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Headling fix up!

  • 19-02-2018 10:10pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 52 ✭✭✭ jimjom


    I'm looking to restore my headling or really just reattach some parts of it that are hanging.
    Has anybody any experience with this sort of job on their classic?
    I've also been keeping my eye out for headling spray adhesive but I haven't come across any here.


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 1,259 ✭✭✭ sogood


    Until recently my daily driver was a 96 XJ6. A sagging headliner was quite a common problem with these cars as the foam on the back of the lining dried up and degraded over time, mostly caused by heat beating down on the roof.

    It was much more common in warmer climates but still happened here in Ireland and it happened to mine. On the Jag, the best solution is to remove the headlining board complete. A lot of bits and pieces need to be removed first and the passenger seat needs to be lowered fully to get the lining board out the rear drivers side door. Some folding/bending is needed, likewise when reinstalling, but it is doable.

    Depending on the type of car it may be easier. The best thing is to then remove the fabric completely as just repairing the bad spots will be a short term fix as the rest will follow suit eventually. After stripping the fabric off it's best to replace it with new. F.J.Keogh motor factors in Glasnevin do this fabric is various colours. Clean the surface of the lining board completely to remove any old dried out foam particles. A nail brush and light sandpaper will do the job.

    Use the old lining as a pattern to cut your new lining. Cut the new lining a tad bigger so you can mark parts of the outer edges for reference points if needed.

    It's no harm to give the lining board a light spray of adhesive to prime it and prevent the next layer of adhesive from soaking in too quickly.

    Lay new fabric down on the lining board and fold it back in half. Spray the exposed part of the board and the fabric to be stuck to it. Any good quality heavy duty spray adhesive will do, similar to that used by upholsterers or carpet fitters.

    Fold the fabric down onto the board, starting along the centre line, working side to side towards the "front" edge. Don't stretch the fabric too much. Better to allow it to tighten as it dries out and leave enough play or slack to work it into any recesses etc. Then fold the other end back and repeat. Leave it to sit for a few hours to stick and dry, before wrestling with it, or hanging it "upside down" as it will be when refitted.

    Wear latex gloves!! Change them frequently!! Work in a clean environment.

    What's the car in question?


  • Registered Users Posts: 52 ✭✭✭ jimjom


    sogood wrote: »
    Until recently my daily driver was a 96 XJ6. A sagging headliner was quite a common problem with these cars as the foam on the back of the lining dried up and degraded over time, mostly caused by heat beating down on the roof.

    It was much more common in warmer climates but still happened here in Ireland and it happened to mine. On the Jag, the best solution is to remove the headlining board complete. A lot of bits and pieces need to be removed first and the passenger seat needs to be lowered fully to get the lining board out the rear drivers side door. Some folding/bending is needed, likewise when reinstalling, but it is doable.

    Depending on the type of car it may be easier. The best thing is to then remove the fabric completely as just repairing the bad spots will be a short term fix as the rest will follow suit eventually. After stripping the fabric off it's best to replace it with new. F.J.Keogh motor factors in Glasnevin do this fabric is various colours. Clean the surface of the lining board completely to remove any old dried out foam particles. A nail brush and light sandpaper will do the job.

    Use the old lining as a pattern to cut your new lining. Cut the new lining a tad bigger so you can mark parts of the outer edges for reference points if needed.

    It's no harm to give the lining board a light spray of adhesive to prime it and prevent the next layer of adhesive from soaking in too quickly.

    Lay new fabric down on the lining board and fold it back in half. Spray the exposed part of the board and the fabric to be stuck to it. Any good quality heavy duty spray adhesive will do, similar to that used by upholsterers or carpet fitters.

    Fold the fabric down onto the board, starting along the centre line, working side to side towards the "front" edge. Don't stretch the fabric too much. Better to allow it to tighten as it dries out and leave enough play or slack to work it into any recesses etc. Then fold the other end back and repeat. Leave it to sit for a few hours to stick and dry, before wrestling with it, or hanging it "upside down" as it will be when refitted.

    Wear latex gloves!! Change them frequently!! Work in a clean environment.

    What's the car in question?

    Thank you very much for that detailed reply.
    Yes, all of the above would be great if I was looking to thoroughly reform the interior but I'm not in this instance.
    The car is question is an E36 but its not going to be worth stripping it from the roof completely. This isn't a perfect car so I'm more looking to see whats possible on a budget.
    I saw online recently a spray adhesive that can would suit but I have as of yet to find it in Dublin.

    The headlining has come down in 3 places.


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 25,535 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Dades


    Double-sided carpet tape if you're really looking for a quick fix!

    That stuff could stick a fish to a wet mirror. ;)


  • Registered Users Posts: 52 ✭✭✭ jimjom


    Dades wrote: »
    Double-sided carpet tape if you're really looking for a quick fix!

    That stuff could stick a fish to a wet mirror. ;)

    Thanks but it hasn't come loose at any edges so no use.


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 25,535 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Dades


    How would you get any adhesive into where you need except via one edge of the headlining?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 52 ✭✭✭ jimjom


    Dades wrote: »
    How would you get any adhesive into where you need except via one edge of the headlining?

    There's a specific spray with a tiny nozzle.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,259 ✭✭✭ sogood


    I really wouldn't put a lot of faith into the attempt to stick the lining back up, while it's still in situ. some people have tried using adhesive, applied using a syringe, but it still tends to gather at the point of application. It can also weep through and show damp/dark spots and is almost impossible to get an even coverage.

    I've also seen little buttons, like thumb tacks, just pressed up into place to hold the lining in position. At the end of the day, there are two ways to do this. The right way and the wrong way.

    I appreciate that you don't want to get into a bigger job, but it's all doable in a couple of hours.


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