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Where to learn?

  • 14-01-2018 1:46pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 767 ✭✭✭ Snowbiee21


    Hi guys I am really interested in people’s interest when looking at model watching . I am myself , haven’t really an idea how to read them only knowing some small bits and blobs. Could anyone tell me in where I can learn online . I’d appreciate your feedback thank you


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 8,200 ✭✭✭ Gaoth Laidir


    I would start here www.theweatherprediction.com. He has really good tutorials on absolutely everything on weather and forecasting, including models.

    For books, I highly recommend these http://www.weathergraphics.com/books/


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,023 ✭✭✭ Donegal Storm


    Sea level pressure and 850hPa temperatures are the two main charts you see posted on here, usually from Meteociel. If you read up on those you'll have a decent idea of what's going on.

    Simplest things to know is that air goes clockwise around high pressure and anti clockwise around low pressure and the closer together the isobars are, the stronger the wind. Those facts alone can give you a pretty good understanding of reading pressure charts. The colours show thickness which you can read up on

    Here's a very rough view of todays setup which has strong low pressure over Iceland and strong high pressure over the Azores which are driving strong south westerly winds over us

    ECM1_0.gif

    Combine that with the 850hPa temp chart to get an idea of airmass temperatures and the precipitation charts for rainfall and it'll give you enough info to be able to make your own basic forecast


  • Registered Users Posts: 767 ✭✭✭ Snowbiee21


    Sea level pressure and 850hPa temperatures are the two main charts you see posted on here, usually from Meteociel. If you read up on those you'll have a decent idea of what's going on.

    Simplest things to know is that air goes clockwise around high pressure and anti clockwise around low pressure and the closer together the isobars are, the stronger the wind. Those facts alone can give you a pretty good understanding of reading pressure charts. The colours show thickness which you can read up on

    Here's a very rough view of todays setup which has strong low pressure over Iceland and strong high pressure over the Azores which are driving strong south westerly winds over us

    ECM1_0.gif

    Combine that with the 850hPa temp chart to get an idea of airmass temperatures and the precipitation charts for rainfall and it'll give you enough info to be able to make your own basic forecast
    Really appreciate it , thank you!


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 10,465 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Meteorite58


    Some good facts here too and if you search back through the threads you will find links to other material.

    http://www.metlink.org/secondary/key-stage-4/weather-systems/#depression


    http://weatherfaqs.org.uk/node/142


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,785 ✭✭✭ piuswal


    Snowbiee21 wrote: »
    Hi guys I am really interested in people’s interest when looking at model watching . I am myself , haven’t really an idea how to read them only knowing some small bits and blobs. Could anyone tell me in where I can learn online . I’d appreciate your feedback thank you

    https://www.metoffice.gov.uk/learning/learn-about-the-weather

    might be worth a look also


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,785 ✭✭✭ piuswal


    Snowbiee21 wrote: »
    Hi guys I am really interested in people’s interest when looking at model watching . I am myself , haven’t really an idea how to read them only knowing some small bits and blobs. Could anyone tell me in where I can learn online . I’d appreciate your feedback thank you

    https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/come-rain-or-shine?utm_source=newsletter_segment&utm_medium=futurelearn_organic_email&utm_campaign=fl_january_2018&utm_term=15_01_2018_first_name_discover_something_new_in_2018

    Weather affects our lives almost every day through what we wear, what we eat and what we do. But why is it rainy, windy or sometimes even sunny? Explore some of the physical processes driving UK weather systems and get hands on in the world of weather with practical activities and fieldwork. Try your hand at forecasting and have a go at interpreting weather maps and compare your results to our educator Dr Sylvia Knight’s. You’ll also watch our educators carrying out simple but effective experiments including creating clouds or simulating hot air rising and demonstrating the Coriolis effect.

    Play Video
    View transcript Download video: standard or HD
    What topics will you cover?
    Week 1:

    Introduction to high and low pressure systems
    Weather and climate differences
    Depressions and anticyclones
    Week 2:

    Where does weather come from and why does it rain?
    Air masses and types of rain
    Measuring the weather
    Week 3:

    Global controls on weather
    Global atmospheric circulation
    Other weather systems: Monsoons, Tropical cyclones and El Niño/La Niña.


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