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How to give full permission on Window 10

  • 10-12-2017 11:23am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 1,812 ✭✭✭ Hannibal


    A friend sent me a few fonts to install. Every one went on perfect bar this one but my problem is it is saying I need permission.

    I have the only Admin account on the computer so I wondering why I need any type of permission and how do I go about giving myself full control.

    2uo07qv.jpg


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 21,199 ✭✭✭✭ Esel


    Maybe the file has imported permissions set by the sender?

    Not your ornery onager



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,812 ✭✭✭ Hannibal


    It's not really the file that bothers me. I'm more looking at why I would need permission off Desktop on my own computer that I am the sole Admin on


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 18,161 Karsini


    If Windows 10 gets an "access denied" response to a file copy, you'll get the above message. It's not always a permissions issue despite what the error says - it could be that there's a lock on the source file or that it's attempting to overwrite a file that is in use.


  • Registered Users Posts: 68,333 ✭✭✭✭ seamus


    Hannibal wrote: »
    It's not really the file that bothers me. I'm more looking at why I would need permission off Desktop on my own computer that I am the sole Admin on
    Believe it or not, this is actually a bad idea, even though it sounds like it shouldn't be.

    One of the big reasons for the spread of viruses and other malware was that it became the norm for people to log in with full administrative accounts so that they could go about their daily jobs without interruption.

    Home PCs often didn't even have any concept of permissions.

    In practice it meant that any code had complete access to everything without the knowledge of the person who was logged in. This was for both trusted and malicious code.

    Windows Vista introduced the concept of "User Account Control" where even if a user had full access, they would still have to confirm certain administrative actions. This meant that you could use a full admin account but code running under your name wouldn't have access to everything without your knowledge.

    You can turn it off, but I, and any other IT professional with any cop on, would not recommend it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,812 ✭✭✭ Hannibal


    seamus wrote: »
    Believe it or not, this is actually a bad idea, even though it sounds like it shouldn't be.

    One of the big reasons for the spread of viruses and other malware was that it became the norm for people to log in with full administrative accounts so that they could go about their daily jobs without interruption.

    Home PCs often didn't even have any concept of permissions.

    In practice it meant that any code had complete access to everything without the knowledge of the person who was logged in. This was for both trusted and malicious code.

    Windows Vista introduced the concept of "User Account Control" where even if a user had full access, they would still have to confirm certain administrative actions. This meant that you could use a full admin account but code running under your name wouldn't have access to everything without your knowledge.

    You can turn it off, but I, and any other IT professional with any cop on, would not recommend it.
    Makes perfect sense, thanks for the reply.


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