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heart rate monitor training

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  • 15-08-2017 12:42pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 159 ✭✭


    Hi,
    i have recently bought a garmin 920 xt and with the heart rate monitor.
    i am new to using a heart rate monitor and just looking for advance or tips on training with it .my runs are usually for a
    5 k is just go hard
    10 k is just try beat my best time by keeping below that pace
    half is just try keep it under 5 min kilometers .
    i dont really have a structure to my training.

    Thanks in advanve


«1

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 2,831 ✭✭✭Annie get your Run


    Training with a heart rate monitor is brilliant, if you do it right, otherwise it's useless.

    The very first thing you need to do is get your maximum heart rate. The internet is full of formulas you can use to calculate this, they are worthless. There is only one way to get your max HR and that's to try and achieve it while running. Here are some ways you can do that. (warm up with some easy jogging first).

    1) Run as fast as you can stand for 3 minutes. Rest for 3 minutes, then repeat the hard run again, and note the highest reading from that second trial.
    2) Another simple running test: Run a mile at tempo pace (hard but not killer), then a fifth lap that's faster, and a sixth that's as fast as you can go, accelerating as much as you can toward the end. The highest number you see is your max.
    3) Some runners also swear by 5k races. If you race that distance (about 3 miles) with every ounce of effort you've got, your highest reading toward the end of the race should be your max.

    Once you've done that you can then start to establish your recovery, easy, tempo and interval zones. Either let the watch tell you (if you use garmin connect or strava it will allow you to set your max HR based on your test above and then give you guidelines for zones). Or download one of the many reliable training plans that use HR zones.

    Probably the most important thing is that you should be running the majority of your runs at easy pace/zone. HADD (who was a coach in the US) uses a very simple formula for calculating easy pace, it's your max HR -50. You then run all easy runs at that HR zone or lower (not the average, the constant). That's just to give you an idea of what's out there. Find a plan that suits you best and be consistent.

    Currently you're running everything at your fastest possible pace. This is a common mistake for new runners to make but it's most definitely the wrong way to do it. Slow down and only run hard in a race or when your plan calls for a tempo or race pace miles.

    Best of luck with the new watch.


  • Registered Users Posts: 159 ✭✭dickidy


    Thanks Annie,

    i did the 5 k test and managed it in just over 20 min and my max heart rate was 190 and average was 177 bpm.
    yeh i though going race pace every session was wrong but gave me the motivation to get up and out but if i have a set plan i should be able to make myself keep to it.
    thanks again .
    now to go luck up some training programs


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 181 ✭✭torqtorq


    Its also a good idea to record your resting heart rate first thing in the morning.

    This represents your zero training load point.

    If your HR_rest is 50 bpm then a 70% training load would be 50 + 0.7 x ( 190 - 50 ) = 148 bpm

    A lot of training programs base their training load on maximum HR only but this makes no sense as peoples resting HR vary so much.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,831 ✭✭✭Annie get your Run


    torqtorq wrote: »
    Its also a good idea to record your resting heart rate first thing in the morning.

    This represents your zero training load point.

    If your HR_rest is 50 bpm then a 70% training load would be 50 + 0.7 x ( 190 - 50 ) = 148 bpm

    A lot of training programs base their training load on maximum HR only but this makes no sense as peoples resting HR vary so much.

    Good point, doing this also allows you to see when something is wrong or if you're over training. So, if your avg resting HR is 50, and suddenly it's 60 two days in a row you know you might be coming down with a cold / bug or you've simply overdone a race or training run and can take a few days rest.


  • Registered Users Posts: 159 ✭✭dickidy


    so my resting heart rate is 60 so 190-60 =130
    130 x .7=91
    91+60 =151
    so whats is the 151

    thanks


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,772 ✭✭✭jameshayes


    dickidy wrote: »
    so my resting heart rate is 60 so 190-60 =130
    130 x .7=91
    91+60 =151
    so whats is the 151

    thanks

    151 is your 70% figure.. have a look at the table below:
    heart_rate_zones_chart.png


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,003 ✭✭✭✭The Muppet


    Its something that has to be done right. I trained by heart rate last year for DCM , running in urban areas where the running was stop/start to cross roads etc . My average heart rate on finishing runs was quite low , I think that gave me an inaccurate appraisal of my fitness at the time .

    Just something to bear in mind with HR training.


