    But what’s to be investigated? The athlete has accepted the result and presumably the consequences.

    The athlete has claimed the use of the banned substance came from a vitamin supplement which goes unquestioned in the article. Can we believe the claims of a confessed doper?


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,340 ✭✭✭TFBubendorfer


    Cape Clear wrote: »
    An elite athlete claims that she is unaware of taking banned substances shocker!

    Complete lack of investigative journalism from The Irish Times here. Looks as if they are happy to report the findings without questioning the dopers claims.

    The offender is convicted and banned. The case is closed.

    Apart form the fact why the Irish Times should waste time and money to investigate a Canadian who had come 10th last year and whose story won't be of interest to anyone in Ireland, what is there left to be investigated?

    Even if the banned substance didn't come from the supplement, what actual difference would that make now?


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,704 ✭✭✭✭RayCun


    Murph_D wrote: »
    Interesting that the second quote above, (the one that says XMB “helps you make smarter food choices”) has been removed from the article (assuming that’s where it originated?)

    no, that was me looking up the supplement - that's how they advertise it


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,549 ✭✭✭Cape Clear


    The offender is convicted and banned. The case is closed.

    Apart form the fact why the Irish Times should waste time and money to investigate a Canadian who had come 10th last year and whose story won't be of interest to anyone in Ireland, what is there left to be investigated?

    Even if the banned substance didn't come from the supplement, what actual difference would that make now?

    The IT has always branded itself as the paper of record. Failure to question claims is hardly consistent with it's slogan.

    Doping is doping it doesn't matter if the runner finished 1st, 10th or last and I'm sure this story is of interest to most people who took part in the race.

    Records also show that this athlete was disqualified from a sprint triathlon in 2011 for reasons unknown.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,368 ✭✭✭✭Murph_D


    One problem is that, if the journalist states that the athlete is lying (or makes other allegations that undermine her character or reputation), and the athlete then sues for defamation, under our defamation laws the article would be assumed to be defamatory unless the newspaper can prove otherwise.

    It's one thing to prove doping based on the results of a test; quite another to prove what's going on in someone's head - unless of course the athlete had been previously banned for using this particular supplement and therefore could be reasonably assumed to be aware of its nature.

    Simply not worth it (from paper's point of view) to imply the athlete is a liar.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 117 ✭✭echat


    According to the Times there were two substances

    Natasha Yaremczuk, 38, from Paris in Ontario, tested positive for two prohibited substances — 1,3-dimethylbutylamine (DMBA) and higenamine — after the race last October.

    Higenamine is a supplement that allows the lungs to take in more oxygen. DMBA, which is found in certain weight loss and sports supplements, was banned because of its potentially fatal reported side-effects, which included heart problems and nervous system disorders. The substances were banned last year but were not outlawed when Yaremczuk bought them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 973 ✭✭✭pc11


    Cape Clear wrote: »
    The IT has always branded itself as the paper of record. Failure to question claims is hardly consistent with it's slogan.

    Doping is doping it doesn't matter if the runner finished 1st, 10th or last and I'm sure this story is of interest to most people who took part in the race.

    Records also show that this athlete was disqualified from a sprint triathlon in 2011 for reasons unknown.

    What are you on about? That's not how news works. The paper is reporting a news item. Investigative pieces are completely different. They only do them occasionally and they take a lot of time and money and effort. They don't 'investigate' an ordinary news item. There is nothing to 'investigate' here.

    Go look around a newspaper and count how many news items there are and how many 'investigative journalism' pieces there are and come back to us.


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,823 ✭✭✭✭average_runner


    pc11 wrote: »
    What are you on about? That's not how news works. The paper is reporting a news item. Investigative pieces are completely different. They only do them occasionally and they take a lot of time and money and effort. They don't 'investigate' an ordinary news item. There is nothing to 'investigate' here.

    Go look around a newspaper and count how many news items there are and how many 'investigative journalism' pieces there are and come back to us.

