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Classic as a daily driver - E24 635 CSI

  • 15-07-2018 12:38pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 115 ✭✭ supue


    i'm toying with the idea of buying a classic as a daily driver - currently a big fan of the 635 CSI E24 - especially the blue colour similar to the one in this ad: https://www.carzone.ie/used-cars/bmw/6-series/used-1987-bmw-6-series-cork-fpa-26655298677221

    I have a newer car which the wife is now using most of the time for bringing the kids around in and weekend trips, I generally like the idea of keeping a nice classic on the road as a second car. Am I completely wide of the mark in assuming a well kept / restored version from the UK would be a runner for a 50km round trip five days a week? A work colleague mentioned classic tax / insurance covering up to 10K a year in mileage - I presume it's straightforward to pay extra if you're going over this?

    Are there a couple of specialists for general servicing maintenance or would I need to be back and forth to the UK for this - would €2-3K a year for specialist servicing / rust treatment / etc. be the norm?

    Any other considerations I should be thinking of? Also, presume there's no issue with having youngish kids in the back for creche drop-offs, currently waiting for the youngest to manage the belts in his car seat so I wouldn't have to worry about rear doors :D


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 1,039 ✭✭✭ MrCostington


    I'd be interested in the replies here, I'm thinking the same with a Mercedes W123.

    Re the mileage, I think you will find the 10k is in MILES not KM at least with First Ireland and some other I rang, and I double checked with them. So your commute is 8,000 miles, plus whatever else you do.

    I'd imagine if you asked for more than 10,000 they would be 'on to ' you as it where. FI gave the option of 2,4 or 10k IIRC

    PS beaut of a car!


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,472 ✭✭✭ Seweryn


    supue wrote: »
    Are there a couple of specialists for general servicing maintenance or would I need to be back and forth to the UK for this - would €2-3K a year for specialist servicing / rust treatment / etc. be the norm?
    I can't see why you would need a specialist for general servicing - these cars are simpler than anything else and can be easily serviced by their owners.
    I'd be interested in the replies here, I'm thinking the same with a Mercedes W123.
    I was using an S123 300TD for about four years as my main car a few years ago. They are capable of anything once you start with a good example and service it as required (engine, gear, differential oils, coolant, brake fluid, filters, valve clearance adjustment, etc.). Occasional repairs may be required as with any car. I can't remember my S123 needed anything special apart from servicing. The only thing I remember was the rear brake caliper started getting sticky. That would require removing the caliper, cleaning, applying some grease (with new seals) and putting it back, bleeding the system, etc.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,059 ✭✭✭ Kenny Logins


    I drove a 635 daily for about 5 years, school runs and all. They're mechanically very basic, and you certainly don't need any specialist servicing. I do all mine myself, even as far as a new head gasket. They are thirsty though, and my policy only allowed me 6k miles. Rust is the big issue, and can be hidden very well deep behind wings etc.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,492 ✭✭✭ Car99


    Unless you're good with DIY car maint and can afford to buy a very good rust free example of an E24 635 ( very rare ) which you can afford to devalue by putting 10k miles per year on it don't buy any old large engine BMW as a DD.

    If you think it is a cheaper option because of classic tax and insurance it's not.

    A 635 will be doing sub 20 mpg meaning 10k miles will cost over 3k a year in petrol.

    BMW's of this era rust and rust slot.

    Also driving one , the things we take for granted in a modern car are not the same in classics.. For instance wipers that actually clear the window at a decent rate and demisters that work quickly are not so good in a old BMW. ABS if it has it is very slow in operation compared to anything recent.

    Id say a 635 is ok for a nice summer dry day but as DD in Ireland I'd have to say its not practical and definitely not a cheaper option.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,059 ✭✭✭ Kenny Logins


    387hp LOL

    There's a nicer series one on DD at the moment, low miles, great condition and LPG conversion (not sure about this mod...).

    https://www.donedeal.ie/vintagecars-for-sale/bmw-635-csi/19277896


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  • Registered Users, Subscribers Posts: 13,031 ✭✭✭✭ antodeco


    My policy allows 4000 miles per year, so I would check this out!


  • Registered Users Posts: 115 ✭✭ supue


    Thanks for the replies guys - definitely not up to speed on all things classic 😀 I didn’t realise the policies were so tight on miles, can you just pay regular insurance on it rather than the classic ones?

    It’s a beautiful looking car and main thing was owning something that’d look great throughout its life whilst I had it more than any other costs. Current gens look dated when new cycle of models come out and are two a penny for the standard family saloons, a nice classic is always going to look well.

    I wouldn’t rate myself as a mechanic, but presume with a Haynes manual I’d get by! Main concern as you say seems to be rust and getting a good one - reading through some of the links here there seem to be some decent garages specialising in renovations and places like the Old Colonel. I presume the likes of these aren’t going to sell a rust bucket?

