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Social Housing and Halting Sites Map

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  • 22-04-2018 7:23pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 13


    Hi,

    I'd like to buy a house in Dublin, but I'm still unsure about the safety of the areas. What I've found out is that social housing and halting sites are widespread patchy.

    Is there any comprehensive and, possibly, up-to-date map/database online with all these hotspots?

    I've read other posts here of people who had serious trouble living near those places, so I'd like to avoid passing through that.

    PS: I don't want to be offensive or disrespectful of travellers or people living in social houses, it's just that I need a house in a safe place and I am finding really difficult understanding good and dodgy areas. So this at least could be a starting point (I hope).


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 10,684 ✭✭✭✭Samuel T. Cogley


    Why don't you narrow down an area based on budget then ask people about the area. Social housing is being spread more evenly, as it should be.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,825 ✭✭✭LirW


    Have to second Samuel.
    What's your budget, try look at areas that you can afford and go from there. It can vary a lot from estate to estate too.
    I live in a small estate with a good few council houses in it and the only troublesome party, that moved on a month ago, were private tenants.
    People rule out a big general area when there are troublesome pockets and the rest is absolutely fine.


  • Registered Users Posts: 26,281 ✭✭✭✭Eric Cartman


    sadly OP all you could do is check out an area. Other countries have tools like this but sadly nobody has built anything for Ireland.


  • Registered Users Posts: 506 ✭✭✭eqwjewoiujqorj


    https://maps.pobal.ie/WebApps/DeprivationIndices/index.html

    Obviously not exact but will give you some indication

    XSwsF0H.png


  • Registered Users Posts: 31,059 ✭✭✭✭Lumen


    You don't really need to look at a deprivation map, just drive around the area. It'll be obvious whether it's somewhere you want to live.

    FWIW I lived near a halting site for over a decade and had zero problems.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 68,505 ✭✭✭✭L1011


    The deprivation map is inaccurate to the level of uselessness to say the least on a local level. My area has a lot of retired people who own the houses they live in outright but may have a lower income level from pensions. Not any real level of deprivation; lots of them doing the new Avensis every January and so on.

    Across the road an estate of bigger houses which has lots of student rentals and over-tenanted house shares (bunk beds, beds in living rooms etc) is shown as a notch less deprived. May be more total income going in to those houses but there's nobody well off in them.

    Also, effectively every new development has some social housing in it and there will probably not be many new social only developments of over about 50 units. There shouldn't be the ability for ghetto development as we had in the past.


  • Registered Users Posts: 48 OscarBluth


    Social housing is a terrible metric for 'dodgy,' as is deprivation. If you want to know if an area is dodgy, you need to ask people, drive around it at night, walk around it on foot. Staying in an air b n b for a night or two isn't the worst way to find out what somewhere is like. If you're afraid of the sight of people not wearing designer clothes, then there's only a few pockets of Dublin you'll be comfortable living in anyway: if you're genuinely concerned about crime then its really not as clear-cut as 'avoid these few areas and you'll be grand' as most areas have pockets that are fine and some that are less fine. When I lived in Ballsbridge I frequently got taxis home despite being very close to town as there were on-street prostitutes near my house and I didn't feel very safe there. Living in the south inner city and I'm very happy to walk home, despite walking past a number of large social housing estates on my way. They're perfectly safe and full of perfectly normal people - but the only way to know for sure is to spend time in an area, and talk to people who live there.


  • Moderators, Computer Games Moderators Posts: 15,237 Mod ✭✭✭✭FutureGuy


    https://maps.pobal.ie/WebApps/DeprivationIndices/index.html

    Obviously not exact but will give you some indication

    XSwsF0H.png

    What is the colour scale - blue good, red bad?


  • Registered Users Posts: 625 ✭✭✭heretothere


    FutureGuy wrote: »
    What is the colour scale - blue good, red bad?

    If you click on the little arrow beside the 2016 a scale drops down.

    As others have said social housing is in every estate. It's not a good idea so segregate people off into rich/ poor. I know it does happen but it does creates a 'ghetto'.

    Dublin is a big place and that's a pretty vague question. Even the small town I am from there are areas you wouldn't go into if you're not from there, but over all the town would be seen as a nice place to live. Walk around the areas and see if you do feel safe. Do a food shop, go to a restaurant, cafe, pub, cinema etc and see if you like them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 68,317 ✭✭✭✭seamus


    Lumen wrote: »
    You don't really need to look at a deprivation map, just drive around the area. It'll be obvious whether it's somewhere you want to live.

    FWIW I lived near a halting site for over a decade and had zero problems.
    OscarBluth wrote: »
    Social housing is a terrible metric for 'dodgy,' as is deprivation. If you want to know if an area is dodgy, you need to ask people, drive around it at night, walk around it on foot.
    +1 on both of these.

    It's also worth noting that even where social housing or a halting site has a bad reputation, it's very rare for the anti-social behaviour to spread very far from the immediate surroundings.
    Even the absolute worst halting sites I've heard of basically only caused big trouble for the streets directly surrounding them. Being separated by a house or two seems to be enough to prevent the problem spilling over.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 19,175 ✭✭✭✭MrStuffins


    Isn't it the case that at least 5% of any new development muse be ear-marked for social housing?

    So there will be social housing everywhere.


  • Registered Users Posts: 181 ✭✭TresGats


    You could buy a house in Dublin and both your neighbours could be claiming Housing Assistance Payment (HAP). That's the way things are these days. Social integration rather than ghettoes.


  • Registered Users Posts: 26,281 ✭✭✭✭Eric Cartman


    TresGats wrote: »
    You could buy a house in Dublin and both your neighbours could be claiming Housing Assistance Payment (HAP). That's the way things are these days. Social integration rather than ghettoes.

    putting a little poison in 1000 litres of water is less likely to do damage than putting all the poison together. Its not really social integration, its just diluting the problem over a large area to lessen the stats. Calling it 'social integration' is a bit of a farce, its just not concentrating a problem in one area to make it visible.

    *before anyone starts , not everyone in social housing is bad yada yada yada this spread model does give good families a chance to not be terrorised by crime all day but lets not pretend for one second that its the governments/societies fault that concentrating a load of welfare recipients always ends badly.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,684 ✭✭✭✭Samuel T. Cogley


    putting a little poison in 1000 litres of water is less likely to do damage than putting all the poison together. Its not really social integration, its just diluting the problem over a large area to lessen the stats. Calling it 'social integration' is a bit of a farce, its just not concentrating a problem in one area to make it visible.

    *before anyone starts , not everyone in social housing is bad yada yada yada this spread model does give good families a chance to not be terrorised by crime all day but lets not pretend for one second that its the governments/societies fault that concentrating a load of welfare recipients always ends badly.

    Looks like it's a bit late for that.


  • Registered Users Posts: 122 ✭✭traveller0101


    Looks like it's a bit late for that.

    Your second post in the thread without helping OP ;)


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,684 ✭✭✭✭Samuel T. Cogley


    Your second post in the thread without helping OP ;)

    Very droll. :rolleyes:


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