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Ireland 2040

  • 06-07-2018 1:58pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 137 ✭✭


    Hi there,

    A question which has been bugging me for some time (possibly, somewhat naive).

    Fine Gael's website talks of their 2040 plan. 2040 is some 21 years away. How can any political party publish and work towards a long-term plan for the country when there is no guarantee of their power/presence politically in the future.

    For instance, if part of the 2040 plan was to, let's say, build a new motorway that would take 6 years to complete; how can any government commence this project knowing that it mightn't be possible to complete this plan if they're not reelected? Does the new incoming government retain responsibility for the completion of projects commenced by previous governments?

    Sorry if this is a 'noob' question! :confused:


Comments

  • Technology & Internet Moderators Posts: 28,789 Mod ✭✭✭✭oscarBravo


    Think about it for a second. If no government could commit to beginning something that might take longer than their current term, no public project taking longer than five years could ever be started, which makes no sense.

    A future government may disagree with a project in progress that was started by a previous government, but at that stage it may not make sense not to bring it to completion.


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,276 ✭✭✭✭ArmaniJeanss


    Yeah, ultimately it's a flaw in democracy in that you theoretically can't plan anything which goes beyond the expected length remaining of the current parliament.

    Realistically all you can do is hope that the next government(s) will also see the merit in your plans and continue them, or that they accept that because the process is already 20%/40/60% complete then it might as well be finished.
    But no guarantees at all.


  • Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 67,467 Mod ✭✭✭✭L1011


    FFs old NDPs all over-ran the terms of the Dail they were done under.

    If you stop governments from long term planning, nothing long-term gets done.

    An incoming government is unlikely to throw out a project that is substantially underway even if its not yet under construction - it can and has happened of course.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,762 ✭✭✭Sheeps


    I can't see how they aim to achieve that level of population growth in this period of time when they cant even figure out the numbers on housing right now. They're already off to a bad start. The merits of it are mostly good, however the execution of the plan will ultimately lead to its downfall, like everything in this country.


  • Registered Users Posts: 16,686 ✭✭✭✭Zubeneschamali


    Sheeps wrote: »
    I can't see how they aim to achieve that level of population growth in this period of time

    They are not aiming to achieve that level of population growth.

    They are saying that level of population growth is happening, like it or not, and we had better plan to be ready for it.


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  • Moderators, Entertainment Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 14,335 Mod ✭✭✭✭marno21


    There appears to be a lot of confusion between two seperate documents published by the Government back in February.

    1. National Planning Framework - often referred to as the Ireland 2040 plan - exactly as it says on the tin - a policy designed to bring in place a planning framework that will deliver an Ireland in 2040 as envisaged in the plan, which will also absorb the additional million people that will be around then. It's not a document that plans how we will grow our population, it just tries to ensure that the country will be able to cater for these million people that will be here whether we like it or not.
    2. National Development Plan 2018-2027 - a capital investment plan full of projects that facilitate the implementation of the 2040 plan that will be delivered between 2018 and 2027. A ten year plan is sensible as there are a number of projects that will take upto 10 years to implement (Metro, DART Expansion, Cork-Limerick motorway etc)


  • Registered Users Posts: 20,397 ✭✭✭✭FreudianSlippers


    marno21 wrote: »
    There appears to be a lot of confusion between two seperate documents published by the Government back in February.

    1. National Planning Framework - often referred to as the Ireland 2040 plan - exactly as it says on the tin - a policy designed to bring in place a planning framework that will deliver an Ireland in 2040 as envisaged in the plan, which will also absorb the additional million people that will be around then. It's not a document that plans how we will grow our population, it just tries to ensure that the country will be able to cater for these million people that will be here whether we like it or not.
    2. National Development Plan 2018-2027 - a capital investment plan full of projects that facilitate the implementation of the 2040 plan that will be delivered between 2018 and 2027. A ten year plan is sensible as there are a number of projects that will take upto 10 years to implement (Metro, DART Expansion, Cork-Limerick motorway etc)

    Perhaps that confusion comes from the fact that the NDP is actually called:

    "Project Ireland 2040 National Development Plan 2018-2027"

    Government a bit confused themselves? :pac:


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