    I saw some beautiful pics of BMW E9’s and then saw their prices so hopped along quickly 😂 Similarly the E24 M6 whilst looking nicer are ridiculous cash - whereas seem to be well looked-after examples of the CSI around the £20-25K mark from what I see. How does VRT work on classic imports?


  • Registered Users Posts: 115 ✭✭ supue


    Also, I’ve seen a few ads where garages said they upgraded brakes to better versions so they were more similar to modern saloons. I’d be happier with this safety-wise, once you keep the originals I presume there’s no huge impact here on the cars?

    Again - no issue living without some of the toys when you can drive a car that gives you enjoyment!


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,059 ✭✭✭ Kenny Logins


    VRT on a car over 30 years old is fixed at €200. There is no Haynes for E24, but E28 (M535i) is close enough for most areas, and there is a Bentley manual. Bigcoupe.com is very helpful. BTW Series one (pre '82) E24s are E12 based - firstfives.org is a great resource in this case.

    You could get a very good example of an E24 for under €15k here.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,059 ✭✭✭ Kenny Logins


    supue wrote: »
    Also, I’ve seen a few ads where garages said they upgraded brakes to better versions so they were more similar to modern saloons. I’d be happier with this safety-wise, once you keep the originals I presume there’s no huge impact here on the cars?

    Again - no issue living without some of the toys when you can drive a car that gives you enjoyment!

    Brakes can be upgraded to E38 rotors and calipers if you really want to, but not cars all have ABS. Discs all round, servo, and 4 pot calipers up front are standard and stop just fine.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 115 ✭✭ supue


    VRT on a car over 30 years old is fixed at €200. There is no Haynes for E24, but E28 (M535i) is close enough for most areas, and there is a Bentley manual. Bigcoupe.com is very helpful. BTW Series one (pre '82) E24s are E12 based - firstfives.org is a great resource in this case.

    You could get a very good example of an E24 for under €15k here.

    Am I looking at the wrong sites - I’ve rarely seen any on Carzone which is my default? Any other suggestions here or is it DoneDeal?


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,059 ✭✭✭ Kenny Logins


    Donedeal, yeah. I do know of one possibly for sale here in Cork, it's an '81, Henna red, manual box. I could give you a number.


  • Registered Users Posts: 115 ✭✭ supue


    Preference is an automatic as my wife doesn’t drive manuals :rolleyes: No harm in dropping a PM, it's realistically an early next year option once the two year old’s seatbelt training completes. I really don’t fancy the hardship of trying to get him in daily for the next few months!
    My wife is also a fan so that’s half the battle :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,059 ✭✭✭ Kenny Logins


    There's only one on DD at the moment, but I have seen a few over the past couple of months and they are becoming less frequent.

    Munich Legends has one, but (relatively) big money
    http://www.munichlegends.co.uk/item/bmw-e24-635-csi-73158-2


  • Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators Posts: 17,032 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Henry Ford III


    Rotors?


  • Registered Users Posts: 115 ✭✭ supue



    I’d spotted that one in the past few days - looks great, not the ideal colour but that’s the range I was considering for picking up a decent one.


  • Registered Users Posts: 87 ✭✭ tom petty


    I have one .

    Yes you could one as a daily but you really have to be a "hands on" type of guy for it to be a success .
    Body condition is paramount and the youngest being 28 years old now it's unlikely you will find an example that is factory original. A forensic examination is required to establish the condition and standard of repairs that will have been done over it's life . The design of the bodyshell is archaic in comparison to more modern cars and that's where you maintenance money will go.
    There are two distinct models , the earlier E12 based car and the later post '82 E28 based chassis . They are two entirely different cars and sourcing parts for them requires diligence and an awareness of what you are looking for.You will have to become fairly knowledgeable to source and select the correct parts when needed. Mechanical parts are , so far , all available and the reliability of the engine and transmission is generally good ,especially with a proven service history. Body and trim parts are a little more challenging and getting more expensive as the value of the cars rise. Be wary of breakers as they all seem to think the E24 is on par with E9's now.
    I have the earlier E12 based car but I'd advise you to look at the later E28 based model simply as it is is more "modern" in it's operation.
    The vast majority of cars sold in UK were auto's and you will pay a hefty premium for a manual . Later autos were ECU controlled and if it was me I'd go for a model with the ZF 4HP 22 auto which is simple and very strong.
    When buying originality is king . Avoid the "personalised " ones as someway down the line you will want to sell and if they continue to increase in value that's what buyers will want .
    The interior is 2 +2 with limited rear legroom space especially if you are tall , sports seats are infinitely more comfortable than the wryly named comfort equivalents .
    I could go on and on about what and where to look on an E24 as after spending over 2 years restoring mine I got to see every little corner and cavity of it but all I would say is be very careful and thorough in your evaluation of any potential purchase.
    They are lovely cars , I particularly like and prefer the earlier model , but as a daily there are many equally enjoyable , practical and admirable cars with the same solid investment potential as the E24.
    As for DD Insurance , I'd be getting firm quotes before I went any further ......