  • Registered Users Posts: 159 ✭✭dickidy


    Yeh i have been reading up on it and its confusing the hell out of me. run slower to get faster and fitter etc.
    now i have my a base HR to work off i can google a few running and cycling plans based on heart rate ( and try stick to them )

    thanks for the advice folks.

    and if anyone has any or links please dont be afraid to share .

    sorry for the bother.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,772 ✭✭✭jameshayes


    dickidy wrote: »
    Yeh i have been reading up on it and its confusing the hell out of me. run slower to get faster and fitter etc.
    now i have my a base HR to work off i can google a few running and cycling plans based on heart rate ( and try stick to them )

    thanks for the advice folks.

    and if anyone has any or links please dont be afraid to share .

    sorry for the bother.

    Garmin Connect has HR based plans. They are great because you can sync them with your watch and use the 'do workout' function and follow the instructions on the watch.. ie: run 400m at 4:30 pace... rest 60 seconds - its interactive and full of beeps and buzzes to keep you on track

    I found it hard to get my head around the 'slower = faster' thing at the start, but it works. To put it into a very basic form; you have 2 power systems - Anaerobic and Aerobic. At the moment you're only training Anaerobically, if you start to also train aerobically(running slow) you'll get faster overall


  • Registered Users Posts: 159 ✭✭dickidy


    That's great , thanks a million. That's tonight's workout sorted . Read the instructions and set a training plan. Thanks again


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 181 ✭✭torqtorq


    jameshayes wrote: »
    151 is your 70% figure.. have a look at the table below:
    heart_rate_zones_chart.png

    Note that this table actually uses maximum heart rate and thus 70% is 0.7 x 190 = 133.

    I feel that working with maximum heart rate and ignoring your resting heartrate is nonsensical.

    Unfortunately this is precisely what a lot of training programs do.

    Think of it this way. Whilst remaining aerobic your HR will rise linearly with increasing running speed. It makes sense that your resting heart rate represents zero velocity and thus zero effort.

    Now imagine a person with a 45 bmp resting heart rate. They can actually move - slowly - at 60 bmp whereas the person with a 60 bmp resting heartrate clearly has a zero velocity.

    To have training programs that ignore this - based purely on maximum HR - is ridiculous.

    However having pointed this out, HR training is an excellent training method even when using a program only based on maximum HR.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,141 ✭✭✭rom


    You might want to read this a few times too https://www.angio.net/personal/run/hadd.pdf


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,199 ✭✭✭Keeks


    torqtorq wrote: »

    To have training programs that ignore this - based purely on maximum HR - is ridiculous.

    However having pointed this out, HR training is an excellent training method even when using a program only based on maximum HR.

    Do you have a link to information or table similar to above which is based on Zero trainng Point Load?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 181 ✭✭torqtorq


    Keeks wrote: »
    Do you have a link to information or table similar to above which is based on Zero trainng Point Load?

    This method is often known as "Heart Rate Reserve" or HRR method. Some of Polars heart rate monitors have a feature built in for this.

    The original equation is often called the Karvonen formula though I would substitute the actual measured maximum HR for the 220 - age used in the equation.

    http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com/heart-rate-reserve.html

    Actually Polar also advise that you use the true maximum heart rate in the Karvonen formula.

    http://support.polar.com/en/support/Heart_Rate_Reserve__HRR

    I have never seen a table for this probably because it would have to be multi dimensional.

    Googling "Heart Rate Reserve" will find plenty of info on this method.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,343 ✭✭✭dwayneshintzy


    I've been interested in doing some HRM training myself......my heart rate seems to spike awfully high when running though. Tested out on a few different devices and even saw a GP about it, so doesn't seem to be a faulty monitor. I'd have a resting heart rate of around 60, but will get up as high as 215 when running. I did a 5k in quite a slow time last week (though it was quite hot/humid), and averaged 188 bpm. Sound a bit odd?


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,561 ✭✭✭roosterman71


    How do people keep their HRM up on the chest when running flat out? Mine keeps slipping down. I've tried it tight, not too tight, etc. Handy runs it's OK and ya can adjust as you go, but sprinting that's not possible. I'd like to do one of these tests but not much point if the HRM won't stay in position


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,903 ✭✭✭zulutango


    Can somebody recommend a method (on the track preferably) to determine maximum heart rate? Mine is stubbornly low. When on a tough hill run it only goes to the mid 160's but I haven't tried an actual max test yet.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,062 ✭✭✭cjt156


    Quick & dirty method, effective in the majority of cases:
    Warm up, do 800m flat out. Rest for 5 minutes then go again. Your max HR should peak during the second 800.
    Calculate off that.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,903 ✭✭✭zulutango


    I've been interested in doing some HRM training myself......my heart rate seems to spike awfully high when running though. Tested out on a few different devices and even saw a GP about it, so doesn't seem to be a faulty monitor. I'd have a resting heart rate of around 60, but will get up as high as 215 when running. I did a 5k in quite a slow time last week (though it was quite hot/humid), and averaged 188 bpm. Sound a bit odd?

