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Registered to vote, what's the process when going to vote?

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  • 31-03-2018 12:24pm
    #1
    Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 176 ✭✭


    I registered last July in 2017 and I saw my details put on 'checktheregister' site this February.

    I was wondering now when they hold the abortion referendum in May, how I'll vote. I live in Blackrock and according to the site, my polling station is Hollpark N.S. What does this mean?


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 2,645 ✭✭✭endofrainbow


    It means you go to the polling station on the day with your ballot card, which you will receive in the post a few days prior. Your name will be cross checked against the register.

    You will receive your ballot paper , make your selection then put it in the ballot box.

    You might need some form of photographic id.


  • Registered Users Posts: 41,053 ✭✭✭✭Annasopra


    It means you go to the polling station on the day with your ballot card, which you will receive in the post a few days prior. Your name will be cross checked against the register.

    You will receive your ballot paper , make your selection then put it in the ballot box.

    You might need some form of photographic id.

    If for some reason you do not receive a polling card you can still show up with ID and vote anyway

    It was so much easier to blame it on Them. It was bleakly depressing to think that They were Us. If it was Them, then nothing was anyone's fault. If it was us, what did that make Me? After all, I'm one of Us. I must be. I've certainly never thought of myself as one of Them. No one ever thinks of themselves as one of Them. We're always one of Us. It's Them that do the bad things.

    Terry Pratchet



  • Registered Users Posts: 16,686 ✭✭✭✭Zubeneschamali


    You might need some form of photographic id.

    Your polling card will have more details than just the location (like Hollypark N.S.), the individual polling stations will be numbered on it and could be in different rooms. Find the matching desk.

    My very first vote was the first referendum on the 8th amendment and I have never been asked for ID in all the years since, but bring the polling card and ID anyway.


  • Registered Users Posts: 26,333 ✭✭✭✭Peregrinus


    You don't have to bring the pollling card, but the whole process is easier if you do.


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,948 ✭✭✭✭Larbre34


    Peregrinus wrote: »
    You don't have to bring the pollling card, but the whole process is easier if you do.

    I've supervised polling stations on and off for years. Officially, ID is to be requested of 1 in 4 voters, so always bring it. I would always ask for it from someone without a polling card at least. Staff will always try to facilitate a persons vote, including offering the oath or getting someone else to vouch for them, but ID makes things much smoother all round.

    One thing that has long p1ssed me off, is the Govt polling info adverts never seem to stress enough that all people who want to vote MUST MUST MUST be registered, either on the core or supplementary register.

    For example, you would not believe the number of parents who bring along their kid that has recently turned 18 with their passport and want to make a big deal of their first ever vote, which is fair enough but for the fact they never registered them to vote and get all offended when I tell them its not possible, trying to belittle me for making them look bad in front of their family.

    Its simple enough, if your name and address cannot be found on the register, you ain't voting today.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,746 ✭✭✭donegal_man


    As other posters have said, show up and bring some ID. The ID thing is probably less of an issue in rural polling stations where everybody knows everybody else but in larger towns and cities where the staff in the polling station would only know maybe one or two of the electorate it's a good idea to bring it along just in case.
    People showing up with their son/daughter who isn't on the register and being offended when they're told that said offspring can't vote probably never registered themselves. I remember back when I reached eighteen it just seemed to happen automatically, it was only later that I found out the local councilors registered everyone as soon as they left school. As D'unbelievables said, "Vote Maurice Hickey for twenty more years of planning permission and medical cards".


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,758 ✭✭✭Pelvis


    I checked the register yesterday and I am registered at an old address. Looked to update and looks like I need to get a form signed by the guards.. Is that really the only way to change registered address? I'm pretty certain I am only registered at the old address because someone knocked on my family home address and my mother told them I'd moved, and hey presto I got a polling card at last address.


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