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,059 ✭✭✭ Kenny Logins


    Rotors?

    Discs. I must be watching too much YouTube. :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 115 ✭✭ supue


    tom petty wrote: »
    I have one .

    Yes you could one as a daily but you really have to be a "hands on" type of guy for it to be a success ......

    Thanks for the summary and guidance Tom. I curiously hoped you’d posted a pic of it here and came across your thread in post a pic of your car. For the record, I am NEVER going to be your kind of hands on :eek:

    That's a beautiful example you have there and a phenomenal amount of work you’ve done on it! It’s one of those restored ones I want, I can do oil changes ;)


  • Registered Users Posts: 101 ✭✭ gavman1


    Owning a clasic car is like having a love/hate relationship with a puppy.when they **** on your new rug you hate them but when they are running right and on that summers day and your at the lights and every head is turning to have a look at your motor with desire in there eyes,thats when it will all make sence.go for it with your eyes open.sounds like you have a decent budget so take your time and go to the uk.maybe try piston heads?good look.


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  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators, Regional East Moderators Posts: 58,856 CMod ✭✭✭✭ unkel


    That's a lovely comparison. None of us had dogs growing up and then we got a puppy Labrador late last year. To say we were in for a shock in our newly refurbished house with all new furniture would be an understatement :eek:

    Dog is nearly 10 months old now and we love her to bits.

    "Wind is Ireland's oil" - An Taoiseach, 25/05/2022



  • Registered Users Posts: 5,092 ✭✭✭ James Bond Junior


    I did over 150 miles on a round trip in my semi classic today. It didn't skip a beat and I totally forgot the weeks wages in spent on labour alone last week in order to be able to drive it. I wouldn't daily it as I think it would defeat the purpose.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 778 Jack Moore


    I drove a 635 daily for about 5 years, school runs and all. They're mechanically very basic, and you certainly don't need any specialist servicing. I do all mine myself, even as far as a new head gasket. They are thirsty though, and my policy only allowed me 6k miles. Rust is the big issue, and can be hidden very well deep behind wings etc.

    I did a daily commute of 80 miles for a year in an e24
    Petrol is an issue but great reliable car.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 778 Jack Moore


    Car99 wrote: »
    Unless you're good with DIY car maint and can afford to buy a very good rust free example of an E24 635 ( very rare ) which you can afford to devalue by putting 10k miles per year on it don't buy any old large engine BMW as a DD.

    If you think it is a cheaper option because of classic tax and insurance it's not.

    A 635 will be doing sub 20 mpg meaning 10k miles will cost over 3k a year in petrol.

    BMW's of this era rust and rust slot.

    Also driving one , the things we take for granted in a modern car are not the same in classics.. For instance wipers that actually clear the window at a decent rate and demisters that work quickly are not so good in a old BMW. ABS if it has it is very slow in operation compared to anything recent.

    Id say a 635 is ok for a nice summer dry day but as DD in Ireland I'd have to say its not practical and definitely not a cheaper option.

    Wipers and demister on an e24 are grand. 18mpg if you take it handy :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,059 ✭✭✭ Kenny Logins


    Jack Moore wrote: »
    I did a daily commute of 80 miles for a year in an e24
    Petrol is an issue but great reliable car.

    I have 26k odd miles up on mine. The head gasket gave up out of old age (was on from new), but beyond that and service items, I only had to replace a fuel pump relay, strut top bearings, drive shaft giubo, control arm bushes and an alternator earth strap. Nothing major. :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 110 ✭✭ mmolloy01


    I have a 635csi for 4 years now. I would agree with what Tom Petty has said above.

    They are a great car, and I love it.
    Would I use it for 50km round trip every day ? I am not so sure.

    Mechanical they are sound, with servicing fairy straight forward. You will have things like plastics / pipes cracking, causing vacuum leaks etc.
    Getting one with a decent body is the key. They all have rust. It is a question of how much, and how was it treated. The worst ones are where there has been a cover up job done...

    The downsides as a DD for me vs more modern cars would be wipers, demister, braking (double check that), sound system, if you need a child seat, check that they will fit and of course fuel costs.

    Best of luck whatever you decide...


  • Registered Users Posts: 2 simo_gu


    Im gutted to be selling my e24

    Its on adverts if anyone here wants to havd a look


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 25,535 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Dades


    simo_gu wrote: »
    Im gutted to be selling my e24

    Its on adverts if anyone here wants to havd a look
    Throw a link up in this thread.


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