    What did your GP say? Everything I've read suggests that we're all wildly different, and maybe that's just your make-up.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 181 ✭✭torqtorq


    There are a couple of equations used for calculating your likely MHR based on age.

    1/ MHR = 220 - age

    2/ MHR = 208 - 0.7 x age

    Number 2 is the newer one and is supposed to be more accurate, particularly for people below 25 or above 55.

    Do not be surprised though if your measured MHR is a good 10 bmp different from the results of these equations.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,343 ✭✭✭dwayneshintzy


    zulutango wrote: »
    What did your GP say? Everything I've read suggests that we're all wildly different, and maybe that's just your make-up.
    Honestly, that's pretty much exactly what he said. I haven't used much heart rate training though, so still feels odd having these very high ratings even when I'm relatively fit and not even close to flat out.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,199 ✭✭✭Keeks


    . I'd have a resting heart rate of around 60, but will get up as high as 215 when running. I did a 5k in quite a slow time last week (though it was quite hot/humid), and averaged 188 bpm. Sound a bit odd?

    what type of HRM have you tested this with...is it a chest strap one?
    When you have tried with other HRMs does you HR always go high over 200?

    What I have seem with chest strap HRM in the past is that if the contacts are dry, then I would see my HR shoot up over 200 when clearly it was not and I was only at a tempo pace.....a quick wetting of the contacts (spit on finger and rub) and it was back to what It should be


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,343 ✭✭✭dwayneshintzy


    Chest strap and wrist monitors, and pretty consistently over 210 when I put in maximum effort on any of them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 159 ✭✭dickidy


    Hi james ,

    i am doing a looking at the garmin heart rate training plan for the half marathon. i did my last half in 1 h 43 min. im looking at week 10 ands the hardest day
    • Warm up, 10 minutes.
    • Run in Z4, threshold pace, 4 minutes. Recovery run, 90 seconds. Repeat 5 times.
    • Cool down, 5 to 10 minutes.
    • Stretch....
    is this going to make me faster as its all based on heart rate so it doesnt make a differance of fitness level.
    thanks


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 105 ✭✭redandwhite


    rom wrote: »
    You might want to read this a few times too https://www.angio.net/personal/run/hadd.pdf

    Interesting stuff.


  • Registered Users Posts: 159 ✭✭dickidy


    ITS MIND BOGGOLING


  • Registered Users Posts: 159 ✭✭dickidy


    i need your help again folks,

    i have been using the heart rate training program on the garmin 920xt and love it ( if im not being told what to do i will go as fast and as long as i can ), but here is my problem
    using the the program based on BPM my zones are Z5 179-199
    Z4 159-179
    Z3 139-159
    Z2 119-139
    Z1 100-119

    using the same program based on %MHR Z5 184-199
    Z4 169-184
    Z3 154-169
    Z2 139-154
    Z1 124-139

    is there ment to be a diffeance in the two or have i got it set up wrong.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,340 ✭✭✭TFBubendorfer


    dickidy wrote: »
    i need your help again folks,

    i have been using the heart rate training program on the garmin 920xt and love it ( if im not being told what to do i will go as fast and as long as i can ), but here is my problem
    using the the program based on BPM my zones are Z5 179-199
    Z4 159-179
    Z3 139-159
    Z2 119-139
    Z1 100-119

    using the same program based on %MHR Z5 184-199
    Z4 169-184
    Z3 154-169
    Z2 139-154
    Z1 124-139

    is there ment to be a diffeance in the two or have i got it set up wrong.

    HR zones are supposed to be the same, they were originally set up by coach Daniels and the formula hasn't changed since.

    Those two sets of numbers are definitely working off different max HR values. My first thing to do would be to check the setup on your Garmin.


  • Registered Users Posts: 159 ✭✭dickidy


    yeh i had a look at my set up and both should be working of max heart rate off 199.
    i got the %of max heart rate zones 90-100 % 80-90% 70-80% and so on .
    the first lot seemed very low as doing any work in zone 2 was near impossible ...l


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  • Registered Users Posts: 159 ✭✭dickidy


    i went in and changed it manually on the garmin to the above heart rates based on % of max


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