    Exactly, and it doesn't make financial sense for them to investigate. Its not a high profile athlete or near it


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,549 ✭✭✭Cape Clear


    pc11 wrote: »
    What are you on about? That's not how news works. The paper is reporting a news item. Investigative pieces are completely different. They only do them occasionally and they take a lot of time and money and effort. They don't 'investigate' an ordinary news item. There is nothing to 'investigate' here.

    Go look around a newspaper and count how many news items there are and how many 'investigative journalism' pieces there are and come back to us.

    An elite athlete tests positive for a banned substance at DCM plenty to see here. Bury your head in the sand if you wish but there is no need to lecture me on the inner workings of the media.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 620 ✭✭✭Djoucer


    Cape Clear wrote: »
    An elite athlete tests positive for a banned substance at DCM plenty to see here. Bury your head in the sand if you wish but there is no need to lecture me on the inner workings of the media.

    Think someone needs to lecture you on it.

    Short of a lie detector test, the story is complete.
    Tests positive.
    Admits to using supplement.
    Supplement and substance both identified.
    She claims it was a mistake.
    Receives ban.
    Newspaper reports all of the above.
    People read it and make their own mind up.

    That's it. What's the next option?


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,074 ✭✭✭BeepBeep67


    Cape Clear wrote: »
    An elite athlete tests positive for a banned substance at DCM plenty to see here. Bury your head in the sand if you wish but there is no need to lecture me on the inner workings of the media.

    She's not an elite athlete


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,399 ✭✭✭Lazare


    Cape Clear wrote: »
    An elite athlete tests positive for a banned substance at DCM plenty to see here. Bury your head in the sand if you wish but there is no need to lecture me on the inner workings of the media.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v7acD4q0lp0


  • Registered Users Posts: 973 ✭✭✭pc11


    Cape Clear wrote: »
    An elite athlete tests positive for a banned substance at DCM plenty to see here. Bury your head in the sand if you wish but there is no need to lecture me on the inner workings of the media.

    Oh dear.

    Oh dear, oh dear.


    Did you try looking at a paper like I asked you?


    Also this


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,370 ✭✭✭pconn062


    BeepBeep67 wrote: »
    She's not an elite athlete

    Exactly, barely even sub elite. Nice to see her get busted but who cares beyond that.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,414 ✭✭✭Testosterscone


    pconn062 wrote: »
    Exactly, barely even sub elite. Nice to see her get busted but who cares beyond that.

    Personally I think a sub elite getting busted could well put the fear into some and wake them up to the idea that they are responsible for what they put into their body at any level.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,370 ✭✭✭pconn062


    Personally I think a sub elite getting busted could well put the fear into some and wake them up to the idea that they are responsible for what they put into their body at any level.

    I agree, but my point was more in relation to "why don't the Irish Times do more do investigate it??", rather than the violation itself. She's a sub elite athlete from Canada, why would they bother investigating it more?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,170 ✭✭✭Hard Worker


    The Dublin Marathon organise testing to be carried out on the international winners, the Irish winners and some random tests on those in the top 10.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,134 ✭✭✭rom




  • Registered Users Posts: 10,368 ✭✭✭✭Murph_D


    What happens in this case? She is stripped of her placing - is an attempt made to recover the prize money and award to the next finisher?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,417 ✭✭✭Glencarraig


    pconn062 wrote: »
    Exactly, barely even sub elite. Nice to see her get busted but who cares beyond that.

    The lady who finished 11th would care as she is now due a few shillings in prize money.


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,823 ✭✭✭✭average_runner


    The lady who finished 11th would care as she is now due a few shillings in prize money.

    But thats nothing to do with the times or most of its readers


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,417 ✭✭✭Glencarraig


    But thats nothing to do with the times or most of its readers

    I dont read the times, I'm an independent man !


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,823 ✭✭✭✭average_runner


    I dont read the times, I'm an independent man !

    It be in the independant next week after the daily mail covers it


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,823 ✭✭✭✭average_runner


    The lady who finished 11th would care as she is now due a few shillings in prize money.

    Only if the other person returns the money?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,417 ✭✭✭Glencarraig


    Only if the other person returns the money?

    If the organisers were to do the decent thing and pay the new 10th place runner and then go looking for reimbursement from the banned runner the majority of the running fraternity would say "well done".


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